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1974 Year

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NEWS
June 21, 2001 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This week's bitter Senate battle over patients' rights to sue their HMOs has its origin, oddly enough, in a 1974 pension reform law. What began as a worker-friendly measure that regulated corporations has evolved into a corporate shield against lawsuits from disgruntled employees and their families. It is a classic example of the Law of Unintended Consequences.
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NEWS
June 21, 2001 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This week's bitter Senate battle over patients' rights to sue their HMOs has its origin, oddly enough, in a 1974 pension reform law. What began as a worker-friendly measure that regulated corporations has evolved into a corporate shield against lawsuits from disgruntled employees and their families. It is a classic example of the Law of Unintended Consequences.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1999 | BILL DESOWITZ, Bill Desowitz is a regular contributor to Calendar
Twenty-five years ago, the country was in the grips of the Watergate hearings, an economic slump and the last vestiges of the Vietnam War. But the films we saw on the big screen in 1974 were anything but diversionary--they were revelatory. Michael Corleone gained a powerful Mafia kingdom but lost love, loyalty and family in "The Godfather Part II,"; private eye J.J.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1999 | BILL DESOWITZ, Bill Desowitz is a regular contributor to Calendar
Twenty-five years ago, the country was in the grips of the Watergate hearings, an economic slump and the last vestiges of the Vietnam War. But the films we saw on the big screen in 1974 were anything but diversionary--they were revelatory. Michael Corleone gained a powerful Mafia kingdom but lost love, loyalty and family in "The Godfather Part II,"; private eye J.J.
NEWS
August 14, 1997 | THOMAS BONK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here we are at Winged Foot, the scene of the crime, you might say. All right, after 23 years, the evidence is getting a little stale, but what happened at Winged Foot in the 1974 U.S. Open is not something that is easily forgotten. Beginning today, the 79th PGA Championship will be played at the historic, tree-lined course designed in 1921 by the ubiquitous A.W.
TRAVEL
October 11, 2013 | By Susan Spano
MONTEREY BAY, Calif. - Along Highway 1 between Marina and Seaside, it's all roller-coastering sand dunes and chaparral. There the road cuts across Ft. Ord, where soldiers trained for almost every war the U.S. Army waged in the 20th century, as well as deployments to Panama and the 1992 L.A. riots. Then Ft. Ord closed and it was over. In 1994, 36,000 soldiers and their families were relocated, emptying hospitals, barracks, chapels, stockades and 28,000 prime Central Coast acres.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1995 | JON MATSUMOTO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In 1968, a fledgling band called Iron Butterfly released an album featuring a decidedly unorthodox acid-rock song that rambled on for 17 minutes and included a 2 1/2-minute drum solo. Executives at the band's label, Atlantic Records, cringed at the prospect of marketing an album whose title track took up the entire side of a vinyl LP and came with the tongue-twisting title "In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida." Efforts to persuade the San Diego-based group to edit its opus proved futile.
SPORTS
June 5, 2006 | Peter Christensen, Special to the Times
It has been almost 30 years since Pele -- aka Edson Arantes do Nascimento -- played his last soccer match, an exhibition at Giants Stadium in New Jersey, cheered on by a crowd of 75,000. Pele played the first half for the New York Cosmos and the second half for Santos, his former Brazilian club. During the game, it began to rain. The next day, a newspaper headline read: "Even the sky was crying." On a recent day in the three-time world champion's new office in Sao Paulo, no one was crying.
NEWS
August 8, 1999 | Associated Press
In 1974, the year President Nixon resigned: * Inflation was 12.3%. * Unemployment was 5.6%. * Top song was "Killing Me Softly" by Roberta Flack. * Oakland Athletics beat Los Angeles Dodgers 4-1 in the World Series. * Gasoline passed the 50-cent mark to reach 58 cents a gallon. A loaf of bread was 39 cents. * Best Picture was "The Sting."
NEWS
January 3, 2000
The last original "Peanuts" daily cartoon, a message from Charles M. Schulz to his readers, appears today on Page E5. Beginning tomorrow in the same spot, "Peanuts Classics" will debut. The strips will reprise Schulz's work beginning with 1974, a year that the United Media syndicate said was chosen because it features the strip's well-known original characters as well as those introduced in later years, such as Woodstock and Peppermint Patty. The final original Sunday cartoon will appear Feb.
NEWS
August 14, 1997 | THOMAS BONK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here we are at Winged Foot, the scene of the crime, you might say. All right, after 23 years, the evidence is getting a little stale, but what happened at Winged Foot in the 1974 U.S. Open is not something that is easily forgotten. Beginning today, the 79th PGA Championship will be played at the historic, tree-lined course designed in 1921 by the ubiquitous A.W.
NEWS
December 27, 1985
Thirteen people were killed in California traffic accidents during the 30-hour Christmas holiday, and 581 people were arrested for investigation of drunk driving, the California Highway Patrol said. The generally low figures for accidents and arrests from 6 p.m. Tuesday to midnight Wednesday were attributed to the mid-week Christmas holiday, CHP spokeswoman Susan Cowan-Scott said. "It's actually not a whole bunch," she said, of the 581 drunk-driving arrests statewide.
NEWS
August 3, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A doctor besieged for nearly three weeks by protesters said he is more committed than ever to keeping his Wichita, Kan., abortion clinic open. Dr. George Tiller, 49, has been the target of Operation Rescue protests since July 15. About 1,516 arrests later, protesters continue to block the parking lot of his clinic nearly every day. "If I'm OK on the inside, what people say on the outside does not make much difference," he said.
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