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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1993 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prosecutors on Tuesday displayed a series of graphic autopsy photos for jurors in the murder trial of Lyle and Erik Menendez that appeared to reduce the brothers to tears. The color pictures show that their father, Jose Menendez, was hit six times and their mother, Kitty Menendez, 10 times with shotgun blasts. Jose Menendez suffered a fatal shot to the back of his head, a coroner's deputy testified as prosecutors posted a picture of the wound.
NEWS
July 3, 1993 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fred Gwynne, a dour but lovable stage, film and television actor for four decades who was best remembered for his leading roles in the 1960s cult television series "The Munsters" and "Car 54 Where Are You?" died Friday. He was 66. Gwynne died in his home near Baltimore of pancreatic cancer, his New York legal representatives at Kraditor, Haber & Bienstock announced.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1994 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Menendez family dream house, a Calabasas mansion featuring a tennis court, swimming pool and mountain views, was auctioned off Thursday in Probate Court for $1.325 million. Raymond and Vera Stewart, a Woodland Hills couple, bought the house at the proceedings in Beverly Hills Superior Court, submitting the only bid and paying the entire amount by check. The auction marked the sale of the last asset in the Menendez family estate, once valued at $16 million and now down to about $500,000.
SPORTS
August 7, 1994 | STEVE WILSTEIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ten years ago, a spunky sprite with a 1,000-watt smile and a girl-next-door name, Mary Lou Retton, vaulted from the Los Angeles Olympics across television screens into the homes of millions of Americans who fell in love with her. Sweet 16, 4-feet-9, a red-white-and-blue, stars-and-stripes ball spinning through the air, she made an entire country cheer on Aug. 3, 1984, when she landed firmly on her feet and flung up her arms, absolutely sure of a perfect 10 that gave her the first U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1988 | JOHN JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
It's Friday night at the drive-in. As the pale-skinned hero of the season's hot new martial-arts flick snaps the bones of the Asian archvillain, the Winnetka 6 erupts in honking horns and flashing headlights. The movie that has the big-wheeled pickups beeping is "Bloodsport." Advertised as the true story of an American who defeated all comers 13 years ago in a no-holds-barred international tournament of warriors, the movie opened last month at 800 U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1988 | Staff Writer Jerry Hicks
Prosecutors in the Randy Steven Kraft murder trial say a paper with 61 entries, found in his car trunk when he was arrested May 14, 1983, is a death list--Kraft's own score card of how many young men he had killed dating back to late 1971. Kraft's attorneys deny it is a death list, and call it meaningless information that will only inflame his jury. Kraft himself, in a 1983 interview, called the list nothing more than references to friends of his and his roommate at the time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1990 | PATRICK McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Protesters, angered by the recent Border Patrol shooting of a 15-year-old Mexican youth, blockaded the busy U.S.-Mexico border crossing between Mexicali and Calexico for nine hours Wednesday, effectively halting transnational commerce and preventing many farm laborers from reaching the fertile fields of California's Imperial Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1992 | PSYCHE PASCUAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was lethal conversation, laced with talk of painkillers and suffocation by plastic bag. But for Derek Humphry, co-founder of the Hemlock Society and best-selling author of a manual on suicide, telling others how to die is a way of life. On Saturday, the 61-year-old Eugene, Ore., author described how, in 1975, he assisted in the suicide of his first wife, Jean, who was suffering from terminal cancer.
NEWS
February 14, 1993 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was just another tragedy in family court. A young crack mother, desperate to conceal her pregnancy, had locked herself in a tenement bathroom and given birth to a three-pound boy. As she pushed, he fell to the floor and broke his skull. The mother abandoned him, like she had two previous babies. All were born addicted to crack. "Can we do anything about this woman?" asks Judge Judith Sheindlin, her voice taut with anger.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1997 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two and a half years after Delores Jackson drowned in his swimming pool, businessman Donald Bohana pleaded not guilty Wednesday to her murder and was ordered held in lieu of $1-million bail. A short bail hearing in Los Angeles Superior Court depicted Bohana as a 60-year-old businessman with widespread contacts, a pilot's license--and more than $4 million in debts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1999 | CECILIA RASMUSSEN
The annals of child kidnapping are replete with heartbreaking tragedies, but probably none have been quite as bizarre as the crime that first mesmerized, then convulsed, Los Angeles more than 70 years ago. By the time it was over, it would involve not only an apparent abduction, but also impersonation, police coercion, false imprisonment, psychiatric abuse and--this being Los Angeles--a court fight that stretched on for more than a decade.
NEWS
December 8, 1995 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roxie Roker, the elegant and beautiful actress best known for her role as Helen Willis on the long-running hit CBS television series "The Jeffersons," has died. She was 66. Roker died Saturday in Los Angeles, her publicist, Cynthia Snyder, said this week. The cause of death was not revealed. The actress, also known for her community work, had moved to Hollywood in 1975 when Norman Lear cast her in "The Jeffersons" as part of the upstairs interracial couple.
NEWS
December 2, 2001 | MARTIN FACKLER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Mrs. Liu could have had three daughters by now. But the shame and legal costs would have been unbearable, so she gave her second daughter away at birth and aborted a third when an ultrasound scan showed that fetus, too, was female. In 1949, the Communist Party took power promising to end centuries of degradation for China's women. Yet hundreds of thousands of unwanted baby girls are abandoned, aborted and even killed each year. For poor, rural families, the choice is as stark as it is cruel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2003 | Steve Hymon, Times Staff Writer
After struggling for months with wobbly finances and internal dissension, the director of UCLA Medical Center announced Tuesday that he will leave his job to take a top post at the University of Kentucky's medical center. Dr. Michael Karpf, 58, has been with UCLA since 1995 and oversaw the school's three hospitals and 18 primary-care clinics.
BUSINESS
March 8, 1988 | DAVID OLMOS
Can't seem to stick with your exercise program? An Irvine health fitness equipment company has a product designed to motivate you with a high-tech twist. Life Fitness Inc., a division of Bally Manufacturing, has been marketing its computerized rowing machine, the Liferower, for about a year. An unusual feature of the rowing machine is a 13-inch color video screen resembling a computer video game. The screen depicts two racing sculls in the water.
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