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2000 Year

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NEWS
May 2, 1995 | ROY RIVENBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The social calendar for the end of the millennium--which is currently booked with lavish New Year's Eve bashes, assorted UFO invasions and, on a less cheery note, forecasts for the fiery destruction of the entire planet--is about to get a little more crowded.
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SPORTS
November 16, 2011 | By David Wharton
College football seemed so easy for Robert Woods. The bigger players and harder hits, the roaring crowds, he sailed through all of that to become an instant star at USC, catching passes by the dozen as a freshman. It was another part of the game — a part fans don't see — that took him by surprise. It was the peanut butter and jelly. "You think, coming to USC, they'll have food whenever you want but it's really not like that," he said. "I've gone four days straight of just sandwiches.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1999 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When it comes to millennium celebrations, New York has Times Square, Washington has the Mall, Las Vegas has the Strip, and Los Angeles has the Hollywood sign. At the stroke of midnight, that icon of the entertainment capital will be lit in a blaze of color and laser light. "You don't want to be in New York," joked Mayor Richard Riordan. "Who wants to see someone drop the ball."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 2011 | By Patrick McGreevy, Los Angeles Times
Under fire for spending $111,316 in taxpayer funds to feed themselves this year, state senators have decided to end the practice. All members of the upper house will be billed $2,000 a year to pay for stocking the coffee room and to cover their meal expenses when sessions extend into the lunch or dinner hour, said Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg (D-Sacramento). The five-member Senate Rules Committee, which Steinberg chairs, voted Tuesday to implement the new system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1999 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On New Year's Eve, Leo Crawford will have his beeper on, cell phone and car keys at the ready, and a bottle of aspirin at bedside. As Orange County's Y2K computer guru, Crawford has spent the last 24 months ensuring that he will grab the keys and not the aspirin. Maybe. "I'm optimistic," he said, "but I guarantee we will have missed something, some little thing that won't be life-threatening. But there's just too much to make an assumption that nothing's going to go wrong."
BUSINESS
September 19, 1999 | PAUL J. LIM
As technicians in Pittsburgh continue to check whether mutual fund firm Federated Investors' computers are free of Y2K glitches, a separate team of Federated analysts and portfolio managers is huddling over that other Y2K problem: What to do with clients' money in the days leading up to Jan. 1? At most fund companies, the latter group arguably has the tougher job.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2000 | ANNA GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Their slogan is simple and catchy, and succinctly expresses their desire to set themselves apart from and outdo Generation X: "We aren't just a bunch of zeros." The future weighs heavily on the Class of 2000 like no class since 1965. That was the year graduating seniors entered an era of civil rights protests and an escalating Vietnam War, and Time Magazine dubbed them "better educated and more seriously motivated than ever before."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1999 | ROBERTA G. WAX, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
King Dahl has quite an evening in store for the 400 people spending New Year's at the party he's planning in Thousand Oaks. The revelers, each dressed as a favorite character of the last century, will enter through a tent decorated with replicas of antique clocks, old phones and early 1900s lamps. From there, they will file through a 20-foot-long smoke-filled tunnel lined with shifting gears and wildly spinning clocks.
NEWS
September 23, 1999 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The failure of other countries to fix their Year 2000 computer problems could cause global disruptions that would "wash up on our shores," creating the potential for higher energy prices, supply shortages and even a mild economic downturn, a Senate panel said Wednesday.
BUSINESS
November 20, 1999 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Weight Watchers International has an unusual recipe for trimming down its potential Y2K problems: Get rid of its computers. The Woodbury, N.Y.-based weight control business on Monday will begin eliminating all electronic registers at its centers and revert back to a manual record-keeping system. Employees at hundreds of company centers will adhere to a strict regimen of pen and paper by Dec. 19.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2011 | By Janet Kinosian, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Absolute Monarchs A History of the Papacy John Julius Norwich Random House: 513 pp., $30 When preeminent British historian John Julius Norwich tells us in the introduction to his sweeping history of the Catholic papacy that his job is to give us "a straightforward single-volume history" of the world's "most astonishing social, political, and spiritual institution ever created," he's hit the nail on the proverbial head. The centuries-old Roman papacy truly is a universally unrivaled institution, and in dense detail, Norwich's book shows us the historic playbook.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2009 | By MARY MCNAMARA, Television Critic
Clear out all those books on tape. Mel Brooks' and Carl Reiner's "The 2000 Year Old Man: The Complete History" was released Tuesday, just in time to use holiday travel, or any other ambient free time, as an opportunity not only to laugh, a lot, but to explore the inner workings of what is one of the most famous comedy routines of all time. The three-CD, single- DVD set chronicles the iconic title character from his earliest beginnings, as part of a comedy routine Brooks and Reiner performed for their friends, to the 1975 animated special that may have been, among other things, a paean to Saran Wrap.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 2009 | Duke Helfand
The word of God has appeared in many forms over the centuries, as scribes and printers have transmitted holy writings by hand and machine. Now two Southern California universities are preserving some of this history with separate sets of rare religious texts that originated 1,500 years apart but share a common biblical thread. Azusa Pacific University has acquired five fragments of the Dead Sea Scrolls, the earliest known versions of the Hebrew Bible. The 2,000-year-old goatskin shards, featuring passages from the books of Exodus, Leviticus and Deuteronomy, will be exhibited in May at the evangelical Christian university in the San Gabriel Valley.
WORLD
August 8, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Archaeologists have unearthed a sprawling country villa believed to be the birthplace of Vespasian, the Roman emperor who built the Colosseum, they said. The 2,000-year-old ruins were found about 80 miles northeast of Rome, near Cittareale, lead archaeologist Filippo Coarelli said. Vespasian, whose full name was Titus Flavius Vespasianus, brought stability to the empire following turmoil under the extravagant Emperor Nero and a civil war among his successors.
SCIENCE
August 1, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II
U.S. archaeologists have found an extremely rare 2,000-year-old limestone cup inscribed with 10 lines of Aramaic or Hebrew script near the Zion Gate of the Old City of Jerusalem. Such ritual cups are common, especially in areas that were inhabited by priests, but usually they are unmarked or bear only a single line of text, such as a name, said archaeologist Shimon Gibson of the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, who led the dig along with James Tabor of the same school.
OPINION
July 21, 2009 | Rich Cohen, Rich Cohen is the author of "Sweet and Low," "Tough Jews," "The Avengers," "The Record Men," "Lake Effect" and the forthcoming "Israel Is Real: An Obsessive Quest to Understand the Jewish Nation and Its History."
Afew years ago, while walking through Mea Shearim, the Orthodox Jewish neighborhood of Jerusalem, I came across a strange poster. It pictured the Second Temple, the center of the world before the world was smashed in AD 70 by Rome, over a Hebrew phrase that means something like, "Jews! Watch what you say! For The Holy of Holies was destroyed not by Roman soldiers, nor by the Divine will, but by the gossip of the people." What could it mean, this talk of gossip?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 2000 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is it a fear of the millennium or just a rush to beat a barrage of anti-gun laws? It made no difference at JR's Range & Gun Room in Long Beach, where the year ended with a bigger bang than ever before. "It's been a madhouse around here," said the shooting range's owner, Steve Ditullio. "People have been lining up to play with their new toys: their guns. Some of them have never held a weapon before, and they don't have any idea how to load it."
NEWS
December 26, 2000 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Communist government of this hapless, landlocked country set a lofty goal for the start of the new millennium: to attract a million visitors with its "Visit Laos Year" promotion. But 2000 turned into a disaster on every level, and now even optimists believe that Laos will need far more than a year to undo a generation of mismanagement.
SCIENCE
February 14, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II
In Egypt, apparently even pyramids can be recycled. Archaeologists from the country's Supreme Council of Antiquities said this week that they had discovered a cache of 30 mummies dating from the country's 26th Dynasty in a tomb constructed during the 6th Dynasty nearly 2,000 years earlier.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2008 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
On Sunday, an army of ancient Chinese soldiers who were buried for 2,000 years will march into Santa Ana's Bowers Museum, the result of the largest loan of terra cotta figures and artifacts to visit the United States since their astonishing 1974 discovery. Actually, the 14 life-size human figures are already in town, having landed May 4 at Ontario International Airport and been transported, complete with police and helicopter escort, to the museum.
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