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1985 Year

BUSINESS
September 17, 1985
Citing its start-up costs CompuSave Corp. of Irvine has announced that it lost nearly $4.8 million in its 1985 fiscal year ended May 31. The company went public in 1984 and there are no fiscal 1984 figures for comparison. Despite the loss, president Roger Miller said CompuSave executives are "extremely pleased with our accomplishments over the past year." The company manufactures an electronic, discount mail-order machine for supermarkets and other stores.
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BUSINESS
December 31, 1985
Bucking the nationwide slump in semiconductor sales, Microsemi Corp. of Santa Ana posted record profits in both the final quarter and its 1985 fiscal year. For the quarter ended Sept. 29, the company reported profits of $1.1 million, 76% higher than the $627,000 recorded in the year-ago period. Sales for the quarter were $9.2 million, 7% above the $8.5 million posted the year before. For the 1985 fiscal year, the company had profits of $4 million, up 48% from the $2.
SPORTS
September 27, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The United States Soccer Federation wants to bring back a national professional outdoor league. Federation President Alan Rothenberg announced Wednesday that a 16-member committee has been appointed to develop plans for an outdoor league. The last nationwide professional league was the North American Soccer League, which folded in 1985.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2006 | Rebecca Trounson, Times Staff Writer
This fall 4,852 freshmen are expected to enroll at UCLA, but only 96, or 2%, are African American -- the lowest figure in decades and a growing concern at the Westwood campus. For several years, students, professors and administrators at UCLA have watched with discouragement as the numbers of black students declined. But the new figures, released this week, have shocked many on campus and prompted school leaders to declare the situation a crisis.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2012 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
Nicolas Berggruen travels more in three months than most people do in a lifetime. Dubbed "the homeless billionaire" because he prefers living out of five-star hotels to owning any homes, his business and nonprofit ventures this winter alone have taken him to Singapore, Tokyo, Hong Kong, Beijing, New Delhi and Zurich, with a side trip to Antarctica. So it's not entirely surprising to learn that Berggruen, who owns a Gulfstream IV, is not big on cars. "I can drive," said the energetic, boyish-looking 50-year-old.
NEWS
May 28, 1987 | United Press International
Federal investigators concluded today the 1985 New Year Eve plane crash that killed singer Rick Nelson and six other people was caused by a fire around a heater--not by free-basing of cocaine. The National Transportation Safety Board, releasing its report on the crash of the World War II-vintage DC-3, said while it could not establish that the blaze started in the cabin's gasoline-fueled heater, "There is no doubt that the fire did originate in the area of the heater."
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