Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollections1968 Year
IN THE NEWS

1968 Year

SPORTS
March 4, 1996 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
How invigorating retirement was for Ryne Sandberg, who spent his 17-month exile from baseball discovering things he never seemed to have time for in the previous 17 years. Sandberg went skiing for the first time and fell in love with Utah's powdered slopes. He went water skiing in the summer. There were Wiffle ball games, basketball games and touch football games with his kids.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2012 | Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Roy L. Ash, a co-founder and former president of Litton Industries who served as director of the Office of Management and Budget in the 1970s during the Nixon and Ford administrations, has died. He was 93. Ash, who had Parkinson's disease, died Dec. 14 at his home in Los Angeles, said his wife, Lila. A Los Angeles native, Ash was chief financial officer of Hughes Aircraft Co. in Culver City before partnering with former Hughes colleague Charles B. "Tex" Thornton in 1953 in a new company that soon led to the acquisition of a small microwave tube firm owned by Charles Litton in the Bay Area community of San Carlos.
NEWS
April 8, 2013 | By Patt Morrison
For U.S. reporters and editors, the term “illegal immigrant” looks to be going the way of the eight-track tape. The Associated Press is the news service that prompted Mark Twain to say, “There are only two forces that can carry light to all the corners of the globe: the sun in the heavens and the Associated Press down here.” AP's stylebook is regarded as the standard for language and usage, and it's just decreed that it “no longer...
NEWS
March 14, 1991 | LEE MAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's nothing like a few hundred rattlesnakes to get your senses racing. The smell hangs in the air, heavy, musky. More than 500 frightened and angry snakes huddled in a warehouse create a powerful aroma that seems to follow you days later. Then there's the sound of the rattles, a bzzzzzzzzzzzzz, multiplied hundreds of times.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1992
Suppose they held a presidential election and nobody won? That's always a theoretical possibility whenever three or more serious candidates compete for the White House, as happened in the elections of 1824, 1860, 1912 and 1968. This year it could become more than theoretical. All that has to happen is for likely presidential candidate Ross Perot to carry enough states in November to deny either the Democratic or Republican candidate the 270 Electoral College votes needed for victory.
SPORTS
June 21, 1989
At the U.S. Open at Oak Hill, Lee Trevino stayed at the home of Paul and Barbara Kircher, prominent members of the Rochester (N.Y.) golfing community who had put Trevino up in 1968, the year he won his first U.S. Open. "I remember when I got there, I went in and met Barbara," Trevino told Jane Custred of the Houston Chronicle. "She was taking groceries out of a paper bag. And it was all Mexican food from Old El Paso. "She said, 'I didn't know what you liked to eat. I got all this Mexican food.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2001 | GEORGE RAMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A flood of water nearly ruined Christmas at the Hollywood Sunset Free Clinic. But now a flood of donations is about to save it. Early Sunday, a man broke into the clinic in Los Angeles' Silver Lake district, setting off the sprinkler system. The resulting flood damaged several thousand dollars' worth of toys collected for a holiday party today for low-income children.
NEWS
April 19, 1988 | Associated Press
A polka dot dress, bullets taken from victims and a hand-scrawled notation that "RFK must die," were among pieces of evidence put on display today as state officials opened police records on the assassination of Robert F. Kennedy.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|