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Transcript: Rand Paul's filibuster of John Brennan's CIA nomination

March 07, 2013|By Morgan Little

The battlefield coming to America or acknowledging that is an enormous mistake. So there are some big issues here, some issues that we as a country I think gloss over. We - you know, you watch the nightly news and there's sometimes so much hysteria about so many issues, so many people yelling back and forth. But this is really an issue that I think if we could get a frank discussion - you know, I've proposed to the leadership - I haven't had much luck with this - but I proposed that for a constitutional debate or a debate of importance, that everybody come. And instead of hearing me for all day, we take two or three minutes and we go around the room and everybody speaks and it's limited but there's some kind of debate and discussion, less speech making and more debate. I proposed that we have lunch together. I've asked to come to the democratic lunch. I haven't been - I haven't got the invitation secured yet. It's only been two years so it may happen. But there are many reasons for discussion, there are many reasons why we should have civility, there are many reasons why people on both sides of the aisle can agree to this. If we were to have a vote maybe not on the nomination but a vote on restricting drones, there is a bill out there that we're working on that would restrict drones to imminent threats and really doesn't even get into the distinction of the military. Things in the country would be the FBI; it wouldn't be the military because that's the law. And there's an important reason for the law. But we have a bill that we're going to come forward with that we're working on that would simply say that there has to be a - a real imminent, lethal threat, something you can see. Which then I think people could agree to that. Because it's not so much the drone that we object to. If some guy's robbing a liquor store two blocks from here and the policemen come up and he comes out brandishing a gun, he or she can be shot. They once again don't get Miranda Rights, they don't get a trial, they don't get anything. If you come out brandishing a weapon and people are threatened by it, you can be shot. So it's important to know what we're talking about. We're not talking about the guy coming out of the liquor store with a weapon. Even a drone could kill him if the FBI had drones. So my objection to drones isn't so much the technology. There may be a use in law - for law enforcement here. But there are also potential, great potential for abuses.

Many government agencies have been - become buying drones and these hopefully will remain unarmed drones and it's a different subject but it's a subject that sort of dovetails from this into the next subject, which is should you have protection from the government snooping, you know, from the government looking through your bedroom windows? And I remember when I read "1984" when I was in hi school, it - it bothered me but I - I really couldn't quite connect. And I - I kind of was - I felt somewhat secure in the sense that, well, we didn't have two-way televisions. This was back in the 1970's. We didn't have the ability to look at people and the government couldn't look at me in - in my house 24 hours a day. And you could kind of get the feeling of how terrible that would be for that to happen and technology was behind that. And actually "1984" I think was written in 1949, so, really, talk about, you know, really being able to foresee the future.

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