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1998 Year

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1998 | JULIO V. CANO
Completion of the Lincoln Avenue improvement project and renovation of the Arnold/Cypress Park loom as the top priorities for the city this year. The city hopes to reinvigorate a three-mile stretch of Lincoln Avenue beginning at the Coyote Creek bridge and ending at Valley View, said City Manager Mark Ochenduszko. Landscaping plans include a park-like environment on both sides of the street, with widening of the median and narrowing of the lanes.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1998 | JOHN POPE
City residents will see the completion of some public projects, including new parks, and the beginning of others this year. A 9.7-acre park on Pioneer Road in east Tustin, called Cedar Grove Park because it contains about 350 cedar trees, is scheduled for completion by early March, Assistant City Manager Christine Shingleton said. Construction recently began on a 5-acre park at Tustin Ranch Road and Heritage Way, which should be completed late this year, Shingleton said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1998 | CATHY WERBLIN
City officials expect to continue working to bring jobs and income to Garden Grove in 1998 through redevelopment and upgrading neighborhoods. City Manager George Tindall said officials hope to continue improving the quality of life through economic development and redevelopment programs, including efforts to bring hotels and restaurants to Harbor Boulevard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1998 | SUSAN DEEMER
Among the most pressing issues facing the city are proposals for four huge residential and commercial developments, completing plans for historic Casa Romantica and balancing the budget. Lusk Holding Co. plans to develop its 250-acre Marblehead Coastal project on the city's last large piece of coastal property. The proposal includes about 500 homes and a commercial center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1998 | SUSAN DEEMER
Finding money to complete the city's new community center is a top priority for City Council members this coming year. "It's something many people have been looking forward to for a long time," said City Councilman John Greiner. The city has broken ground for the first two phases of the project, which includes a senior center. But council members say it's important that a third phase, including a youth center and a gymnasium, start this year. But the city needs another $1 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1998 | MIMI KO CRUZ
An outdoor plaza that officials say they hope will serve as an anchor of the historic downtown is in the works and may be ready for use by next fall. City officials recently approved plans for the plaza at Pomona and Wilshire avenues, estimated to cost $1.5 million. Joe Felz, the city's supervisor of cultural services, said it will be an open public space where people could go to listen to bands or visit with friends, hold parties or sit and read.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 1998 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The second season of Reprise!, a series of semi-staged musicals introduced last year at UCLA's Freud Playhouse, will feature more than twice as many performances as last year. The season, announced Tuesday, will include "The Pajama Game" (May 6-17), "The Threepenny Opera" (Sept. 9-20) and the Gershwins' "Of Thee I Sing" (Nov. 11-22). The length of each show's run has been expanded from seven performances to 15 because last year's three musicals sold out.
BUSINESS
January 1, 1998 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Will General Electric sell NBC? Will Michael Ovitz resurface in the entertainment business after a year on the sidelines? Will Diller strike again? Could "ER" end up on WB? The entertainment business is full of surprise endings, making predictions a dangerous game. How many years did analysts predict the downfall of Gerald Levin, chief executive of Time Warner, who staged one of last year's biggest comebacks?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1998 | Jack Mathews, Jack Mathews is the film critic for Newsday
On July 1, when Michael Bay's "Armageddon" opens, we'll see an asteroid the size of Texas hurtling toward the Earth at 22,000 miles per hour. With any luck, it will land on "Godzilla." But the odds of that aren't good. In "Armageddon," NASA is sending superstar oil driller Bruce Willis into space to hitch a ride on the asteroid and plant a path-altering nuclear bomb in its belly. Willis can do this.
NEWS
June 3, 1998
Yeah, pep rallies are part of the deal, but we also gather in the stands to learn more about our world--from cultural and ethnic diversity to how to protect ourselves. Many schools held International Week assemblies, where we saw cultural performances and listened to stories about tolerance. Cornelia Connelly had a "Back-Off" gathering, where girls learned self-defense, and a forensic pathology lecture was a favorite at St. Margaret's.
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