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Netflix wants more 'House of Cards'

October 28, 2013|By Patrick Kevin Day
  • Kevin Spacey appears in a scene from the Netflix show "House of Cards."
Kevin Spacey appears in a scene from the Netflix show "House of Cards." (Melinda Sue Gordon / Netflix )

"House of Cards" fans can breathe a bit easier. It looks like you aren't the only ones who want the complex political series to continue on past its second season.

Netflix's chief content officer Ted Sarandos revealed the company's desire to continue the series past the initial two-season commitment during an appearance at the Film Independent Forum at the Directors Guild of America headquarters on Saturday. According to Deadline, Sarandos told the assembled, "It was not our intent that [the show] just run for two seasons."

Sarandos later confirmed to Deadline that talks for more seasons were ongoing.

That's a big relief to those completely hooked on the acclaimed series, which follows scheming U.S. congressman Frank Underwood (Kevin Spacey) as he sets out to amass power for himself while simultaneously crushing those who would stand in his way.

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Director David Fincher reunited with Spacey for the project, which was adapted by playwright Beau Willimon from the original BBC production. And as one of Netflix's biggest original productions, it's certainly proved itself with nine Emmy nominations for its first season. (That's the first time Netflix -- or any Web-based entertainment -- had been represented at the Emmys). It ended up winning three, including one for Fincher's directing of the first episode.

But despite the warm reception, fans got a scare earlier this fall when the show's former co-executive producer, Rick Cleveland, told Gold Derby there would likely be only two seasons. "Kevin Spacey likes to do movies and Robin Wright likes to do movies," he explained.

Now it appears that talk was just speculation.

The second season is currently in production and is expected to debut on Netflix early next year.

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