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1985 Year

BUSINESS
July 25, 1985
Baker International, the Orange-based oil-services company, said its third-quarter profits jumped nearly 21% to $23 million from $19 million while revenue increased a modest 2% to $471.5 million from $461.5 million a year earlier. Chairman and Chief Executive E. H. Clark Jr. said the gains were largely the result of cost-cutting efforts, improved efficiency and lower interest expenses due to declining interest rates. For the first nine months of the 1985 fiscal year, Baker had profits of $61.
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BUSINESS
September 17, 1985
Citing its start-up costs CompuSave Corp. of Irvine has announced that it lost nearly $4.8 million in its 1985 fiscal year ended May 31. The company went public in 1984 and there are no fiscal 1984 figures for comparison. Despite the loss, president Roger Miller said CompuSave executives are "extremely pleased with our accomplishments over the past year." The company manufactures an electronic, discount mail-order machine for supermarkets and other stores.
BUSINESS
December 31, 1985
Bucking the nationwide slump in semiconductor sales, Microsemi Corp. of Santa Ana posted record profits in both the final quarter and its 1985 fiscal year. For the quarter ended Sept. 29, the company reported profits of $1.1 million, 76% higher than the $627,000 recorded in the year-ago period. Sales for the quarter were $9.2 million, 7% above the $8.5 million posted the year before. For the 1985 fiscal year, the company had profits of $4 million, up 48% from the $2.
SPORTS
September 27, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The United States Soccer Federation wants to bring back a national professional outdoor league. Federation President Alan Rothenberg announced Wednesday that a 16-member committee has been appointed to develop plans for an outdoor league. The last nationwide professional league was the North American Soccer League, which folded in 1985.
MAGAZINE
November 10, 1991 | Mark Stuart Gill, Mark Stuart Gill is a writer living in Los Angeles. His last article for this magazine was "Losing It in Fat City."
THE MOUSE FORMULA The threat was delivered to Hal Z. Lederman's attorney: "Inform your client that if he continues to steal the formula, I'm not just going to sue, I'm going to take drastic action." It came from one Robert Murphy. Lederman, the marketing mastermind behind a hair-growth product called the Helsinki Formula, didn't let it bother him. He had been getting the same message for months.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2006 | Rebecca Trounson, Times Staff Writer
This fall 4,852 freshmen are expected to enroll at UCLA, but only 96, or 2%, are African American -- the lowest figure in decades and a growing concern at the Westwood campus. For several years, students, professors and administrators at UCLA have watched with discouragement as the numbers of black students declined. But the new figures, released this week, have shocked many on campus and prompted school leaders to declare the situation a crisis.
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