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112th Street Elementary School

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May 9, 2009 | Diane Haithman
Warhol and what? No, that's "Warhol and Watts." DeAnthony Langston, program director for the youth organization Urban Compass in Watts, loves that the name of tonight's one-off exhibition at the Pharmaka art gallery in downtown L.A. causes people to do a double-take. "Warhol and Watts," Langston says, savoring the words. "It's like peanut butter and jelly -- and mustard." Urban Compass' tiny office is in the back of Verbum Dei High School, a Jesuit-run institution on South Central Boulevard that represents something of an oasis in a troubled neighborhood.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2009 | Diane Haithman
Warhol and what? No, that's "Warhol and Watts." DeAnthony Langston, program director for the youth organization Urban Compass in Watts, loves that the name of tonight's one-off exhibition at the Pharmaka art gallery in downtown L.A. causes people to do a double-take. "Warhol and Watts," Langston says, savoring the words. "It's like peanut butter and jelly -- and mustard." Urban Compass' tiny office is in the back of Verbum Dei High School, a Jesuit-run institution on South Central Boulevard that represents something of an oasis in a troubled neighborhood.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2002 | ERIKA HAYASAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly 40 former students, teachers and staff members of 112th Street Elementary School--some of whom attended the Watts campus nearly 40 years ago--gathered Saturday for a collective thank you, recognizing the high points of their education. "There are a lot of accomplished teachers here that never got the recognition they deserved," said Sean Hannah, 34, who graduated in 1978, when he was 12. "They didn't seek recognition. They did it because they cared."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2002 | ERIKA HAYASAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly 40 former students, teachers and staff members of 112th Street Elementary School--some of whom attended the Watts campus nearly 40 years ago--gathered Saturday for a collective thank you, recognizing the high points of their education. "There are a lot of accomplished teachers here that never got the recognition they deserved," said Sean Hannah, 34, who graduated in 1978, when he was 12. "They didn't seek recognition. They did it because they cared."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1985 | RON HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
I live in Watts. It's as simple as that. I've lived here since October. No, I'm not a crusader who is championing the cause of the downtrodden by living "in the community." The fact is that I bought a house here, a nice little two-bedroom stucco place with front and back yards, a fireplace and a two-car garage. The street seemed OK and the price was right. The idea was to fix it up and sell it quickly for a tidy piece of change.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1997
The sun was beating down on the students sitting on the hot pavement of the 112th Street Elementary School playground in Watts, but for most of them, the view was just fine. Their wide eyes were fixed on the bags of new toys piled at the edge of the asphalt, waiting to be distributed. More than 700 toys were donated to the school by the Bonsai Foundation, a nonprofit organization created by the makers of the Might Morphin Power Rangers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1997
Students at two elementary schools listed among the Los Angeles Unified School District's lowest-performing 100 scored above the national median on recently administered standardized tests, and well above the district's appallingly low average. Principals at the 112th Street Elementary School in Watts and Westminster Elementary School in Venice credit strong teachers for the surprising showing in student achievement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1996
The children ignored Bonnie Bracey when she told them it was time to leave the truck. They just kept pounding away on the computers. The 10 children, ages 4 to 12, and Bracey, a Virginia schoolteacher, were on CyberEd, a truck full of computers, printers and a small presentation theater. The truck was parked Tuesday at 112th Street Elementary School in Watts, where it was packed with students, teachers, residents and computer experts. The truck will remain at the school today.
NEWS
September 19, 1993 | SANDRA HERNANDEZ
Randy Flynn likes taking photographs during family reunions and birthday parties, but the 15-year-old student had never given a thought to entering a photo contest until recently. Now Randy is among 100 students in Watts taking part in Young Wings of Change, a photography competition sponsored by Giorgio Beverly Hills that kicked off last week at Edwin Markham Middle School with a visit from professional photographers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 2006 | Mitchell Landsberg, Times Staff Writer
You could tell the students were nervous at the start of the science competition Wednesday between 112th Street Elementary School in Watts and Wilder's Preparatory Academy in Inglewood. "Name the two kinds of organisms on Earth," one fourth-grader from 112th was asked. "Animals and plants," the student answered correctly. "Which one are you?" "I am a plant."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1985 | RON HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
I live in Watts. It's as simple as that. I've lived here since October. No, I'm not a crusader who is championing the cause of the downtrodden by living "in the community." The fact is that I bought a house here, a nice little two-bedroom stucco place with front and back yards, a fireplace and a two-car garage. The street seemed OK and the price was right. The idea was to fix it up and sell it quickly for a tidy piece of change.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1992 | LAURIE BECKLUND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Claiming that the United States has degenerated into "two Americas," former President Jimmy Carter made an emotional bid in Los Angeles on Tuesday to launch a nationwide effort, which he calls Project America, to dispel the "hopelessness" he believes Americans feel about inner cities. Carter said he has already made arrangements with President-elect Bill Clinton to meet with him, Rebuild L.A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1995 | JOHN L. MITCHELL and EDWARD J. BOYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Larry Townsend was on vacation, in the lounge of a Toronto hotel, glued to a big-screen television set, amazed at the sea of humanity gathered in Washington for the Million Man March. Suddenly, the retired Los Angeles police detective felt out of place; he yearned to be among the hundreds of thousands of African American males dedicating themselves to redeeming black neighborhoods.
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