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1960s Decade

ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1999 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was one of the seminal moments of an already explosive year. On April 29, 1968, shortly after the assassination of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., thousands of students staged a strike at New York's Columbia University, putting their academic careers on the line to protest what they considered the school's unjust racial policies. Students seized five buildings and took over the office of the president. Filmmaker Lynda Obst was there, though only on the edges, she says, as a "groupie."
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1999 | JON BURLINGAME, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Three young people--late teens, early 20s--saunter into a seedy North Hollywood diner. The girl, a blond in a red leather jacket, with more than a hint of attitude, is confronted by a junkie in need of a fix. A slender white guy with a brush cut steps in to explain that they're undercover cops. The junkie thinks this is a joke. "He ain't lyin,' baby," says the third member of the trio, a no-nonsense black dude with a goatee and tight leather pants. "Hand-picked," says the girl, smiling.
NEWS
June 26, 1990 | ROBERT A. JONES
Do you recall the prediction that the 1990s will amount to a replay of the '60s? I'm not certain about its origins, but I believe this prognostication was based on the observation by historian Arthur Schlesinger that American culture revolves in 30-year cycles. If the Schlesinger theory holds, the '90s should flower into a decade of social turmoil and yearning for higher truths. This may or may not turn out to be the case, of course, but it behooves us to watch for the early signs.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1988 | JOHN M. WILSON
Not long ago, Newsweek columnist George F. Will laid into Jack Kerouac, the author most noted for chronicling the Beat Generation. Will, the Mr. Peepers of the political right, argued that the rebellion of Kerouac's period, and the "sandbox radicalism" of the '60s that followed, was essentially the acting out of immature malcontents who have long since sold out to conformity, materialism and other aspects of mainstream American life.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1997 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Advertisers are bringing back music from hit TV shows of the 1960s and '70s to give their products a contemporary feel. America Online, in spots from TBWA Chiat/Day, uses the score from the cartoon series "The Jetsons." Levi Strauss & Co. plays the "Partridge Family" hit "I Think I Love You" in a spot created by Foote, Cone & Belding in San Francisco. Ford Motor Co. uses the theme from "Green Acres" in spots for its Pathfinder truck. MCI Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1997 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taking his underdog mayoral campaign onto national television, state Sen. Tom Hayden (D-Los Angeles) Thursday defended the activist 1960s as an era that improved America. And he won. Helped by comedian/television producer Jeff Cesario and actress Annie Potts, Hayden stood his ground on the irreverent late-night talk show "Politically Incorrect" against an attack by a conservative commentator who blamed the ills of the 1990s on the decade marked by student protest and free love.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1991 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's been more than 30 years since John F. Kennedy inspired a nation brimming with youthful, postwar idealism and heralded in the wrenching decade of the 1960s. But all these years later, the period--which historians say didn't really end until the mid-'70s--apparently is still considered by some people to be too hot to touch.
NEWS
March 7, 1990 | JEAN MERL and SANDY BANKS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITERS
In the Antelope Valley, it was the anti-gang dress code. In Chicago, it was the firing of school principals. In Contra Costa County, school budget cuts. In Huntington Beach and Anaheim, it was the disqualification of football teams from the state playoffs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1992 | DEBRA CANO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They came wearing peace signs, tie-dyed T-shirts, bandannas and bell-bottom jeans. They brought picnic lunches, dogs, children, guitars and bongos--even the American flag. Just as free-loving spirits bonded together 25 years ago in the name of love, peace and flower power, the feeling Sunday among 25,000 concert-goers at Mile Square Park was hip, groovy and far out.
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