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1978 Year

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2007 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Sherman Torgan, who turned an adult movie house in Los Angeles into the New Beverly Cinema, an arty repertory theater that screens classic, independent and foreign films, died Wednesday. He was 63. Torgan suffered an apparent heart attack while on a bicycle ride in Santa Monica. He was pronounced dead at St. John's Health Center in Santa Monica, said Jeff Rosen, a longtime friend.
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NEWS
March 24, 1995 | From Reuters
Former Nigerian military leader Gen. Olusegun Obasanjo has been released from detention in response to a plea by former President Jimmy Carter but is restricted to his hometown, Nigeria's information minister said Thursday. "Because of the intervention of President Carter, Gen. Obasanjo has been allowed to stay at his hometown, but he is still restricted pending completion of investigation," Walter Ofonagoro said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1993 | BARBARA MURPHY
Judges Barry B. Klopfer and Richard D. Aldrich have been selected the outstanding jurists of the year by the Ventura County Trial Lawyers Assn. Klopfer, chosen from the Municipal Court, and Aldrich, of the Superior Court, were named judges of the year based on their performance on the bench. "These are people who have made an exceptional contribution in the past year," said David W. Long, secretary-treasurer of the association.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1999 | HOLLY J. WOLCOTT
Former U.S. Rep. Anthony Beilenson, the man labeled as the father of the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area, will be honored today when officials dedicate a new visitors' center in his name. From 1977 to 1996, Beilenson represented the 24th District, which includes portions of the Conejo Valley. He wrote legislation that allowed for creation of the recreation area in 1978. Last year Congress directed National Park Service officials to honor the former representative.
NEWS
March 5, 1998
Darcy O'Brien, 59, author of best-selling "true crime" books, including one about Los Angeles' Hillside Strangler case. The son of actors George O'Brien and Marguerite Churchill, O'Brien grew up in Hollywood surrounded by entertainment luminaries including John Wayne and John Ford. O'Brien fictionalized those days in "A Way of Life, Like Any Other," which won the P.E.N. Ernest Hemingway Award for best first novel in 1978.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1992 | ROBERT BARKER
Trash fees will climb to $12.30 a month for most residents starting today. Residents, however, will not officially learn about the $1.08 increase until bills arrive later this week because sanitary district officials plan to save the $8,000 it would cost to mail notices. Garden Grove Sanitary District General Manager Ronald Cates said the trash collection fee is rising 9.63% because the state has appropriated some property tax revenue special districts had received.
NEWS
October 28, 1993
Marcos Contreras, 15, is a sophomore at La Habra High School. The story of his arrival in the United States was prepared by Emma Fewell, also a sophomore at La Habra. I was born on Jan. 1, 1978. Last year I moved here from Sinaloa, Mexico. It was a very beautiful town; it was small, and there weren't nearly as many people there as there are here. My father, mother and youngest brother came with me, but we left my 10-year-old brother with my grandparents. He didn't want to come.
SPORTS
September 19, 2010 | Jerry Crowe
At his emotional low point, Cliff Frazier never would have imagined that losing a leg might liberate him. Lift his spirits? Not a chance. So, for more than a year, the former UCLA nose guard put off the inevitable, telling doctors that he wasn't about to let his long battle with diabetes render him an amputee. "I thought I'd get well," he said, "but I never did. " It wasn't until a life-threatening infection developed in his bones that he finally relented: his lower right leg had to go. Last winter, it was amputated.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2009 | Janice P. Nimura, Nimura is a New York-based critic whose work has appeared in Newsday and the Washington Post.
True fluency in two cultures is a privilege -- and a burden -- granted to few. Mary Yukari Waters is one of these. Her Irish American father met and married her mother in Kyoto, Japan, where Waters spent her early years. At age 9, she moved with her parents to California, where she still lives, while remaining close to her Kyoto relatives. Strikingly Caucasian-looking to the Japanese, more Japanese at heart than Americans suspect, Waters is unusually able to explain them to each other.
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