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1974 Year

SPORTS
February 10, 2003 | From Associated Press
A Croatian fan sitting courtside waved a sign as James Blake was about to serve: "You can't beat without Pete." The United States certainly didn't have Pete Sampras on Sunday when it was eliminated by Croatia in the first round of the Davis Cup. These are different times for the Americans at the Davis Cup. Instead of Sampras or Andre Agassi, or even the injured Andy Roddick, it was left to James Blake to keep their prospects alive.
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SPORTS
May 4, 1987
Ken Garcia broke a 4-4 tie in the eighth inning with a two-run single, then threw out a runner at the plate for the game's final out as Cal State Fullerton defeated San Jose State, 6-5, in a Pacific Coast Athletic Assn. baseball game Sunday at Fullerton. Longo Garcia (10-2) went the distance as Fullerton (16-2, 39-14) won its fifth consecutive game. Garcia got the first two outs in the ninth but walked two batters and allowed a single to load the bases.
BOOKS
August 12, 1990 | MICHAEL HARRIS
During the Nazi occupation of Czechoslovakia, Ota Pavel's father and his two brothers were sent to concentration camps. Pavel helped support his family by working in a coal mine and illegally catching fish. After the war, he became a sportswriter, best known for "Dukla Among the Skyscrapers," a novel about a Czech soccer team's visit to America. Later, Pavel wrote two collections of short stories based on his father's life and his own.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2013 | By Joe Flint
The Federal Communications Commission wants to eliminate its almost 40-year-old sports blackout rules, which serve primarily to prevent NFL games being televised in markets where the home team failed to sell out the stadium. In a notice of proposed rule-making released Wednesday, the FCC said the sports marketplace has "changed dramatically" and that the "economic rationale underlying the sports blackout rules may no longer be valid. " Adapted in 1975, the blackout rules were designed to prevent pay-TV distributors, including cable and satellite operators, from circumventing agreements between sports leagues and television rights holders regarding the blacking out of games that were not sold out. ON LOCATION: Where the cameras roll For example, if a San Diego Chargers didn't sell out a few days before kickoff and thus the broadcaster with the rights to show the game couldn't, the FCC's rule prohibits a pay-TV distributor from importing the signal of the game from elsewhere and showing it there.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2006 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
Edward R. Broida, who made a fortune as a Los Angeles real estate developer and used much of it to establish himself as a distinctive collector of contemporary art, has died after a long battle with cancer. He was 72. Broida died at his home in Malibu on March 14 after being hospitalized at the USC/Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, said his wife, Gisele Galante Broida.
SPORTS
December 17, 1999 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For all the madness and hype of modern-day Super Bowls, it's interesting to note how the NFL came to have its first championship game, 66 years ago today. In the 1932 season, the Chicago Bears and Portsmouth Spartans ended the regular season with 6-1 records, and the league quickly put together a title game--indoors--at Chicago Stadium. Chicago won, 9-0, and claimed the title, although the result was listed as a regular-season game.
NEWS
September 9, 1988 | Reuters
Republican vice presidential candidate Dan Quayle, a member of a wealthy newspaper family, was on the defensive again today over a report that he won entry to law school under a program aimed at minorities and needy students.
NEWS
September 11, 1988 | from Reuters
Republican vice presidential candidate Dan Quayle, a member of a wealthy newspaper family, was on the defensive again Friday over a report that he won entry to law school under a program aimed at minorities and needy students.
NEWS
November 18, 1990 | SUSAN CHRISTIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County wasn't born yesterday. But most of its high-rise hotels were born after 1974--the year that California adopted an ordinance mandating automatic sprinkler systems in new buildings taller than 75 feet. Therefore, the vast majority of high-rise hotels in the county are protected by sprinklers in every room.
OPINION
October 18, 2002 | Joan Anderson Growe, Joan Anderson Growe was Minnesota secretary of state from 1975 to 1999.
MINNEAPOLIS -- In 1974, the year I was elected Minnesota's secretary of state, my state was the first in the nation to implement election-day registration. Over 24 years in office, I supervised a registration process that consistently gave our state the highest voter turnout rate in the nation, with no increase in election fraud. On Nov. 5, voters in California will decide on election-day voter registration.
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