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1998 Year

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1999 | MITCHELL LANDSBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More young children in Los Angeles County were killed by firearms in 1998 than the year before, and one-fourth of them were slain by a parent who then committed suicide, according to a report being issued today by gun-control advocates. The alarming figures cut against the grain of a sharp, overall decline in gun-related deaths in the county and nationwide.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2001 | CAITLIN LIU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Valencia man was convicted Tuesday of the murders of two witnesses, but he was spared a possible death penalty when prosecutors withdrew their bid for capital punishment just before the verdict was announced. The dramatic conclusion to the trial of Kenneth Leighton, who now faces life in prison without parole, was the second strange twist in the case. Earlier, there were revelations that a prosecutor had concealed evidence from defense attorneys.
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SPORTS
December 25, 1998 | MIKE PENNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rewinding the greatest hits of the 1998 sports year--or, as the popular parlor game is known, "Six Degrees of Mark McGwire": McGwire hit 70 home runs for the St. Louis Cardinals, Who finally agreed to a four-year, $7-million deal with holdout rookie outfielder J.D.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2000 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Virtually every week a child is killed by a parent or caretaker in Los Angeles County, and the system for preventing these tragedies remains in disarray, according to a report released today. In fact, the report found, in 41% of the 1998 cases in which children were killed, county officials had been warned that the children were in physical peril.
BUSINESS
December 27, 1998 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For better or for worse, 1998 provided the most powerful evidence yet that the business and financial world has become a global village. Huge corporations, both American and foreign, geared up for international competition with a record-breaking torrent of billion-dollar acquisition deals. Financial crises raced from East Asia to Russia to Brazil, pushed along by speculators who moved money around the world with blinding speed.
BUSINESS
January 1, 1999 | TOM PETRUNO
Was it a bull? A steer? A bear? A chicken? All of the above? Wall Street historians may never agree on what to call the U.S. stock market's wild ride in 1998, but that's somehow appropriate: At several points in the year the market left just about everyone speechless. For sheer excitement, 1999 will find '98 tough to beat.
BUSINESS
February 10, 1999 | From Associated Press
A surge in productivity during the final three months of 1998 helped produce a healthy 2.2% increase in Americans' output per hour of work last year, the government said Tuesday, in another sign of the economy's exceptional performance. The advance in productivity at nonfarm businesses, reported by the Labor Department, marked a significant improvement over the 1.2% gain of 1997 and came close to 1996's 2.4% rise.
BUSINESS
January 19, 1999 | From Bloomberg News
American Express Co. said U.S. consumers spent 15% more this holiday season compared with last year, though they spent 14% less than they had planned. Shoppers polled by the financial services company said they spent an average of $1,148 on holiday expenses, including gifts and travel. More than half of retailers said the season was stronger than 1997's, with a third saying sales rose 10% or more. The survey was conducted Dec. 28-30 and involved 500 consumers and 275 retailers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 1999 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This was the Year of the Tiger, according to the ancient Chinese calendar. But in the San Fernando Valley, 1998 was more the year of all critters warm and fuzzy, plus a few cold and slimy. Into the news burst bats, cats, newts, greyhounds, horses, turtles, bulldogs and iguanas, as well as a "Yogi" bear, peacocks, mountain lions and a rattler. And even a tiger or two. The year began with a roar--of the human sort--for humane treatment of animals.
BUSINESS
January 5, 1999 | BRAD BERTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Who will be making headlines in 1999? The latest trends in the marketplace suggest that--with some exceptions--the newsmakers will be a markedly different cast of characters than graced this feature a year ago. At that time, the investment community--led by aggressive real estate investment trusts--was grabbing the bulk of coverage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1999 | MITCHELL LANDSBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More young children in Los Angeles County were killed by firearms in 1998 than the year before, and one-fourth of them were slain by a parent who then committed suicide, according to a report being issued today by gun-control advocates. The alarming figures cut against the grain of a sharp, overall decline in gun-related deaths in the county and nationwide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1999 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County's population rose modestly in 1998, with the strongest growth shown in unincorporated areas, a state Department of Finance report said. The county gained 41,100 new residents last year, a 1.5% increase, according to estimates in the annual report. With an estimated population of 2.8 million on Jan. 1, the county remains third in the state behind Los Angeles and San Diego. The state's population rose 1.6% from a year earlier to about 33.8 million.
BUSINESS
May 4, 1999 | LORENZA MUNOZ and KEVIN BAXTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The number of roles going to Latino, African American and Native American actors declined in 1998 for the first time in the six years, a Screen Actors Guild study released Monday found. The analysis of casting in film and television indicates that minorities are vastly underrepresented. But Latinos, who constitute 10.7% of the U.S. population, continue to be the most underrepresented ethnic group in both mediums, garnering only 3.5% of the available roles.
BUSINESS
March 9, 1999 | Bloomberg News
U.S. investors will pay a record $40 billion in mutual-fund-related taxes from gains generated by their funds last year, according to estimates from fund companies. That's up 18% from the $34 billion investors paid to cover 1997 fund-related taxes, according to an estimate Monday from Colonial Group Inc. "Taxes on mutual funds keep going up," said James Blakeslee, who oversees tax strategies at Colonial, a unit of Boston-based Liberty Financial Cos.
BUSINESS
February 15, 1999 | DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Venture capital investments in Los Angeles-area companies nearly doubled last year from the previous year, sending a strong signal that businesses here in cutting-edge industries are growing and creating jobs, according to a nationwide survey expected to be released today by PricewaterhouseCoopers. In Orange County, $265.9 million was invested last year, compared with $252.3 million the year before, according to the survey. Over five years, investments fell once, to $172.
BUSINESS
February 10, 1999 | From Associated Press
A surge in productivity during the final three months of 1998 helped produce a healthy 2.2% increase in Americans' output per hour of work last year, the government said Tuesday, in another sign of the economy's exceptional performance. The advance in productivity at nonfarm businesses, reported by the Labor Department, marked a significant improvement over the 1.2% gain of 1997 and came close to 1996's 2.4% rise.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1998 | KARIMA A. HAYNES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The battle lines grew a little sharper in 1998 over the future of public education in the San Fernando Valley. As the movement to break away from the Los Angeles Unified School District and create independent northern and southern Valley districts gained momentum, a number of opponents remained adamant about keeping the district whole.
BUSINESS
December 30, 1998 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Boys and girls made up a larger share of the moviegoing audience this year, which had a major effect on the profitability of some films. While the major studios have always known that young males (ages 17 to 24) were a driving force at the box office, even-younger viewers (ages 10 to 16), both male and female, made their presence felt in 1998. This largely suburban constituency had a major impact on the financial success of films such as "Rush Hour," "The Waterboy," "Dr.
NEWS
January 30, 1999 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Capping a year of sizzling economic growth that defied the financial turmoil overseas, the U.S. economy expanded by a surprisingly robust annual rate of 5.6% in the last three months of 1998, the government said Friday. That quarterly gain in the gross domestic product, a comprehensive measure of the nation's output of goods and services, was the best performance for any three-month period in 2 1/2 years. It also closed out a year in which the GDP climbed 3.
BUSINESS
January 19, 1999 | From Bloomberg News
American Express Co. said U.S. consumers spent 15% more this holiday season compared with last year, though they spent 14% less than they had planned. Shoppers polled by the financial services company said they spent an average of $1,148 on holiday expenses, including gifts and travel. More than half of retailers said the season was stronger than 1997's, with a third saying sales rose 10% or more. The survey was conducted Dec. 28-30 and involved 500 consumers and 275 retailers.
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