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1994 Year

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1995 | ALAN EYERLY
Efforts to revitalize the city's tourist district, combat crime and develop retail and sporting complexes are among the accomplishments listed in the city's Progress Report for 1994-95. The annual report, which will be formally presented to the City Council on Tuesday, details 87 achievements by Anaheim during a fiscal year dominated by fallout from the Orange County bankruptcy. Accomplishments cited by City Manager James D.
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BUSINESS
April 25, 1995 | GEOFF BOUCHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Orange County's dwindling savings and loan industry, pushing low-starting adjustable rate mortgages while interest rates in general rose last year, needed its two biggest thrifts to help it record combined annual earnings of $240.6 million. Without American Savings Bank in Irvine and Household Bank in Newport Beach, the county's 11 other S&Ls would have posted a combined loss of $10 million last year.
BUSINESS
March 7, 1995 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Americans filing 1994 returns face significantly changed tax rules this year because of congressional actions taken in 1993. More middle-income seniors will pay more tax on Social Security benefits. Low-income individuals and families will qualify for bigger tax breaks. Business people will find it harder to write off the cost of meals and moving to chase a job.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1995 | DIANE SEO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time since officials began keeping records four years ago, Jews were targeted in more hate crimes and hate-related incidents in 1994 than any other group in Orange County, according to a report released Thursday. Overall, the number of reported incidents against all groups increased only slightly from 1993 to 1994. But the number of times in which there was a Jewish victim rose dramatically from 31 to 53, according to the Orange County Human Relations Commission study.
BUSINESS
January 31, 1995 | From Reuters
Japan's vehicle exports in 1994 plunged to the lowest level in 17 years, hit by appreciation of the yen and growing production at the overseas plants of Japanese auto makers, officials said Monday. The Japan Automobile Manufacturers' Assn. said vehicle exports fell 11.1% from a year earlier to 4.46 million in calendar 1994, the ninth-straight year of decline.
BUSINESS
January 30, 1995 | TOM PETRUNO
The mouse is roaring again on Wall Street. Troubled by its faltering image with investors after a series of setbacks last year, Walt Disney Co. invited nearly 200 analysts and money managers to Los Angeles late last week to hear a powerful message: Don't underestimate this $11-billion company's potential. Disney's bold presentation, punctuated by a surprisingly strong fourth-quarter earnings report issued late Thursday, had the desired effect.
BUSINESS
January 25, 1995 | TOM PETRUNO
Let's say your stock or bond mutual fund had a bad year in 1994. Was it bad enough to warrant your fund manager's resignation? In the normally genteel mutual fund business, forced resignations and outright firings of portfolio managers have been a rarity over the past decade. But in the wake of the performance egg the industry collectively laid last year, job security may no longer be such a sure thing.
BUSINESS
January 6, 1995 | TOM PETRUNO
Under the assumption that it helps to talk about it when misfortune strikes your life, here's what 1994 was like for millions of bond mutual fund owners: * Government and corporate bond funds posted a negative "total return" of 3.3% on average, as a plunge in bond principal values more than offset the funds' interest earnings for the year, according to fund tracker Lipper Analytical Services.
BUSINESS
January 4, 1995 | TOM PETRUNO
Wall Street's classic growth stocks retook market leadership in 1994 from traditional value stocks, and many investment pros insist that growth will win again in 1995. The problem: There's plenty of disagreement over what constitutes a true growth stock these days. The basic description of a growth company is one whose earnings growth is above average and fairly predictable.
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