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1971 Year

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1991
Colin J. Grier, a volunteer and community leader in the Sun Valley area, has died at a Tarzana hospital. He was 56. A longtime Sun Valley resident, Grier died Saturday of a neuromuscular disease, said his wife, Margery Grier. Born in Southampton, England, Grier was an aeronautical engineer for British Aircraft Corp. before immigrating to the United States in 1965. Grier worked as an aeronautical engineer for Boeing Co. and Lockheed Corp. and in 1971, the year he became a U.S.
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SPORTS
September 17, 1992 | CHRIS BAKER
UCLA's secondary wasn't tested in the Bruins' 37-14 season-opening victory over Cal State Fullerton because the Titans attempted only four passes. The Bruins didn't get to use their nickel--five-back--defense. However, they should get plenty of work in Saturday's game against Brigham Young, which is averaging 341 yards per game and ranks sixth in the nation in passing. "I'd like to have a little bit more action than I did last week," cornerback Carlton Gray said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1992 | MAIA DAVIS
The Moorpark College forensics team won third place among 76 community colleges at a national speech tournament last week, the 20th time in the team's 21-year history that it has placed in the top three places in nationwide competition. The 14-member team won 10 gold, three silver and 14 bronze medals in competitions ranging from poetry interpretation to team debate at the Phi Rho Pi Junior College National Championships held in St. Louis from March 27 through Friday.
NATIONAL
January 5, 2007 | From the Washington Post
The late Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist took a powerful sedative during his first decade on the high court and grew so dependent on it that he became delusional and tried to escape from a hospital in his pajamas when he stopped taking the drug in 1981, according to newly released FBI files. The FBI this week released 1,561 pages from its files on Rehnquist in response to Freedom of Information Act requests filed after his death in September 2005.
OPINION
March 14, 2004
Re "Giving New Meaning to 'Youth Vote,' " March 9: In 1971, 18-year-olds won the right to vote. They felt that if they were able to die for their country, they should be able to choose who was sending them. In a sense, that is what we as teenagers are asking. We are asking to choose who will affect our lives financially. We may not be old enough to fight the war going on now, but the decisions being made by our government will not only affect our generation but our generation's children, and we should have some influence.
BUSINESS
August 6, 2001 | CAROL VINZANT, WASHINGTON POST
Retired pharmaceutical executive Edward Adams sees nothing unusual in the way he holds his stocks: on paper certificates in a bank's safety deposit box, backed up by records held in his house safe. "I don't know the security of their system, but I know the security of mine," Adams said from his suburban Philadelphia home. "Could [the brokers' system] be compromised in some way? Could a blip erase your holdings? I have no idea."
SPORTS
January 9, 1985 | Richard Buffum
The Shields is among the prettiest small craft that sail Newport Harbor. It's easy to spot a Shields because the design is old-fashioned compared to racing hulls, which are beamy and have a chopped-off appearance bow and stern. A Shields' overhangs seem extreme. The well-proportioned leg-o'-mutton rig, almost evenly divided between mainsail and foresail, seems odd to those accustomed to "handkerchief" mainsails and vast overlapping foresails.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 2013 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Rosanna Xia and Doug Smith
More than 1,000 old concrete buildings in Los Angeles and hundreds more throughout the county may be at risk of collapsing in a major earthquake, according to a Times analysis. By the most conservative estimate, as many as 50 of these buildings in the city alone would be destroyed, exposing thousands to injury or death. A cross-section of the city lives and works in them: seamstresses in downtown factories, white-collar workers in Ventura Boulevard high-rises and condo dwellers on Millionaires' Mile in Westwood.
MAGAZINE
May 12, 2002 | BARBARA TANNENBAUM
On a wind-swept morning, Leslie Iwerks drives her white Jeep Cherokee down San Fernando Road on the outskirts of Burbank. She navigates surface streets for a 10-minute trip between Iwerks Entertainment and the Walt Disney Studios. By L.A. standards, it is a commute barely worth mentioning. For Iwerks, the four-mile journey symbolizes a lifetime of work. Make that two lifetimes. Her grandfather occupies an obscure niche in pop culture history, a position that Iwerks has long wanted to change.
NEWS
March 17, 1994
If you think you might want to attend a different high school next fall, now is the time to act. Under a new state law, students can attend a school other than their neighborhood school. The open-enrollment policy stipulates that transfer students be selected on a random, or lottery-type, basis. Most districts have put together brochures or flyers to explain the new policy.
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