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1996 Year

ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 1996
This year so many things happened that we could barely shoehorn them into one issue, but shoehorn we have. In this special issue, we've assembled bits, spotlights and homages to the high- and lowlights of the past 12 months. Here's where to find them. SPOTLIGHT ON...
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1995 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Turnover at the top will be the hallmark of politics in the San Fernando Valley in 1996 as seven incumbent lawmakers resign or are forced from office and a new generation steps up to the plate. Term limits are the catalyst for most of the coming change, with four of the seven incumbents leaving office due to Proposition 140, the measure voters approved in 1990 to bar California Assembly members from serving more than six years and state senators more than eight years.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1996 | Jack Mathews, Jack Mathews is film critic for Newsday
People lazily scanning the titles of movies scheduled for 1996 might think they had in their hands an old copy of TV Guide. A very old copy, a collectible, with listings for "Sgt. Bilko," "Mission: Impossible," "The Saint" and "Flipper." But then they'd come across the first sequel to the movie version of the TV reruns of "The Brady Bunch" and the eighth movie inspired by the reruns of "Star Trek," and realize they were simply seeing a continuation of Hollywood's homage to the classics.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1996 | RICHARD CROMELIN
Angela. In this debut by writer-director Rebecca Miller (daughter of Arthur), religious mysteries become two young sisters' key to the emotional life of their erratic mother. (Tree Farm) Angels & Insects. Entomologist Mark Rylance is plunged into a web of secrets when he returns to England from his research in South America and marries Patsy Kensit. (Samuel Goldwyn Co.) Anne Frank Remembered.
SPORTS
October 6, 1995 | MIKE DOWNEY
On the brink of elimination, their good deeds of September undone by two bad days of October, the Dodgers suddenly find themselves face to face with a winter's worth of hard questions. Will Tom Lasorda definitely return as manager? Is Mike Piazza's future at some position other than catcher? If Chad Fonville can't play shortstop, who can? What happens to Delino DeShields, if the weak-armed Fonville's best position is second base?
BUSINESS
December 26, 1996
The year 1995 was marked by a New Year's Eve-like giddiness celebrating some of the biggest mergers in the history of the entertainment industry. The year 1996 seemed like the morning-after hangover. A lot of heads rolled, and companies realized that their acquisitions were full of problems. And a former studio owner, who everyone thought was out of the business, came back with a roar by buying Leo the Lion.
BUSINESS
January 1, 1997 | TOM PETRUNO
The U.S. stock market ended 1996 with a split ticket on Tuesday, as blue-chip stocks tumbled while the broad market rose--a suitable final reminder of a year of very divergent, but on balance mostly bullish, trends on Wall Street. The Dow Jones industrials sank 101.10 points, or 1.5%, to 6,448.
NEWS
August 24, 2000 | RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR and ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The National Transportation Safety Board on Wednesday recommended sweeping efforts to improve electrical wiring on airliners--particularly older ones--to avoid a catastrophic explosion like the one that destroyed TWA Flight 800.
BUSINESS
January 3, 1996 | From Reuters
Chief economists for the Big Three auto makers predicted Tuesday that U.S. vehicle sales will be flat or rise modestly in 1996, as an expected cut in interest rates will be tempered by the cautious mood of debt-burdened buyers. "1996 is likely to be a good year for the auto industry but not a spectacular year," said Mustafa Mohatarem, chief economist at General Motors Corp., the nation's largest auto maker.
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