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1978 Year

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2002
Dame Sheila Sherlock, 83, a leading authority on liver disease who established study of the liver as a distinct discipline, died of undisclosed causes Dec. 30 at her home in London. Sherlock studied medicine at Edinburgh University and graduated at the top of her class in 1941. In 1951, at age 33, she became the youngest woman elected a fellow of the Royal College of Physicians.
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SPORTS
September 19, 2010 | Jerry Crowe
At his emotional low point, Cliff Frazier never would have imagined that losing a leg might liberate him. Lift his spirits? Not a chance. So, for more than a year, the former UCLA nose guard put off the inevitable, telling doctors that he wasn't about to let his long battle with diabetes render him an amputee. "I thought I'd get well," he said, "but I never did. " It wasn't until a life-threatening infection developed in his bones that he finally relented: his lower right leg had to go. Last winter, it was amputated.
NEWS
March 24, 1995 | From Reuters
Former Nigerian military leader Gen. Olusegun Obasanjo has been released from detention in response to a plea by former President Jimmy Carter but is restricted to his hometown, Nigeria's information minister said Thursday. "Because of the intervention of President Carter, Gen. Obasanjo has been allowed to stay at his hometown, but he is still restricted pending completion of investigation," Walter Ofonagoro said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1993 | BARBARA MURPHY
Judges Barry B. Klopfer and Richard D. Aldrich have been selected the outstanding jurists of the year by the Ventura County Trial Lawyers Assn. Klopfer, chosen from the Municipal Court, and Aldrich, of the Superior Court, were named judges of the year based on their performance on the bench. "These are people who have made an exceptional contribution in the past year," said David W. Long, secretary-treasurer of the association.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1999 | HOLLY J. WOLCOTT
Former U.S. Rep. Anthony Beilenson, the man labeled as the father of the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area, will be honored today when officials dedicate a new visitors' center in his name. From 1977 to 1996, Beilenson represented the 24th District, which includes portions of the Conejo Valley. He wrote legislation that allowed for creation of the recreation area in 1978. Last year Congress directed National Park Service officials to honor the former representative.
NEWS
March 5, 1998
Darcy O'Brien, 59, author of best-selling "true crime" books, including one about Los Angeles' Hillside Strangler case. The son of actors George O'Brien and Marguerite Churchill, O'Brien grew up in Hollywood surrounded by entertainment luminaries including John Wayne and John Ford. O'Brien fictionalized those days in "A Way of Life, Like Any Other," which won the P.E.N. Ernest Hemingway Award for best first novel in 1978.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1992 | ROBERT BARKER
Trash fees will climb to $12.30 a month for most residents starting today. Residents, however, will not officially learn about the $1.08 increase until bills arrive later this week because sanitary district officials plan to save the $8,000 it would cost to mail notices. Garden Grove Sanitary District General Manager Ronald Cates said the trash collection fee is rising 9.63% because the state has appropriated some property tax revenue special districts had received.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 2009 | Andrew Blankstein and Joe Mozingo
The first wave of slayings haunted Los Angeles in the mid-1970s. The killer slipped mostly unseen through the night, preying on older women who lived alone. He raped them and squeezed their necks until they passed out or died. On the 17 who were killed, he placed pillows or blankets over their faces. The second wave hit a decade later in Claremont -- five older women raped and strangled, faces again covered.
MAGAZINE
January 16, 1994 | AMY WALLACE, Amy Wallace is a Times staff writer. Her last article for the magazine was about gang-member-turned-hot-author "Monster" Kody Scott, "Making Monster Huge."
The big man with the heart-shaped cuff links sits in his spacious Encino office, a "Get-a-Woman-Flames-of-Desire" candle on his desk, a rubbing of Rudolph Valentino's headstone on his wall and two middle-aged businessmen in his clutches. The men have come to ask Jeffrey Ullman, the king of videodating, about buying a franchise. They have yellow legal pads on their laps, tassels on their loafers. Zany they aren't.
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