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1970 Year

NEWS
January 29, 1991 | From Associated Press
For the first time in 20 years, no one stood outside the Soviet Embassy on Monday demonstrating on behalf of Jews trying to emigrate from the Soviet Union. The Kremlin's relaxed policies led the Jewish Community Council of Greater Washington to suspend, as of Sunday, the daily 15-minute protests that began in December, 1970, a year when only 28 Jews were given permission to emigrate to the United States.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1998 | DANIEL CARIAGA
The American musician Garrick Ohlsson has actually grown up before our eyes. He was already a well-known competition winner when he captured the top prize in the international Chopin Competition in Warsaw in 1970. A year later, the young pianist played at the Hollywood Bowl, and has returned here many times. Friday night, coming back to UCLA--but not Royce Hall, scene of his local recital debut in 1976--Ohlsson again made a musical and personal triumph.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1993
In his own intense and meticulously informed way, the late Arthur Ashe, a gentleman athlete, championed justice on and off the tennis court, at home and abroad. He fought the stigma of AIDS, which he believed he contracted a decade ago from a blood transfusion he received after heart surgery. As tough as that fight was, Ashe insisted that nothing was as difficult as the battles he had faced as a black man.
SPORTS
January 25, 1999 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
"Eagles Go Ker-Plunkett, 27-10," read the morning headline, saluting the NFL's first wild card team to run the table (4-0) in the playoffs and win a Super Bowl. The Raider quarterback, Jim Plunkett, had a three-touchdown day at New Orleans, and Philadelphia's Ron Jaworski threw three interceptions. The game's most spectacular play was an 80-yard Plunkett-to-Kenny King touchdown.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2008 | Jocelyn Y. Stewart, Times Staff Writer
Charles Meyer Goldstein, a dentist and USC faculty member who advocated community service and organized free dental clinics that treat thousands of poor people each year, died Sunday at his home in Brentwood from complications of multiple organ failure. He was 87.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2010 | Jason Felch and Livia Borghese, Los Angeles Times
The trial of former Getty Museum antiquities curator Marion True ended in a bureaucratic whimper Wednesday in Rome when a three-judge panel halted the proceedings, ruling that the statute of limitations had expired on criminal charges that she had conspired to traffic in looted art. The development is an ambiguous end to a legal saga that has had a profound effect on American museums. When True was charged by an Italian prosecutor in 2005, it sent shock waves through the art world and was the first time an American museum official had been criminally charged by a foreign government.
SPORTS
August 12, 1990 | TED BROCK
David Nissenbaum, 40, qualified last week for the U.S. Amateur golf tournament starting in Denver Aug. 21. He last qualified for it in 1970, a year after he quit the University of Iowa's golf team. Nissenbaum says his comeback was inspired by his view from Allenwood federal prison in Pennsylvania. He told the Springfield, Mass., Union-News: "I could see a golf course through the windows."
SPORTS
March 16, 1999
Nothing fascinated early 20th century sports-oriented Americans quite like speed. Speedy horses, speedy boats, speedy airplanes, speedy sprinters . . . and above all, men who drove speedy cars. The mere thought of a human being driving an automobile--or "machine," as many called them then--at 100 mph rested crazily on the mind, like too much champagne. The first superstar of motor sports was Barney Oldfield, whose feats were so amazing his name became part of the vernacular.
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