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Jets place Mark Sanchez on short-term injured reserve

The Jets place Mark Sanchez, who has an injured right shoulder on injured reserve. He won't be eligible to be activated for eight weeks, but he still hopes to avoid surgery and play this season.

September 14, 2013|Wire reports
  • New York Jets quarterback Mark Sanchez, shown on Aug. 24, will not be able to play for the next eight weeks while he recovers from an injured right shoulder.
New York Jets quarterback Mark Sanchez, shown on Aug. 24, will not be able… (Julio Cortez / Associated…)

Mark Sanchez still has his sights set on returning to the field this season — as the New York Jets' starting quarterback.

But not right away.

Sanchez was placed on short-term injured reserve Saturday, meaning he will not be able to play for the next eight weeks while he recovers from an injured right shoulder.

"As far as making a decision that's best for the team and best for my medical health, we're all on the same page," Sanchez said during a conference call. "I'll come back, hopefully, in eight weeks and be ready to play."

Sanchez injured his right shoulder after replacing rookie Geno Smith in the fourth quarter of the team's third preseason game against the Giants. He has opted to try to rehabilitate the injury rather than have season-ending surgery.

Sanchez acknowledged that surgery is a possibility, but doctors are encouraged by his rehab so far. Some fans and media have suggested that Sanchez should have the surgery immediately, since it seems inevitable that he will need to do so. But the quarterback called those opinions "laughable" because that's not what the doctors have told him.

"They've said, 'Hey, you're doing the right thing,"' Sanchez said. "So, unless everybody is lying and everybody has it out to get me, I think we're OK."

The exact nature of the injury has not been revealed by either Sanchez or the team, but some published reports say it is a partially torn labrum. Sanchez has been throwing passes left-handed during practices and was doing the same Thursday night before the team's 13-10 loss to New England.

General Manager John Idzik pointed out that Sanchez had a similar injury to his right shoulder in 2010, and didn't miss any time.

The injury has clouded Sanchez's future with the team, especially with the struggles he had the last two seasons with an NFL-leading 52 turnovers. But though Idzik wouldn't commit to Sanchez being on the team beyond this season, he said the quarterback is "unequivocally a very important part of this team."

The Washington Redskins signed kicker John Potter as their contingency plan in case Kai Forbath (sore groin) is unable to kick in Sunday's game against the Green Bay Packers. To make room for Potter, the Redskins released fourth-string quarterback Pat White.

ETC.

NASCAR tightens rules to stop race-fixing

Facing the biggest credibility crisis in its long history, NASCAR issued a stern warning to its drivers and teams Saturday and said it won't tolerate any more attempts to alter the outcome of races.

After a scandal-filled week spent investigating teams and undoing attempts to manipulate its championship field, NASCAR came forward with a series of rules that will change the way teams have called races for years.

NASCAR Chairman Brian France told teams he expects them "to give 100%" at all times, meeting with them for nearly 20 minutes at Chicagoland Speedway in Joliet, Ill., on the eve of the opening race of the Chase for the Sprint Cup championship.

"I think we wanted to be very clear and we wanted to reinforce the cornerstone of NASCAR, which is giving your all," France said. "We addressed team rules, a variety of other things, all designed to do what our fans expect, and that means that their driver and their team give 100% to finish as high up in a given race as possible. We were very clear about that. That's our expectations."

The warning came after an unprecedented week for NASCAR, which has been rocked by allegations of race-fixing since Clint Bowyer spun his car with seven laps remaining last Saturday night at Richmond, the race that completed the 12-driver field for the Chase.

NASCAR was forced to investigate when it became clear that Bowyer spun in an attempt to stop leader Ryan Newman from winning and give teammate Martin Truex Jr. one last chance to earn a Chase berth. The investigation uncovered at least three instances of race manipulations and led to severe sanctions against Michael Waltrip Racing and the removal of unwitting participant Truex from the Chase in favor of Newman.

NASCAR has tightened many of the areas that allowed the manipulations to occur in a series of new rules that were outlined for the teams and will begin Sunday. Among them:

— No more deals, no offering a position in exchange for a favor or material benefit, no altering the finish, no intentionally causing a caution, no intentionally pitting to gain advantage for another competitor or intentionally wrecking another competitor. The list of things not allowed is a work in progress, NASCAR President Mike Helton said. Penalties can include suspension.

— Only one spotter per team will be allowed on the spotter stand. It means Roger Penske can no longer watch the race from his preferred perch on the roof, and NASCAR will install a camera atop every roof to monitor things.

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