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1960s Decade

NEWS
July 14, 1989 | STANLEY MEISLER, Times Staff Writer
It is only 25 years since President Lyndon B. Johnson first declared his hopes and plans for a Great Society in America, but his words now sound as distant and strange as echoes from another epoch in another world. So remote do those times seem to the present era of budget restraints and hands-off government that the anniversary of Johnson's speech launching the Great Society--May 22, 1964, at the University of Michigan--passed entirely without notice.
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NEWS
February 4, 1998 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN and ROBERT RANDOLPH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For the first time in modern Mexican history, a former president testified Tuesday before a congressional committee, as legislators plunged into an investigation of one of this country's most painful events: the army massacre of student protesters in 1968. Former President Luis Echeverria, 76, was asked to clarify the mystery still surrounding the military attack--an assault so bloody it started the gradual decline of Mexico's one-party state.
NEWS
February 1, 1991 | SUSAN CHRISTIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a sign of the times. During the decade that hippies turned into yuppies, Ken Lauher's customers occasionally brought in their gold and silver peace-symbol trinkets to have them melted down. "I made a lot of peace signs in the '60s and '70s, but in the '80s they were as dead as a doornail," said the Laguna Beach jewelry designer. In recent weeks, however, the seemingly passe anti-war symbol has risen from the ashes of the Reagan era.
NEWS
November 7, 1990 | ROSE-MARIE TURK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Don't give up your Ivana Trump hairdo, your hatbox-shaped handbag or your metallic sandals yet. They should come in handy next spring, judging from the latest round of fashion shows in Los Angeles. During two weekend forecasts, models hit the runways yet again in '60s falls and hairpieces to accent chemises and tank dresses that smacked of Audrey Hepburn, Brigitte Bardot and Jacqueline Kennedy.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1997 | EMORY HOLMES II, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A few moments before the screening of his feature documentary film "All Power to the People!," Lee Lew-Lee pauses in the lobby of the Laemmle Monica 4-Plex to share an anecdote about one of his heroes. In his wraparound shades, yard-long dreadlocks, dark olive blazer, black T-shirt, work boots and jeans, Lew-Lee, 44, seems the very essence of Hollywood cool. Looks can be deceiving. Neither Hollywood cool nor hot, the Silver Lake-based Lew-Lee might best be described as Hollywood not.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1991 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN, Patrick Goldstein is a regular contributor to Calendar.
The real reason why there's such a hot debate about whether "The Doors" is a masterpiece or a disaster is deceptively simple: Nobody can decide whether the decade of the '60s itself was a bust. Was it really an intoxicating era of heady idealism? Or was it a bad joke, an orgy of deluded flower-power, of acid freak-outs, bad bell-bottoms and even worse poetry? That's the problem with making movies about the '60s. In fact, that's why so few people have even tried.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1995 | LORRAINE ALI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you grew up in the '70s, you heard two kinds of music: the kind you grooved to happily and the kind you rolled your eyes to in embarrassment. One was what poured out of your transistor radio--KC & the Sunshine Band, Sweet and Zeppelin. The other was what your parents subjected you to during long trips in the station wagon. A bridge is forming, some 20 years later, over the chasm that divides those musical tastes.
NEWS
August 10, 1990 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It came to Dan Levy midway through a Grateful Dead concert on a hot afternoon in July, 1988. As a crowd of mesmerized Deadheads listened to the band in Berkeley's Greek Theatre, the 30-year-old publishing whiz kid suddenly had a crystal vision all his own. Here were thousands of loyal fans, he thought, many of them veterans of the 1960s music scene. An even larger number weren't born when the Dead, the legendary San Francisco band, was formed 25 years before.
NEWS
April 23, 1999 | ELAINE GALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They've shorn their wild hair, shed their bell-bottoms for blazers and now shuttle children--or grandchildren--around in minivans. But the former hippies of the Jesus People movement say their fervor for Jesus hasn't mellowed in middle age. In fact, many former young leaders of the movement from Orange County have matured into high-profile pastors at local megachurches. Among them is Chuck Smith Sr.
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