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New York: Exhibit revisits legendary 1913 Armory art show

October 10, 2013|By Anne Harnagel

In 1913, the International Exhibition of Modern Art came to New York. Organized by a group of American artists and presented at the Lexington Avenue Armory (thus the Armory Show nickname), it introduced the American public to European avant-garde painting and sculpture.

Viewers were shocked, and some thought the art was immoral or depraved; critics were insulted and called the art "insane." Despite the outcry, the Armory Show transformed the art market in the U.S. and marked the advent of modernism in this country.

To celebrate the centennial of this groundbreaking exhibit, the New-York Historical Society is presenting "The Armory Show at 100: Modern Art and Revolution," opening Friday and continuing through Feb. 23. 

The exhibition reunites more than 100 masterpieces from the original show, including works by Duchamp, Matisse, Picasso, Picabia, Brancusi, Cézanne, Gauguin and Van Gogh, that had a powerful impact on American audiences. Images of 10 of those works can be seen in the photo gallery above.

Info: Timed tickets are available online at the New-York Historical Society.  Admission is $18 for adults, $14 for seniors and $12 for students (includes same-day general admission).

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