Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSubaru

Subaru recalls vehicles over engines that may start on their own

March 07, 2013|By Ronald D. White
  • Subaru Legacys are lined up at a dealership in Berlin, Vt. Subaru is recalling some Legacy cars and other models because of a problem that may cause a vehicle's engine to start on its own.
Subaru Legacys are lined up at a dealership in Berlin, Vt. Subaru is recalling… (Toby Talbot / Associated…)

Subaru of America is recalling more than 47,000 cars and sport utility vehicles because their engines might start on their own. Several models are involved.

The recall includes model year 2010 to 2013 Legacy passenger cars and Outback SUVs equipped with an automatic or CVT transmission and an Audiovox remote engine starter (RES) accessory.

It also includes 2012-13 Imprezas and 2013 XV Crosstrek SUVs equipped with a CVT transmission and the Audiovox remote engine starter accessory.

Subaru says that if the RES fob is dropped, it may malfunction and randomly transmit an engine start signal without the button on the fob being pressed.

If that happens, the engine may inadvertently start and run for as long as 15 minutes.

Moreover, the engine may continue to start and stop until either the fob battery is depleted, or until the car runs out of gas.

If such a malfunction occurred in a vehicle parked in an enclosed space, the risk of carbon monoxide build-up, which may cause asphyxiation, would increase.

Subaru will notify owners, and dealers will replace the RES key fobs, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin by the end of April. Owners may contact Subaru at (800) 782-2783 for more information

Original equipment keyless entry fobs integrated on the vehicle key are not affected. Subaru's recall campaign number is WQF-42. Owners may also contact the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Vehicle Safety Hotline at (888) 327-4236; TTY (800) 424-9153), or online at www.safercar.gov.

ALSO:

Toyota overhauls management

N.Y., Maryland workers top survey of long commutes

Despite soaring gasoline prices, more Americans drive alone

Advertisement
Los Angeles Times Articles
|
|
|