Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollections1997
IN THE NEWS

1997

SPORTS
July 8, 1996 | PAUL McLEOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After every Roller Hockey International game, hundreds of kids are allowed to lug hockey sticks, roller pucks and caps into the locker room in search of their favorite players' autographs. No one can say RHI, Ltd., doesn't know its fan base. Those little-known signatures may not be worth a lot at a sports memorabilia show, but they mean something to the youngsters who seek them. And their value is even more apparent to RHI, which stages its third annual all-star game at the Pond at 7 tonight.
Advertisement
SPORTS
December 27, 1998 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Silver Charm, who just missed winning the 1997 Triple Crown and finished second last month in the Breeders' Cup Classic, will open his 1999 schedule Jan. 30 in the $500,000 Donn Handicap at Gulfstream Park in Hallandale, Fla. Robert Umphrey, Gulfstream's director of racing, said he received a commitment Christmas week from trainer Bob Baffert to run Silver Charm in the nationally televised race. "Naturally, we're thrilled to have him," Umphrey said.
SPORTS
May 7, 1999 | From Associated Press
Major league owners will not approve Miles Prentice's proposed $75-million bid to buy the Kansas City Royals in its present form, a high-ranking baseball official told the Associated Press. Prentice, a New York lawyer who has pursued the team for almost two years, will be asked to re-form his group, the official said, speaking on the condition he not be identified.
NEWS
April 20, 2000 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After putting in a full day at his computer technician job, a 30-year-old Internet game player known as Ebaid went home, logged on to a game called "EverQuest" and started his night job. His game character donned armor, slapped on his sword and began slaying beasts so he could make some real money. Hail the rise of yet another strange creature of the Internet revolution--the professional online game hunter. Ebaid played for hours, slaying every computer-generated monster on his screen.
NEWS
March 3, 2005 | Liane Bonin, Special to The Times
Green eggs and ham, a cat in the hat and ... "unorthodox" taxidermy? If that last entry in the Dr. Seuss pantheon seems a tad "Silence of the Lambs" for your taste, take heart: Though "The Art of Dr. Seuss: A Retrospective and National Touring Exhibition" at the Sarah Bain Gallery in Brea promises to reveal the "secret" art of the famed children's book author, what's on display is simply grown-up stuff, not nightmare material. Not surprisingly, Dr. Seuss, a.k.a.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2001 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Owners of the controversial Riverside Freeway toll lanes are seeking to refinance the private thoroughfare in an attempt to lower their debt and eventually eliminate tolls for carpools, motorcyclists and the disabled. Greg Hulsizer, general manager of the 91 Express Lanes, said if the California Private Transportation Co. can refinance, the move will help push the 6-year-old operation closer to profitability.
BUSINESS
December 31, 1999 | From Reuters
The Securities and Exchange Commission said Thursday that it has charged two executives of American Telephone & Telecommunications Corp. with fraud for selling securities in the firm that purportedly was set up to offer long-distance telephone service via the Internet. The company is not related to telecommunications giant AT&T Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 2005 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
James Dougherty, a retired Los Angeles police detective who earned a niche in Hollywood history when he married a pretty teenager named Norma Jean Baker in the early 1940s, years before she became the iconic sex symbol Marilyn Monroe, has died. He was 84. Dougherty, the first of Monroe's three husbands, died Monday of complications of leukemia in San Rafael, Calif., his family said.
TRAVEL
April 24, 2011 | By Christopher Reynolds, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The San Fernando Valley is 260 square miles of suburbia. Actually, make that suburbia on nutritional supplements. And antidepressants. With perhaps a little cosmetic surgery south of Ventura Boulevard, where the big money is. Or maybe - now that it's grown to more than 1.7 million people in nearly three dozen cities and neighborhoods rich and poor - the Valley isn't even a suburb anymore. It begins just 10 miles northwest of Los Angeles City Hall, sprawling west to the Simi Hills, north to the Santa Susana Mountains, and east to the Verdugo and San Gabriel mountains.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2004 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
David Reimer, the Canadian man raised as a girl for most of the first 14 years of his life in a highly touted medical experiment that seemed to resolve the debate over the cultural and biological determinants of gender, has died at 38. He committed suicide May 4 in his hometown of Winnipeg, Canada. At 8 months of age, Reimer became the unwitting subject of "sex reassignment," a treatment method embraced by his parents after his penis was all but obliterated during a botched circumcision.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|