Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollections1974 Year
IN THE NEWS

1974 Year

BOOKS
August 12, 1990 | MICHAEL HARRIS
During the Nazi occupation of Czechoslovakia, Ota Pavel's father and his two brothers were sent to concentration camps. Pavel helped support his family by working in a coal mine and illegally catching fish. After the war, he became a sportswriter, best known for "Dukla Among the Skyscrapers," a novel about a Czech soccer team's visit to America. Later, Pavel wrote two collections of short stories based on his father's life and his own.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 13, 1997 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Only those who were there would remember. The way Wallace DeCuir entered the station and greeted his colleagues every morning, knowing they would ignore him. The way Reynaldo Lopez kept his cool, even after a "Whites Only" sign was hung from the kitchen door. The day someone smeared feces on Earnest Roberts' pillow, and the other men watched. And laughed. In 1950s Los Angeles, these men fought fires, saved lives and slept under the same roof with white colleagues who did not want them there.
OPINION
September 15, 2009 | Frank von Hippel, Frank von Hippel, a physicist, is a professor of public and international affairs at Princeton University and co-chairs the International Panel on Fissile Materials. Previously, he was assistant director for national security in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy.
The Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository project is now comatose, if not dead. And that puts us back at square one on a crucial question: What are we going to do with all the radioactive waste being discharged by U.S. nuclear power reactors? Many conservatives on Capitol Hill favor the French "solution": spent-fuel reprocessing. But reprocessing isn't a solution at all: It's a very expensive and dangerous detour. Reprocessing takes used or "spent" nuclear fuel and dissolves it to separate the uranium and plutonium from the highly radioactive fission products.
SPORTS
December 17, 1999 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For all the madness and hype of modern-day Super Bowls, it's interesting to note how the NFL came to have its first championship game, 66 years ago today. In the 1932 season, the Chicago Bears and Portsmouth Spartans ended the regular season with 6-1 records, and the league quickly put together a title game--indoors--at Chicago Stadium. Chicago won, 9-0, and claimed the title, although the result was listed as a regular-season game.
NEWS
September 9, 1988 | Reuters
Republican vice presidential candidate Dan Quayle, a member of a wealthy newspaper family, was on the defensive again today over a report that he won entry to law school under a program aimed at minorities and needy students.
NEWS
September 11, 1988 | from Reuters
Republican vice presidential candidate Dan Quayle, a member of a wealthy newspaper family, was on the defensive again Friday over a report that he won entry to law school under a program aimed at minorities and needy students.
NEWS
November 18, 1990 | SUSAN CHRISTIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County wasn't born yesterday. But most of its high-rise hotels were born after 1974--the year that California adopted an ordinance mandating automatic sprinkler systems in new buildings taller than 75 feet. Therefore, the vast majority of high-rise hotels in the county are protected by sprinklers in every room.
OPINION
October 18, 2002 | Joan Anderson Growe, Joan Anderson Growe was Minnesota secretary of state from 1975 to 1999.
MINNEAPOLIS -- In 1974, the year I was elected Minnesota's secretary of state, my state was the first in the nation to implement election-day registration. Over 24 years in office, I supervised a registration process that consistently gave our state the highest voter turnout rate in the nation, with no increase in election fraud. On Nov. 5, voters in California will decide on election-day voter registration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Lorene L. Rogers, who served as president of the University of Texas in the 1970s and was believed to be the first woman to head a public university in the United States, died Jan. 11 at an assisted living facility in Dallas. She was 94. A niece, Donna O'Dell, told the Austin American-Statesman that Rogers had broken her leg in October and never fully recovered.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Joachim Fest, a journalist and historian who wrote one of the best-regarded biographies of Nazi dictator Adolf Hitler, has died. He was 79. Fest, who worked closely with Hitler's architect Albert Speer on his memoirs, died Monday at his home in Kronberg of unspecified causes, the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung reported Tuesday. Fest worked at the newspaper for two decades before leaving in 1993.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|