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OPINION
June 3, 2012 | By Andrea Wulf
Forget the "ring of fire" solar eclipse. On Tuesday, the heavens have something much more exciting in store: a transit of Venus, which is one of the rarest of astronomical events. In the afternoon, just after 3 p.m. in California, Venus will move between Earth and the sun, and for a few hours it will be a perfect black dot moving slowly across the sun's burning face. Such transits come as pairs - with an eight-year interval - but it then takes more than a century for the planets to do the dance again.
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OPINION
February 15, 2014
Re "His sights are set on governorship," Feb. 12 Apparently, Assemblyman Tim Donnelly - a Republican gubernatorial candidate - thinks we're still fighting the Redcoats, judging by his shooting at an image of a zombie dressed as an 18th century British soldier. We made peace with the British a long time ago. Our enemies today are unemployment, poverty, environmental damage and substance abuse. If Donnelly wishes to be governor, he needs to redirect his high horse and gallivant into the 21st century.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 2011 | By Rick Rojas, Los Angeles Times
Thousands of characters — letters and obscure symbols — filled the more than 100 pages of a centuries-old text that had been located in East Berlin after the end of the Cold War. No one knew what the text meant, or even what language it was in. It was a mystery that USC computer scientist Kevin Knight and two Swedish researchers sought to solve. After months of painstaking work and a few trips down the wrong path, the moment finally came when the team knew it was on to something.
OPINION
October 15, 2013 | By Joseph J. Ellis
When matters become extremely dire and disheartening, as they have been in the blatantly dysfunctional Congress, historians are usually the designated dispensers of perspective. As bad as things are, we like to say, they have been worse and the nation somehow survived. But for the life of me, I cannot recall an occasion when a minority of elected representatives with such an absurdly partisan agenda was capable of stopping the government of the United States in its tracks. To be sure, stoppages have happened before, but not with a looming debt ceiling decision, which has threatened to throw the American economy back into recession, send the global financial markets into free fall and permanently damage America's fiscal reputation.
OPINION
October 15, 2013 | By Joseph J. Ellis
When matters become extremely dire and disheartening, as they have been in the blatantly dysfunctional Congress, historians are usually the designated dispensers of perspective. As bad as things are, we like to say, they have been worse and the nation somehow survived. But for the life of me, I cannot recall an occasion when a minority of elected representatives with such an absurdly partisan agenda was capable of stopping the government of the United States in its tracks. To be sure, stoppages have happened before, but not with a looming debt ceiling decision, which has threatened to throw the American economy back into recession, send the global financial markets into free fall and permanently damage America's fiscal reputation.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2006 | From the Associated Press
A Chinese ceramic bowl dating from the 18th century was sold for $19.42 million at an auction on Tuesday, breaking the record price for Qing Dynasty ceramics, Christie's auction house said. The famille rose (a pink-colored enamel) bowl, from the court of Emperor Qianlong, who reigned from 1736 to 1795, was also the most expensive work of art ever sold in any Asian auction, Christie's said. The bowl, sold by Chinese collector Robert Chang to Alice Cheng, a Hong Kong collector, is part of a pair.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1996 | ENRIQUE LAVIN
Priscilla Rainey, who turns 26 Saturday, left behind family, friends and school to become a sailor on an 18th century-style schooner. "I've wanted to do this since I was a kid," said Rainey, a deckhand for the Hawaiian Chieftain, a 103-foot square-mast tall ship that sailed into Newport Harbor on Wednesday. Making its first visit to Newport Beach, the Chieftain is anchored at the Cannery Restaurant on Lafayette Avenue and will be there through Jan. 15.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1990 | HERBERT GLASS
Musica Antiqua Koln--among the most celebrated and widely recorded of period performance groups, and MAK to its international circle of admirers--appeared in the Biltmore Hotel's Crystal Ballroom on Tuesday, part of the Da Camera Society's Chamber Music in Historic Sites series. Absent, however, was the German ensemble's founder, guiding spirit and first violinist, Reinhard Goebel, who recently suffered a serious back injury.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2005 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
A valuable 18th century violin on loan to a music student with a budding solo career was stolen from her car Sunday while the car was parked outside a Pavilions grocery store in West Hills. Lindsay Deutsch, 20, who studies at downtown's Colburn School of Performing Arts, is offering a $10,000 reward for the return of the 1742 Sanctus Seraphin violin, valued at $350,000, and the 1830 Francois Tourte bow, valued at $160,000, that was stolen along with the instrument.
NEWS
February 3, 1987 | ANN CONWAY
She may have looked as if she had stepped out of an 18th-Century dream, but breathtaking Kit Toth stepped out of a 20th-Century van when she arrived at the Amadeus Ball, the celebration honoring Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart at the Newporter Resort on Friday night. The wired silk poufs on her Erte-inspired gown prevented the Newport socialite from ensconcing herself in the sleek, family BMW. So, she made the trip from Big Canyon in a van borrowed from her maid. "I rode over on my knees!"
NEWS
May 11, 2013 | By David A. Keeps
The 21st century soundtrack to Baz Luhrmann's splashy remake of "The Great Gatsby" may be a head-scratcher, but design fans can't quibble with the period sets created by production designer Catherine Martin. "The phone has been ringing off the hook," said Frank Pollaro , a custom furniture maker renowned for reproductions of Jazz Age designs. "People are falling in love with Art Deco again. " Pollaro, who wasn't involved in the film's production, isn't the only one noting how much excitement the film's period design has managed to generate.
NATIONAL
March 30, 2013 | By Jenny Deam, Los Angeles Times
Tucked away and forgotten for years in a museum storage bin, the small oil painting held a great secret and was just biding its time, waiting for someone to notice it. And then one day someone did. So began the Case of the Curious Curator. It all started in 2000 (actually a couple centuries earlier, but that's getting ahead of the story) when a canvas in dreadful condition called "Venice: The Molo from the Bacino di S. Marco" was bequeathed to the Denver Art Museum from a deceased local collector's foundation.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
In "Jacob's Folly," Rebecca Miller has landed on a narrative voice that's antique, droll, racy and occasionally cutting - imagine an 18th century French rake being played by David Niven. But instead of putting an elegant, handsome man behind that voice, Miller has given it to a fly. A common housefly, yes, but more importantly, it's the proverbial fly on the wall. Embodying that metaphor so literally is silly but also brilliant; in a sense this is what writers do, spy on their invented worlds, eavesdrop on their characters.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2013 | By Suzanne Muchnic
Seventeen years have passed since Robert T. Singer, curator of Japanese art at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, spotted an extraordinary pair of 18th century screens in an exhibition at the Kyoto University Museum of Art. Smitten with Maruyama Okyo's exquisitely detailed depiction of 17 life-size cranes on a glowing background of gold leaf, he decided that LACMA had to have the rare and valuable artwork. It took 13 years, amid many other projects, for Singer to find the owner of the privately held screens.
TRAVEL
December 12, 2012 | Christopher Reynolds
Framed by a Moorish arch (or is it just a Moorish-looking arch?), a blue-green Islamic minaret (or does it just look like a minaret?) rises above tall trees in a city with about 1.5 million residents. This might be a good time to remember that the words azure, admiral, adobe, alcohol and assassin all came to English by way of Arabic. The same is true for many Spanish words. But maybe none of that matters. What city are we looking at, and when did this tower go up? Cairo; 10th century Esfahan, Iran; 18th century Las Vegas; 21st century Granada, Spain; 11th century Tijuana; 20th century Tijuana is the right answer.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"A Royal Affair" is not as racy as it sounds. This highly polished costume drama is exceptionally well-made and a model of intelligent restraint, but it is also unapologetically earnest and a bit on the bloodless side. For though the illicit physical passion implied by the title is definitely part of the story, this Danish film (the country's best foreign-language Oscar entry) is more about a transgressive couple's zeal for freedom and political reform, which while noble and involving, is not exactly barn-burner material.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1988 | DONALD CHASE
A periwigged, pear-shaped castrato is trilling the "Largo" from Handel's opera "Xerxes" in the grand salon of the suburban Chateau Maisons Laffittes. The singer, played by Brasilian Paolo Abel do Nasciemento, is rococo in the extreme. So is the vast salon--crystal-and-gilt chandeliers, walls hung with blue-and-gray tapestries--crowded with dozens of extras dressed in the silks and brocades of 18th-Century French aristocracy.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2002 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT
The fall art season blasts out of the gate fast this year, with most of the major museum exhibitions having opened in the past week. A few smaller but still provocative undertakings will turn up later. At the J. Paul Getty Museum, "Greuze the Draftsman" (through Dec. 1) assembles 70 drawings from the Louvre, the Hermitage and other public and private collections internationally for the first such show devoted to Jean-Baptiste Greuze (1725-1805).
OPINION
June 3, 2012 | By Andrea Wulf
Forget the "ring of fire" solar eclipse. On Tuesday, the heavens have something much more exciting in store: a transit of Venus, which is one of the rarest of astronomical events. In the afternoon, just after 3 p.m. in California, Venus will move between Earth and the sun, and for a few hours it will be a perfect black dot moving slowly across the sun's burning face. Such transits come as pairs - with an eight-year interval - but it then takes more than a century for the planets to do the dance again.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2012 | By Margaret Gray
How do you do a comedy of manners when the manners are 400 years out of date? True, Molière has aged remarkably little over the centuries. Audiences at the Actors Co-op's revival of “The Learned Ladies” (1672) may not know many women who have forsworn love for scholarship, but they've certainly met pretentious people. You don't have to be from France or the 17th century to enjoy watching the eponymous ladies outdo one another in their praise of a silly sonnet. On the other hand, it's a talky play - in rhyme, no less - filled with clever figures of speech, puns and innuendos, all gracefully translated from the French by the poet Richard Wilbur.
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