Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollections1974 Year
IN THE NEWS

1974 Year

NEWS
July 30, 1994
Rosa Chacel, 96, a novelist and poet who was one of Spain's most prolific writers. Miss Chacel married Spanish painter Timoteo Perez Rubio and spent six years in Rome before returning in 1927 to Madrid, where she became noted for her dense and compact narrative style. She wrote her first novel, "Two-Way Station," in Rome and published it in 1930 in Spain. In 1938, as Gen.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
June 28, 1986
Robert T. Campion, 65, the longtime chairman and chief executive of Lear Siegler, will retire Aug. 15 and be replaced by current president Norman A. Barkeley, the company announced Friday. Campion became chief executive of the Santa Monica-based firm in 1971, when revenue was in the $500-million range, and became chairman in 1974. Last year, sales totaled $2.4 billion from its broad range of aerospace, automotive and industrial products.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2006 | From Reuters
"Evita" came full circle Tuesday with Andrew Lloyd Webber announcing plans to revive the '70s musical in London with Argentine star Elena Roger in the lead role. Roger, a fan of Madonna in the film version, was born in 1974, the year that Lloyd Webber and lyricist Tim Rice started work on what was to become one of their most successful musicals. Lloyd Webber said he had no plans to write new songs for the show, which opens in June.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2006 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
When Frank Sinatra ended his two-year retirement at 57 in 1973, Warner Bros. Records art director Ed Thrasher came up with the perfect title for the legendary singer's comeback album. The album -- for Warner's Reprise Records label -- with its cover photograph by Thrasher showing a relaxed and grinning Sinatra during a recording session, was called "Ol' Blue Eyes Is Back." "Ed showed the artwork to Frank, and he just flipped, as we all did," recalled Joe Smith, former president of Warner Bros.
AUTOS
November 29, 2013 | By Jerry Hirsch
Auto safety regulators are pushing for new equipment to protect motorists from their biggest threat: themselves. They're aiming to keep drunk drivers off the road with the help of onboard technology that immobilizes their cars. New vehicles may soon come with systems to help prevent collisions. And engines may not start unless occupants buckle their seat belts. It's all part of a push by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to use technology to reduce traffic fatalities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1992 | MAIA DAVIS
When Tina Abel sees the American flag, she remembers arriving in this country 40 years ago from Germany. "I stepped down from a ship in New York Harbor," said Abel, 69, who fled Europe after spending three years in a camp for war refugees. "They played 'The Star-Spangled Banner,' and we all cried." Abel was one of six flag bearers in a Flag Day ceremony sponsored by the Simi Valley Elks Lodge at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library on Sunday.
SPORTS
September 2, 1991 | THOMAS BONK
Jimmy Connors celebrates his 39th birthday today by playing Aaron Krickstein in a fourth-round match. Krickstein, who is 0-5 against Connors, says he doesn't think he will be psyched out by the Connors mystique. "I think a lot of guys . . . you get a five-time U.S. Open champion . . . if you read into it, you think about it too much," Krickstein said. "Then you can be in awe of him. We grew up watching him on TV, so it is kind of weird to be playing him (in important matches).
SPORTS
October 13, 1994 | The Washington Post
On a team of World Cup superstars--Romario, Hristo Stoitchkov, Gheorghe Hagi and Ronald Koeman--the most talked-about player this season for Spanish League power FC Barcelona has been a thin, 20-year-old midfielder with one of international soccer's most famous names. In the tradition of Brazilian and many Spanish players, he prefers to be called by only his first name: Jordi. But everyone in European soccer knows who he is--Jordi Cruyff, son of Dutch legend Johan Cruyff.
NEWS
November 4, 1989 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
East Harlem is inner-city America: where crack sells in rubble-caked lots, guns sound in the night, public housing darkens under graffiti, abandoned tenements rot on decrepit streets and tattered men just hang around. "You don't walk around here at night," said Allister Whitman, who supervises the speech programs in East Harlem's public schools. "If you walk around 109th Street," said Leslie Moore, director of a junior high school on that street, "you will see lines forming for crack.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|