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1990s Decade

NEWS
December 21, 1989 | DENNIS MCLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 1990s, futurists say, will be a decade in which the technologies already in place will become highly sophisticated and refined: American families can expect to see a tremendous amount of computer and robotic technology in the home. Based on 35 interviews with futurists and experts as diverse as automotive designers and sociologists, we offer a glimpse into what is likely to be in store for upscale Orange County families by the end of the next decade.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2000 | Associated Press
Compared with the 1980s, America's public schools are doing a better job of educating children and preparing them for college, a recent study found. The report found that fewer students are dropping out, students are taking more challenging courses and more students with disabilities are finding their way into mainstream classrooms. The study, released last week, was conducted by the Center on Education Policy and the American Youth Policy Forum. It is based on two decades of government data.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2000 | ANN HORNADAY, BALTIMORE SUN
Two seminal events of 1989 helped set the course for film in the 1990s. First, a talky, micro-budgeted film by an unknown director won the audience award for best film at the Sundance Film Festival. It was subsequently bought by a little-known outfit called Miramax Films, ushering in the era of the independent film. "sex, lies and videotape," the little-engine-that-could, became more powerful than a speeding locomotive as Hollywood set out to find the next Steven Soderbergh.
NEWS
January 28, 1993 | CONNIE KOENENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
So your New Year's resolution was to cut down on your food bills. Which of the suggestions from three new books on thrift seems most practical to you? * Switch to the less expensive house brands at the supermarket ("The Penny Pincher's Almanac" approach). * Start baking your own bread and save the stale slices in a freezer bag for making bread crumbs (the Tightwad Gazette approach).
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1990 | ROBERT HILBURN
For the first time in its near 40-year history, rock 'n' roll is no longer the creative center of pop music. The important thing isn't so much how another pop form--the controversial, inner-city street sound of rap--has for the moment grabbed the creative momentum, but how rock squandered its power. There is still some experimentation and imagination in rock but the rate of progress is almost glacierlike compared to past eras.
BUSINESS
January 18, 1990 | MICHAEL FLAGG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As many as 600,000 more residents may move to Orange County this decade, and many of them will live in or near the central part of the county. Over the next 10 years foreigners will almost certainly wind up owning many more than the 35 major buildings they own now. And the boom in office and factory construction that marked much of the 1980s may slow down considerably as defense spending slackens in the 1990s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1990
" Health care: Access to health services is the largest single challenge facing Orange County in the 1990s. Access by low-income residents and near-poor and middle-income who do not have insurance will drain time, energy and resources from the county. Reproductive health care, in particular, is a problem: prenatal, abortion, delivery services and birth control." Margie Fites Seigle, executive director, Planned Parenthood in Orange County Top five issues of the '90s: Access to health services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1990
"Finding Solutions The biggest challenge in the '90s is clearly how we as a society are going to build a team and focus our energy on solving a wide array of social and infrastructure problems, in an environment of increasing regulation and complexity, with a fragmented and ever more diverse mix of people, with little feeling of ownership and little concern of the outcome other than how it might impact on oneself, with little leadership from the media or from other traditional groups,during a
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1990 | BILL BILLITER
Mayor Thomas F. Mays envisions this beach community going back in time in 1990. "Our redeveloped downtown will be made into a village, just as the town started out many years ago," Mays said. "The downtown will have a traditional Main Street with a village atmosphere. You can walk there and take care of all your basic needs, such as going to the dry cleaners, the dentist, the real estate office. We're making it into a traditional downtown."
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