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1968 Year

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1994 | ED BOND
Thousands of pieces of junk mail stamped "Return to Sender" will be dropped into mailboxes in Arleta on Saturday to kick off a new campaign by residents to get a ZIP code independent of Pacoima. "When this post office took away our ZIP code and made us share the ZIP code with Pacoima, they have made it as if we don't exist," said Hawley Smith, a member of the Arleta Chamber of Commerce who has led a campaign to bring back the 91332 ZIP code for Arleta. The Arleta post office closed in 1968.
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NEWS
July 16, 1990 | TED JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 18 years after the break-in, former presidential press secretary Ron Ziegler on Sunday once again found himself answering reporters' questions about Richard M. Nixon and Watergate. But gone was the combative, evasive style that was his trademark at the White House. In fact, Ziegler was much at ease Sunday at small news conference following a private 90-minute tour of the new Richard M. Nixon Library and Birthplace, smiling and shaking hands with reporters.
NEWS
July 26, 1996 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Frances R. Eisenberg, who was dismissed as a Los Angeles high school teacher in 1953 for refusing to answer questions about membership in the Communist Party, has died. She was 91. Eisenberg, who tutored privately after she was fired, died Tuesday in her West Hollywood home of complications after surgery.
SPORTS
June 30, 1986 | GERALD SCOTT, Times Staff Writer
As the three-month Women's International Bowling Congress tournament draws to a close, Augie Karcher, for one, is impressed with the level of play from California bowlers. Karcher is the retiring publicity director for the tournament and has observed play since 1968. This year's tournament will have seen 51,000 bowlers compete for $1.05 million in prize money between April 3 and Tuesday evening at the Tustin Lanes and New Kona Lanes in Costa Mesa.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1993 | KURT PITZER
Continuing a tradition born during the civil-rights movement, about 75 Latino high school youths, some identified as potential dropouts, began a weekend conference Friday designed to inspire them to take pride in their ethnic origin and lead others to do the same.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2007 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Marilyn Neeley, a concert pianist who appeared as a soloist with symphony orchestras from Boston to Los Angeles, has died. She was 69. Neeley died May 30 of pneumonia at Holy Cross Hospital in Silver Spring, Md., her son Andrew said. She was being treated for bone cancer. A native of Glendale, she was a child prodigy who began performing before age 10.
SPORTS
March 4, 1996 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
How invigorating retirement was for Ryne Sandberg, who spent his 17-month exile from baseball discovering things he never seemed to have time for in the previous 17 years. Sandberg went skiing for the first time and fell in love with Utah's powdered slopes. He went water skiing in the summer. There were Wiffle ball games, basketball games and touch football games with his kids.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2012 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Roy L. Ash, a co-founder and former president of Litton Industries who served as director of the Office of Management and Budget in the 1970s during the Nixon and Ford administrations, has died. He was 93. Ash, who had Parkinson's disease, died Dec. 14 at his home in Los Angeles, said his wife, Lila. A Los Angeles native, Ash was chief financial officer of Hughes Aircraft Co. in Culver City before partnering with former Hughes colleague Charles B. "Tex" Thornton in 1953 in a new company that soon led to the acquisition of a small microwave tube firm owned by Charles Litton in the Bay Area community of San Carlos.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2009 | Susan King
It was a challenge that Barbra Streisand wasn't sure she could handle. Though she made her directorial debut with 1983's "Yentl" -- the musical drama about a young Jewish woman who disguises herself as a man -- she was initially wary of taking on filmmaker duties for the cinematic adaptation of Isaac Bashevis Singer's short story.
REAL ESTATE
October 16, 2005 | Ruth Ryon, Times Staff Writer
When it comes to where he lives, Mel Gibson is passionate about Malibu. He just bought his third house there, this one a 7,000-square-foot Mediterranean on 155 feet of beachfront, for $24 million. The director of the controversial blockbuster film "The Passion of the Christ" (2004) has closed escrow on a recently remodeled house, built in 1981.
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