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20 20 Television Program

NEWS
March 4, 1999 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, TIMES TELEVISION CRITIC
Dueling Monicas. Each was attractive. Each had experience with a higher power. Each was renowned for touching others. Each was on television Wednesday night. So much for the striking parallels between Monica S. Lewinsky and the Irish-bred angelic Monica of the hit series "Touched by an Angel," which CBS counter-programmed against the second half of Barbara Walters' two-hour interview with Lewinsky in hopes of putting a dent in ABC's expected huge audience.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1999 | ELIZABETH JENSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The story behind ABC News' heavily hyped interview with Monica Lewinsky tonight is turning out to be almost as fascinating as what the interview subject herself will have to say--especially since many highlights have already been leaked, from a tape that the network believes was stolen.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1998 | LESLIE BERGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
No one likes to feel redundant, especially household names. So ABC gathered a half-dozen anchors under one roof Thursday morning in a polished performance of network unity to launch the new version of its newsmagazine "20/20." The informal continental breakfast at ABC's sleek Manhattan headquarters wasn't much of an unveiling, however.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1998 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taking a page from NBC's playbook, ABC will combine its "20/20" and "PrimeTime Live" newsmagazines into one new program next fall that will have three editions each week, all called "20/20." ABC News Chairman Roone Arledge and ABC News President David Westin made the announcement Tuesday during the network's unveiling of its fall prime-time schedule before advertisers and media representatives in New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1998 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
CBS is considering creating a second night of "60 Minutes" for its prime-time schedule but the show's creator and his star correspondents are strongly opposed to the idea. "Certain broadcasts come along once in a lifetime--they don't come along twice in a lifetime," creator and executive producer Don Hewitt said in an interview Thursday. "We're all opposed to it," echoed "60 Minutes" commentator Andy Rooney. "It's a terrible idea."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1998 | T. CHRISTIAN MILLER and SCOTT GLOVER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Glendale hospital worker who allegedly told police he killed 40 to 50 people will take his case to a nationwide television audience later this week. Officials with both the syndicated news magazine "EXTRA" and ABC's "20/20" said Monday that they will broadcast taped interviews with Efren Saldivar, the 28-year-old respiratory therapist who purportedly confessed to killing terminally ill patients at Glendale Adventist Medical Center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1998 | T. CHRISTIAN MILLER and SCOTT GLOVER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Glendale hospital worker who allegedly told police that he killed 40 to 50 people will take his case to a nationwide television audience this week. Officials with ABC's "20/20" and the syndicated news magazine "Extra" said Monday they will broadcast taped interviews with Efren Saldivar, the 28-year-old respiratory therapist who purportedly confessed to killing terminally ill patients at Glendale Adventist Medical Center.
SPORTS
November 8, 1997 | Washington Post
Hugh Downs simply drew the line at Marv Albert. In an exceedingly rare public protest by a top television personality, the veteran "20/20" anchor refused to appear on the ABC program Friday, disassociating himself from the interview with the fallen sportscaster by co-anchor Barbara Walters. Downs had declared on "Larry King Live" last month that he would not interview Albert and, what's more, that "Barbara wouldn't do it."
NEWS
May 17, 1997 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
ABC network news executives killed a story about alleged congressional malfeasance that was to have aired Friday night on the newsmagazine "20/20," prompting a censorship charge from the journalist who originated the probe. The story--which was based on a new book, "Inside Congress," by journalist Ronald Kessler--included allegations of sexual harassment against Rep. Sonny Bono (R-Palm Springs) and of sexual activities by other unnamed lawmakers. Bono has denied the charge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1997 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an interview with Barbara Walters airing tonight, O.J. Simpson prosecutor Marcia Clark defends her work in the Simpson criminal case, saying that the racial makeup of the jury and the power of Simpson's celebrity made it impossible for the prosecution to win a murder conviction. "I still feel terribly pained" by the verdict, Clark tells Walters in an interview on ABC's "20/20."
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