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1996 Year

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1996
Some of the images can be read in an instant--a candidate stumping for the highest office in the land, an out-of-control wildfire racing across a dry and vulnerable hillside. But some images from 1996 are more complex, harder to read. There is the mother who greeted her son at the airport after the crash of TWA Flight 800. His best friend was on that fatal flight and, reunited with her son in Los Angeles, her face is a mixture of mourning and relief.
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NEWS
May 22, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
An appeals court sentenced 19 people, including the emir's cousin, to death for a failed 1996 coup. Twenty other defendants were given life sentences and 28 were ordered freed, according to a court order. Death sentences have to be approved by the emir, Sheik Hamad ibn Khalifa al Thani. The emir's cousin, Sheik Hamad bin Jassim bin Hamad al Thani, had served as economy minister and as a police chief. He was thought to be the mastermind behind the coup attempt.
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SPORTS
December 26, 1996 | Mike Downey
Nineteen ninety-six was a glorious year for glamorous teams, the New York Yankees, the Dallas Cowboys and the Chicago Bulls among them. It was also a year for famous individuals to sacrifice their titles, from Don Shula and Tommy Lasorda stepping aside to Mike Tyson being knocked flat. But when a homemade bomb exploded July 27 at an Atlanta public park, interrupting the first Summer Olympics held in any U.S.
NEWS
January 23, 2001 | JASON SONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a case being closely watched by local governments, the California Supreme Court is set to decide whether a 1996 voter initiative unfairly blocked a Fontana accident victim from seeking damages because he had no insurance. The appeal turns on Proposition 213, the 1996 initiative that prohibited uninsured drivers from suing for "noneconomic" harm, such as pain and suffering. The proposition permits uninsured motorists to obtain compensation only for damages such as wage loss.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 1996 | MAX JACOBSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There is bound to be controversy surrounding this year's top 10 list. Maybe I should have asked the writers from the Letterman show for assistance. In the end, I had a tough time deciding on at least half the entries. There is little room for uncertainty on a list this short, and several restaurants that I hold in high esteem just could not be included.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 1996 | Robert Hilburn, Robert Hilburn is The Times' pop music critic
This was a year of extraordinary transition in pop, when everyone from MTV to scores of anxious record executives proclaimed that the creative and commercial centers of music were shifting from the alternative rock and rap sounds that have dominated the '90s. Let's hope they're right. Even if no one seems certain about exactly what's next, the question should have a stimulating effect on the pop world, because the search itself reminds us of the importance of keeping pop relevant and fresh.
BUSINESS
April 12, 2000 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Calling all taxpayers. If you didn't file a tax return in the recent past, perhaps because you earned so little that you were not required to file, you might want to reconsider--in a hurry. The Internal Revenue Service estimates that U.S. taxpayers will lose $2 billion this year because they failed to claim federal tax refunds they were due from the 1996 tax year.
NEWS
December 26, 1996 | PAUL D. COLFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As its Man of the Year, Time has named Dr. David D. Ho, scientific director of the Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center in New York. Time's choice, which makes sense in light of the dramatic changes that Ho's "cocktail" of anti-viral drugs has made in the prospects of AIDS patients, still caught most so-called media experts by surprise. None of the 115 entrants in Media Industry Newsletter's seventh annual name-the-man contest guessed Ho.
BUSINESS
May 6, 1997 | DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fast-growing California companies drove the market for initial public offerings last year, and their stocks' initial gains were well above the national average. In California in 1996, a record 184 companies went public, raising a total of $7.3 billion. Computer, telecommunications and biotech firms led the way.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1996 | Richard Cromelin
WEDNESDAY Street Corner Justice. Former detective Marc Singer battles L.A. gangs, vigilante style. One problem: Crooked cop Steve Railsback stands in his way. (Sunset Films International) FRIDAY Bird of Prey. Jennifer Tilly, Richard Chamberlain, Lesley Anne Warren and David Carradine head the cast in the story of a man's quest to avenge his father's murder. (Northern Arts) Bound. A female ex-con and the mistress of a mobster plot to swindle the Mafia out of $2 million.
NEWS
August 24, 2000 | RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR and ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The National Transportation Safety Board on Wednesday recommended sweeping efforts to improve electrical wiring on airliners--particularly older ones--to avoid a catastrophic explosion like the one that destroyed TWA Flight 800.
BUSINESS
April 12, 2000 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Calling all taxpayers. If you didn't file a tax return in the recent past, perhaps because you earned so little that you were not required to file, you might want to reconsider--in a hurry. The Internal Revenue Service estimates that U.S. taxpayers will lose $2 billion this year because they failed to claim federal tax refunds they were due from the 1996 tax year.
BUSINESS
October 7, 1999 | Reuters
AirTran Airways, the low-cost airline once known as ValuJet, and SabreTech, a former maintenance contractor for ValuJet, have settled multimillion-dollar lawsuits over the 1996 crash of ValuJet Flight 592 into the Florida Everglades that killed all 110 people on board. Orlando-based AirTran said it will receive an unspecified cash payment and added that none of the parties to the lawsuit admitted fault or liability. Terms of the settlement agreement were confidential, it said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 1999 | Religion News Service
Members of Protestant congregations gave a slightly larger portion of their incomes to their churches in 1996 compared to the previous year, a new study reports. "The State of Church Giving Through 1996," a study by Empty Tomb Inc., a Christian service and research organization based in Champaign, Ill. also reveals a continuing decline in contributions to benevolences, which includes general denominational support, such as local and international missions.
SPORTS
January 7, 1998
* Glenn Adriatico, Jr., WR, Burroughs: With quarterback J.K. Scott now at Washington, Adriatico saw his production dwindle. He was selected to The Times' All-Valley second team after rushing 34 times for 184 yards and catching 46 passes for 695 yards. * Waking Bailey, Sr., DB, Kennedy: Bailey fit right into the San Jose State offense, becoming the Spartans' second-leading receiver with 34 catches for 380 yards. He also returned 11 kickoffs for 238 yards. * Ricky Bednarek, Sr.
BUSINESS
December 31, 1997 | PATRICE APODACA
A couple of recent government reports indicate that spending in Orange County has continued at a robust pace, but inflation remains dormant. A report by the State Board of Equalization showed that the county's taxable sales for all of 1996 totaled $32.5 billion, up 8.6% from nearly $30 billion the previous year. The increase outpaced the 6.7% rise in taxable sales for the state as a whole.
BUSINESS
December 24, 1997 | George White
The International Council of Shopping Centers said specialty-store sales for the week ended Dec. 14 at the nation's malls increased 0.6% over the same period a year ago. Shoe stores, whose sales rose 3.5%, were the best-performing category. Jewelry stores were next, with a 2.8% increase. For the holiday season so far, sales are up 2% over the same period in 1996, the trade group said. The results do not include sales at mall anchor department stores.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1997 | From Times wire reports
The Salvation Army raised $1 billion in 1996--up more than $250 million from 1995--putting it at the top of the list for the fifth straight year in the Chronicle of Philanthropy's top 400 charities. Americans donated $25.9 billion in 1996 to the nation's 400 largest charities, the Washington-based Chronicle reported. The American Red Cross placed second, raising $479.9 million, followed by the American Cancer Society, which took in $426.
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