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1988 Year

ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 1989 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON, Times Staff Writer
"We did it! We got one!" Kim was sitting at the edge of a small dinner party in La Verne, peering at the floor and twirling a string when at approximately 8:30 Wednesday night, Dustin Hoffman was named best actor for 1988 at the Academy Awards. The party was the final destination of a long trip, figuratively begun in 1984 when writer Barry Morrow met Kim, an autistic savant with extraordinary mental gifts, and decided to write the story that would become "Rain Man."
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 1989 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Times Staff Writer
Oscar show producer Allan Carr would have been proud of some of the folks gathered for hours outside the Shrine Auditorium Wednesday. Although most of the more than 3,000 star-gazers jamming the grandstands outside the theater's entrance had come to catch a glimpse of the glitzy 61st annual Academy Awards festivities, some made efforts to embody the glamour themselves.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 1989 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Times Staff Writer
While the Oscars telecast omitted its customary comedian host, comedy infused much of the presenters' repartee. Or, at least, attempts at comedy. The award-presenting couples--many of them married or romantically linked--engaged in plenty of banter, some of it surprisingly personal. When Goldie Hawn appeared on stage with Kurt Russell to deliver the best director award, she announced that they fit completely with the "couples" theme.
BUSINESS
March 13, 1989 | NANCY YOSHIHARA, Times Staff Writer
California manufacturers and farmers produced $34.7 billion, or 11%, of all U.S. exports in 1988, according to a forthcoming report that breaks down trade data by state for the first time. In 1987, exports originating in California totaled $27.8 billion and generated about 233,000 jobs directly related to the export business, according to the report by the California Department of Commerce. Trade specialists, however, challenged the statistics, saying that they were too conservative.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1989 | SHEILA BENSON
With the official slate of Academy Award nominations announced, a lid was shut on the film year of 1989. Movie lovers of the future will squint at these lists, whittled down further by the awards themselves on the 29th of March, to get the shape of the year cinematically.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1989 | DAVID REYES, Times Staff Writer
With only 6 days left before the beginning of the Tet festival celebrating the lunar new year, the offices of the Vietnamese Chamber of Commerce in Orange County's Little Saigon resemble a war room. Gone are the sedate pictures of lakes and scenic countryside that adorned the walls. In their place, Tet festival coordinator Tony Lam has hung maps, bulletin boards, flow charts and the names of an army of volunteers. A telephone rings, and Lam answers it: "Hello? Hello? Yes, this is Tony Lam.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1989 | DAVID REYES, Times Staff Writer
Dr. Co Long Pham, a surgeon in obstetrics and gynecology in Fountain Valley, is one doctor who is glad to see the Year of the Dragon draw to a close. "I've never delivered as many babies as I have during the last year. It seems that everyone wanted their child to be born during Year of the Dragon." And why not? Being born during the Year of the Dragon means a life of wealth, happiness and prosperity, according to Vietnamese refugees.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 1989 | NINA J. EASTON, Times Staff Writer
What kind of artillery are the Hollywood studios rolling out in this year's war for the box-office dollar? Big. Big budgets, big names, and biggest of all, big sequels. Like generals, studio executives usually are most comfortable fighting the last war. So as they prepare for 1989, Hollywood's major studios are relying on battle-tested artillery. As one executive-turned-independent producer put it: "Sequels to blockbuster hits may not be great creatively, but they ensure everyone's job."
SPORTS
January 11, 1989 | BILL PLASCHKE, Times Staff Writer
John Kruk, the Padre outfielder who in 1988 had the most disappointing season in his professional career, said last week that he lived the season in fear. Kruk said he was haunted by ongoing FBI surveillance amid an investigation and search for former hometown friend Roy Lee Plummer, who has been charged with beginning a spree of armed bank robberies shortly before moving into Kruk's rented home in San Diego following the 1987 season.
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