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1920s Decade

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1999 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Linda Fitak lives in the '90s, but her heart and soul are in the Roaring '20s. She sings 1920s songs, draws portraits of movie stars from the '20s and dances the Charleston like someone out of an F. Scott Fitzgerald novel. Her husband, Tim, is as trapped in the '20s as she. They spend their spare time combing movie collectible shows for period paraphernalia to more perfectly re-create the age they love.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1999 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Linda Fitak lives in the '90s, but her heart and soul are in the Roaring '20s. She sings 1920s songs, draws portraits of movie stars from the '20s and dances the Charleston like someone out of an F. Scott Fitzgerald novel. Her husband, Tim, is as trapped in the '20s as she. They spend their spare time combing movie collectible shows for period paraphernalia to more perfectly re-create the age they love.
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MAGAZINE
March 12, 2006 | Rick Wartzman
The lofts of Los Angeles have a lot going for them: an abundance of light, plenty of elbow room, views that are frequently breathtaking and, in many cases, the capacity to stimulate the inner artist in those who reside there. But what makes a loft truly special, in my mind, is its ghosts. They are the "seamstresses or printers who hunched over long tables, toiling 14 hours a day," as Barbara Thornburg describes in her incisive piece ("You Call This a Loft?" page 16).
BUSINESS
November 10, 1993 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Thanks to Tuesday's report that producer prices declined in October, last week's rise in interest rates looks like a hiccup, not a trend. The wholesale price report calmed inflation fears among money managers and sent bond markets rising again. Stocks were mixed, as relief about inflation mingled with concern for the sluggish economy.
BOOKS
June 8, 2008 | Wendy Smith, Wendy Smith is a critic and the author of "Real Life Drama: The Group Theatre and America, 1931-1940."
IT SEEMS a long way from the 1689 (or so) publication of the first American children's book, which aimed to set young people "on the path to a good Christian life," to today's booming marketplace, rife with unabashedly commercial offerings that (in the eyes of the high-minded) lure kids away from more substantial fare.
BUSINESS
February 7, 2003 | David Streitfeld, Times Staff Writer
For decades, finicky children have been eating peanut butter and jelly sandwiches with the crust removed. From a legal point of view, however, the lunchbox staple was invented on a patio in Fargo, N.D., in 1995. David Geske, who ran a packaged ice business, was entertaining his friend Len Kretchman, a consultant. For lunch, their kids wanted peanut butter and jelly with the bread trimmed and folded over.
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