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1939 Year

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1989 | JACK MATHEWS
Pick a day in 1939, almost any day, and let the tornado whirl you into a never-never land of Hollywood excellence. Pick a day in the year that was Hollywood's best and try to imagine the luck of a movie buff with enough dimes to see every great movie released. Pick a day and skip past the portentous international news and go directly to the movie listings. Pick Aug. 15, for instance, the day that "The Wizard of Oz" premiered at Graumann's Chinese Theater in Hollywood.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1999 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two Holocaust researchers, who have traveled the world to uncover the fate of 937 Jews who tried to flee the Nazis in 1939 aboard an ocean liner that was later turned away by Cuba and the United States, will bring their project to the West Coast this month for the first time. They are still trying to track down 11 passengers who remain unaccounted for.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1999 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was May 1939, and the luxury liner St. Louis set sail from Hamburg, Germany, with 937 passengers, almost all of them Jews fleeing the Nazis. The ship reached Havana on May 27, but Cuba, already awash in Jewish immigrants from Europe, denied the passengers entry. The ship then headed for the Florida coast--and with the lights of Miami twinkling in the distance--the passengers sent pleas for admission to the United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1999 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two Holocaust researchers, who have traveled the world to uncover the fate of 937 Jews who tried to flee the Nazis in 1939 aboard an ocean liner that was later turned away by Cuba and the United States, will bring their project to the West Coast this month for the first time. They are still trying to track down 11 passengers who remain unaccounted for.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1999 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was May 1939, and the luxury liner St. Louis set sail from Hamburg, Germany, with 937 passengers, almost all of them Jews fleeing the Nazis. The ship reached Havana on May 27, but Cuba, already awash in Jewish immigrants from Europe, denied the passengers entry. The ship then headed for the Florida coast--and with the lights of Miami twinkling in the distance--the passengers sent pleas for admission to the United States.
BUSINESS
May 10, 2008 | Martin Zimmerman, Times Staff Writer
Is Mercury headed for the junkyard? Speculation is mounting that Ford Motor Co., preoccupied with reviving its Ford and Lincoln brands, might decide to retire the Mercury nameplate rather than spend scarce resources trying to restore its former luster. Despite denials from Ford, the conjecture got a boost last week when Jerome York, a former auto executive and advisor to billionaire investor Kirk Kerkorian, said shedding the brand would be a smart move for the struggling automaker.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1988 | RHYS THOMAS
Dorothy's ruby slippers may represent the single most beloved memories of Hollywood movies, residing in that category with Charlie Chaplin's bowler hat, Charles Foster Kane's Rosebud and Sam Spade's Maltese Falcon. At the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, the slippers are on perpetual display in a simple, black box, the display card proclaiming . . . "The ruby slippers worn by Judy Garland (Francis Gumm) in 1939 MGM film 'The Wizard of Oz."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2012 | Lynell George, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Ray Bradbury, the writer whose expansive flights of fantasy and vividly rendered space-scapes have provided the world with one of the most enduring speculative blueprints for the future, has died. He was 91. Bradbury died Tuesday night in Los Angeles, his agent Michael Congdon confirmed. His family said in a statement that he had suffered from a long illness. Author of more than 27 novels and story collections - most famously "The Martian Chronicles," "Fahrenheit 451," "Dandelion Wine" and "Something Wicked This Way Comes" - and more than 600 short stories, Bradbury has frequently been credited with elevating the often-maligned reputation of science fiction.
NEWS
July 12, 1990 | From Times wire services
Milton Berle celebrates his 82nd birthday and 75 years in show business tonight in a royal fashion. Mr. Television will be feted aboard the Queen Mary in Long Beach with a television-shaped cake. Guests include TV stars of past and present, including Morey Amsterdam, Nancy Walker, Martin Landau, Richard Moll, Tina Louise, Erik Estrada and Pia Zadora. The party is part of the Queen Mary's salute to 1939--the year the boob tube was born.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1989 | JACK MATHEWS
Pick a day in 1939, almost any day, and let the tornado whirl you into a never-never land of Hollywood excellence. Pick a day in the year that was Hollywood's best and try to imagine the luck of a movie buff with enough dimes to see every great movie released. Pick a day and skip past the portentous international news and go directly to the movie listings. Pick Aug. 15, for instance, the day that "The Wizard of Oz" premiered at Graumann's Chinese Theater in Hollywood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 2002 | From Associated Press
Anton Malloth, a former Nazi SS guard who was sentenced last year to life in prison for beating a Jewish concentration camp inmate to death in 1944, has died. He was 90. Malloth, who was a guard at the Theresienstadt camp in Nazi-occupied Czechoslovakia, died of cancer at a nursing home in the south German town of Straubing on Oct. 31 -- 10 days after being moved from prison, Cord Lemke, a state justice ministry spokesman said Friday.
MAGAZINE
April 30, 2006 | J.R. Moehringer, J.R. Moehringer is a senior writer for West and the author of the memoir "The Tender Bar."
This is a big night for John Fante, and for his son, Dan, who is proud of the old man, even if he doesn't often say so. Dan needs to be in the right mood to speak well of John, and tonight you can see in his smile, he's in the right mood. Tonight Dan is setting aside the bad memories, the sorrow and rage and resentment over John, for a few hours. For as long as any son can set aside such things. Many consider Dan's father the best novelist Los Angeles has ever produced.
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