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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2001 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One Russian-American spy scandal killed Eugene Posa. Forty-one years later, his family fears another one could keep his body hidden. Posa was a 38-year-old Air Force captain from Santa Monica in 1960 when he was tapped for a team to replace captured American U2 spy Francis Gary Powers for secret aerial surveillance over the Soviet Union. But a Soviet MIG fighter shot down Posa's Boeing RB-47 on its first flight. Posa seemed to disappear with the plane into the Barents Sea.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2001 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One Russian-American spy scandal killed Eugene Posa. Forty-one years later, his family fears another one could keep his body hidden. Posa was a 38-year-old Air Force captain from Santa Monica in 1960 when he was tapped for a team to replace captured American U2 spy Francis Gary Powers for secret aerial surveillance over the Soviet Union. But a Soviet MIG fighter shot down Posa's Boeing RB-47 on its first flight. Posa seemed to disappear with the plane into the Barents Sea.
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MAGAZINE
August 13, 2000 | MARY MELTON
THE PREPPING HANDBOOK * The Democratic National Convention handed out hospitality kits to each of the 4,506 delegates, filled with California-grown raisins, oranges, tuna, olives, dates and wine, and a jar of "dietetic" fruit labeled, "Welcome Delegates -- Gov. 'Pat' Brown." * To accommodate feeding as many as 16,000 daily attendees, the Sports Arena installed "new radar ranges that can cook beef, bake potatoes and vegetables in a minute and 10 seconds."
NEWS
August 15, 2000
Convention oratory can be memorable. John F. Kennedy delivered his acceptance speech in Los Angeles on July 15, 1960. Here are excerpts: * 'We are not here to curse the darkness but to light the candle that can guide us through that darkness to a sage and sane future. As Winston Churchill said on taking office some 20 years ago: If we open a quarrel between the present and the past, we shall be in danger of losing the future. ... Today our concern must be with that future.
NEWS
August 15, 2000
Convention oratory can be memorable. John F. Kennedy delivered his acceptance speech in Los Angeles on July 15, 1960. Here are excerpts: * 'We are not here to curse the darkness but to light the candle that can guide us through that darkness to a sage and sane future. As Winston Churchill said on taking office some 20 years ago: If we open a quarrel between the present and the past, we shall be in danger of losing the future. ... Today our concern must be with that future.
NEWS
March 2, 1988 | Associated Press
Janet Cunningham, a leap year baby in 1960, gave birth to a daughter exactly 28 years later. Erin Michelle Cunningham was born Monday, two days ahead of doctors' expectations. "I never expected it," said Cunningham, who lives in Severna Park. "It's not something you plan."
NEWS
December 16, 1990 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK and PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When Pete Wilson becomes governor next month, he will bring with him one of his closest friends--the man he has always trusted to tell him when he is wrong. He is Bob White: loyal adviser, political strategist, keeper of the gate and hatchet man. To some, he is Wilson's alter ego. Without question, he is the man Wilson relies on to make things work. "He is politically very adept and sensitive," Wilson says. "He is not a yes man. I have great personal affection for him.
NEWS
February 12, 1985 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Veteran network correspondent Sam Jaffe, who was forced to spend the final years of his life denying that he was a Soviet spy, is dead of cancer. Jaffe was 55 when he died Friday at his home in Bethesda, Md., a suburb of Washington. Jaffe had been a correspondent for Life magazine and CBS before joining ABC television in 1960.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2007 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
Donnie Brooks, a singer with rockabilly roots who had a top 10 pop hit with the love song "Mission Bell" in 1960, has died. He was 71. Brooks, who lived in Burbank, died Friday of congestive heart failure at Mission Community Hospital in Panorama City, said his wife, Penny Brooks. "Rock 'n' roll history in Los Angeles -- that's what he represents," said Steve Propes, a historian of local rock.
NEWS
November 17, 1990 | From the Associated Press
Gideon Hausner, who prosecuted Nazi war criminal Adolf Eichmann as Israeli attorney general, has died. He was 75. He had been hospitalized for the past three months in Jerusalem, where he died Thursday. His family declined to give the cause of death. Hausner became a world figure during the 1961-62 trial, which ended with Eichmann's conviction and hanging for his role in murdering millions of Jews. "When I stand here before you, judges of Israel . . .
MAGAZINE
August 13, 2000 | MARY MELTON
THE PREPPING HANDBOOK * The Democratic National Convention handed out hospitality kits to each of the 4,506 delegates, filled with California-grown raisins, oranges, tuna, olives, dates and wine, and a jar of "dietetic" fruit labeled, "Welcome Delegates -- Gov. 'Pat' Brown." * To accommodate feeding as many as 16,000 daily attendees, the Sports Arena installed "new radar ranges that can cook beef, bake potatoes and vegetables in a minute and 10 seconds."
NEWS
March 2, 1988 | Associated Press
Janet Cunningham, a leap year baby in 1960, gave birth to a daughter exactly 28 years later. Erin Michelle Cunningham was born Monday, two days ahead of doctors' expectations. "I never expected it," said Cunningham, who lives in Severna Park. "It's not something you plan."
NEWS
October 22, 1990
Felix Pita Rodriguez, 81, a Cuban poet and political exile who returned home after the Castro revolution. Long active in the Communist Party, Rodriguez, along with Pablo Neruda, was one of the founders of the Ibero-American Anti-Fascist Committee in Madrid and Barcelona during the Spanish Civil War. He lived abroad as a student, writer and exile for many years in Venezuela, Mexico, France, Belgium, Italy, Spain and Morocco, returning to Cuba in 1960, a year after Fidel Castro took power.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2010 | By Richard S. Ginell
One evening in 1966, not long after the Los Angeles Philharmonic moved into the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, concertgoers were surprised to find a picket line in front of the hall on opening night. Though picket lines were a dime a dozen in the '60s, this one was unusual, for these young music lovers were protesting the shortage of works by Gustav Mahler on the philharmonic's agenda. The protest received radio coverage, and it had the effect of launching the local Gustav Mahler Society. Can you imagine such a scene today?
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