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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2001 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One Russian-American spy scandal killed Eugene Posa. Forty-one years later, his family fears another one could keep his body hidden. Posa was a 38-year-old Air Force captain from Santa Monica in 1960 when he was tapped for a team to replace captured American U2 spy Francis Gary Powers for secret aerial surveillance over the Soviet Union. But a Soviet MIG fighter shot down Posa's Boeing RB-47 on its first flight. Posa seemed to disappear with the plane into the Barents Sea.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2001 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One Russian-American spy scandal killed Eugene Posa. Forty-one years later, his family fears another one could keep his body hidden. Posa was a 38-year-old Air Force captain from Santa Monica in 1960 when he was tapped for a team to replace captured American U2 spy Francis Gary Powers for secret aerial surveillance over the Soviet Union. But a Soviet MIG fighter shot down Posa's Boeing RB-47 on its first flight. Posa seemed to disappear with the plane into the Barents Sea.
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MAGAZINE
August 13, 2000 | MARY MELTON
THE PREPPING HANDBOOK * The Democratic National Convention handed out hospitality kits to each of the 4,506 delegates, filled with California-grown raisins, oranges, tuna, olives, dates and wine, and a jar of "dietetic" fruit labeled, "Welcome Delegates -- Gov. 'Pat' Brown." * To accommodate feeding as many as 16,000 daily attendees, the Sports Arena installed "new radar ranges that can cook beef, bake potatoes and vegetables in a minute and 10 seconds."
NEWS
August 16, 2000 | JOHN BALZAR
It was either a glorious summer week, "smogless and milk-blue, the skies stretched on day after day, as gentle and pure as they must have been a generation ago," as one writer described it. Or, as another reported, you couldn't see the mountains for the yellow fumes that cloaked Los Angeles 40 years ago. For the record, The Times reported "moderate to heavy smog" that July week in 1960 when the Democrats last came to town. Then, as always, Southern California allowed different views of itself.
NEWS
August 16, 2000 | JOHN BALZAR
It was either a glorious summer week, "smogless and milk-blue, the skies stretched on day after day, as gentle and pure as they must have been a generation ago," as one writer described it. Or, as another reported, you couldn't see the mountains for the yellow fumes that cloaked Los Angeles 40 years ago. For the record, The Times reported "moderate to heavy smog" that July week in 1960 when the Democrats last came to town. Then, as always, Southern California allowed different views of itself.
NEWS
August 15, 2000 | John Balzar
It was a liberal platform. Some said the most liberal they'd seen. Ultraliberal even. Scary, huh? The Democrats of 1960 did not know that being liberal would someday be the kiss of death in national politics. Back then you could be a liberal in the same way you could be a golfer or an orchid fancier, perhaps viewed around the neighborhood as a little possessed but probably not dangerous. And what did you stand for, exactly, if you were liberal 40 years ago?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2000 | SUSAN KING
The American Dream comes under the microscope with savagely funny and tragic results in "American Beauty," this year's front-runner for the Academy Awards on Sunday night at the Shrine Auditorium. Thirty-nine years ago "The Apartment," Billy Wilder's dark satire of corporate America, won five Oscars, including best film, screenplay and director.
NEWS
August 15, 2000
Convention oratory can be memorable. John F. Kennedy delivered his acceptance speech in Los Angeles on July 15, 1960. Here are excerpts: * 'We are not here to curse the darkness but to light the candle that can guide us through that darkness to a sage and sane future. As Winston Churchill said on taking office some 20 years ago: If we open a quarrel between the present and the past, we shall be in danger of losing the future. ... Today our concern must be with that future.
NEWS
March 2, 1988 | Associated Press
Janet Cunningham, a leap year baby in 1960, gave birth to a daughter exactly 28 years later. Erin Michelle Cunningham was born Monday, two days ahead of doctors' expectations. "I never expected it," said Cunningham, who lives in Severna Park. "It's not something you plan."
NEWS
December 16, 1990 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK and PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When Pete Wilson becomes governor next month, he will bring with him one of his closest friends--the man he has always trusted to tell him when he is wrong. He is Bob White: loyal adviser, political strategist, keeper of the gate and hatchet man. To some, he is Wilson's alter ego. Without question, he is the man Wilson relies on to make things work. "He is politically very adept and sensitive," Wilson says. "He is not a yes man. I have great personal affection for him.
NEWS
August 15, 2000 | John Balzar
It was a liberal platform. Some said the most liberal they'd seen. Ultraliberal even. Scary, huh? The Democrats of 1960 did not know that being liberal would someday be the kiss of death in national politics. Back then you could be a liberal in the same way you could be a golfer or an orchid fancier, perhaps viewed around the neighborhood as a little possessed but probably not dangerous. And what did you stand for, exactly, if you were liberal 40 years ago?
NEWS
August 15, 2000
Convention oratory can be memorable. John F. Kennedy delivered his acceptance speech in Los Angeles on July 15, 1960. Here are excerpts: * 'We are not here to curse the darkness but to light the candle that can guide us through that darkness to a sage and sane future. As Winston Churchill said on taking office some 20 years ago: If we open a quarrel between the present and the past, we shall be in danger of losing the future. ... Today our concern must be with that future.
MAGAZINE
August 13, 2000 | MARY MELTON
THE PREPPING HANDBOOK * The Democratic National Convention handed out hospitality kits to each of the 4,506 delegates, filled with California-grown raisins, oranges, tuna, olives, dates and wine, and a jar of "dietetic" fruit labeled, "Welcome Delegates -- Gov. 'Pat' Brown." * To accommodate feeding as many as 16,000 daily attendees, the Sports Arena installed "new radar ranges that can cook beef, bake potatoes and vegetables in a minute and 10 seconds."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2000 | SUSAN KING
The American Dream comes under the microscope with savagely funny and tragic results in "American Beauty," this year's front-runner for the Academy Awards on Sunday night at the Shrine Auditorium. Thirty-nine years ago "The Apartment," Billy Wilder's dark satire of corporate America, won five Oscars, including best film, screenplay and director.
NEWS
March 2, 1988 | Associated Press
Janet Cunningham, a leap year baby in 1960, gave birth to a daughter exactly 28 years later. Erin Michelle Cunningham was born Monday, two days ahead of doctors' expectations. "I never expected it," said Cunningham, who lives in Severna Park. "It's not something you plan."
NEWS
February 12, 1985 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Veteran network correspondent Sam Jaffe, who was forced to spend the final years of his life denying that he was a Soviet spy, is dead of cancer. Jaffe was 55 when he died Friday at his home in Bethesda, Md., a suburb of Washington. Jaffe had been a correspondent for Life magazine and CBS before joining ABC television in 1960.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2007 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Pedro Knight, a former lead trumpet player for Cuba's legendary band La Sonora Matancera and the devoted husband of the late "Queen of Salsa" Celia Cruz, whose career he helped guide, has died. He was 85. Knight died Saturday at Methodist Hospital in Arcadia, hospital spokesman Tony Yang said. Although the cause of death was not given, Knight had suffered from complications of diabetes and had a series of strokes last year.
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