Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollections1990s Decade
IN THE NEWS

1990s Decade

ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1990 | ROBERT HILBURN
For the first time in its near 40-year history, rock 'n' roll is no longer the creative center of pop music. The important thing isn't so much how another pop form--the controversial, inner-city street sound of rap--has for the moment grabbed the creative momentum, but how rock squandered its power. There is still some experimentation and imagination in rock but the rate of progress is almost glacierlike compared to past eras.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
January 18, 1990 | MICHAEL FLAGG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As many as 600,000 more residents may move to Orange County this decade, and many of them will live in or near the central part of the county. Over the next 10 years foreigners will almost certainly wind up owning many more than the 35 major buildings they own now. And the boom in office and factory construction that marked much of the 1980s may slow down considerably as defense spending slackens in the 1990s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1990
" Health care: Access to health services is the largest single challenge facing Orange County in the 1990s. Access by low-income residents and near-poor and middle-income who do not have insurance will drain time, energy and resources from the county. Reproductive health care, in particular, is a problem: prenatal, abortion, delivery services and birth control." Margie Fites Seigle, executive director, Planned Parenthood in Orange County Top five issues of the '90s: Access to health services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1990
"Finding Solutions The biggest challenge in the '90s is clearly how we as a society are going to build a team and focus our energy on solving a wide array of social and infrastructure problems, in an environment of increasing regulation and complexity, with a fragmented and ever more diverse mix of people, with little feeling of ownership and little concern of the outcome other than how it might impact on oneself, with little leadership from the media or from other traditional groups,during a
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1990 | BILL BILLITER
Mayor Thomas F. Mays envisions this beach community going back in time in 1990. "Our redeveloped downtown will be made into a village, just as the town started out many years ago," Mays said. "The downtown will have a traditional Main Street with a village atmosphere. You can walk there and take care of all your basic needs, such as going to the dry cleaners, the dentist, the real estate office. We're making it into a traditional downtown."
BUSINESS
November 13, 1990 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stock prices sink. The inflation rate rises. Recession is in the wind. Sound familiar? They could be dispatches from today's gloomy economic front lines--or, just as easily, those from late 1979 or mid-1981, as we slipped into the past two recessions. Looking at recessions past, say Wall Street watchers, offers investors--many with memories clouded by the long bull market of the 1980s--valuable lessons on how to act when the markets sour. "Many people are sort of shell-shocked here.
BUSINESS
November 13, 1990 | ALBERT B. CRENSHAW, THE WASHINGTON POST
Child care--and the fees associated with it--is an inescapable cost of living for two-earner couples and single parents with small children. Recognizing this, Congress has given parents a couple of ways to cut their taxes to make the burden a little lighter. The first option is a tax credit. Under the law, a taxpayer may take a credit against the taxes he or she owes for 30% of child-care expenses, up to a ceiling of $2,400 in expenses for one dependent or $4,800 for two or more dependents.
BUSINESS
November 13, 1990 | DAN AKST, Dan Akst is a Times staff writer
There was a time, not long ago, when it was still taboo to talk about money. The subject was right up there with race and class: pervasive, but unfit for polite dinner con versation. Then something happened. Things changed. And what I wanted to know was, when did it become OK to talk about money? Stranger still, how on earth did it come to seem mandatory? The answer turns out to have nettlesome implications.
BUSINESS
November 13, 1990 | CATHERINE COLLINS
Across the country, desperate sellers are hatching strange and creative plots to ensnare prospective buyers: special financing, decorator allowances, Caribbean trips. One hopeful seller even appeared recently in a major newspaper polishing his bait--a Rolls-Royce that would be thrown in with his $1.5-million house. As the number of anxious and motivated sellers grows, it would seem an ideal time for buyers to jump in. Indeed, both prices and interest rates are dropping.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|