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20000 Year

IMAGE
April 6, 2008 | Audrey Davidow, Special to The Times
IT was a nail-biter of a month. But at last the news is in: The idle chitchat, the intense speculation and competitive jockeying are over, and families throughout the Los Angeles area are either exulting in victory or wallowing in defeat. It's kindergarten acceptance time, the make-it or break-it moment when L.A.'s top private schools mail their acceptance and rejection letters, then conveniently take off on spring break to dodge the hysteria.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2001 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
TV's latest reality series features 23 strangers from every walk of life who spend a year together learning about the world and discovering new challenges. No, not "The Real World." It's "Kindergarten." Geared for children ages 3 to 7, "Kindergarten," premiering Sunday on HBO Family, is set at the Upper Nyack Elementary School--about an hour north of New York City.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2007 | Carla Rivera, Times Staff Writer
Ask Fiona Whitney what private school directors think of her books that help angst-ridden parents choose the right campus, and she doesn't hesitate: "I think they love me," she says. "I haven't heard one negative thing -- and I'm really surprised." Whitney is the author behind the self-published Whitney Guides, which review Los Angeles' top private schools, blending facts and figures with amusingly opinionated descriptions.
MAGAZINE
December 18, 2005 | Andy Meisler, Andy Meisler last wrote for the magazine about psychotherapist/entrepreneur George Anderson.
Mark Pollock is a Napa-based environmental lawyer, a former Bay Area student radical and lover of fine food. Gloria Alvarez is a resident of Culver City who, for the last 33 years, has owned and operated Gloria's Cake & Candy Supplies, a tiny Westside culinary landmark jammed into a former American Legion Hall near the intersection of Sawtelle and Venice. Pollock and the seventysomething Alvarez have more than a little in common.
HEALTH
August 5, 2011 | By Amanda Mascarelli, Special to the Los Angeles Times
As students return to middle schools and high schools in California this fall, they will need more than fresh notebooks and apples for their teachers. Thanks to a state law that took effect last month, students entering grades 7 through 12 will need proof that they received a vaccine for whooping cough. The law was prompted by last year's outbreak of the highly contagious respiratory infection, which is also known as pertussis. Nearly 9,500 cases were reported in California, the most in 65 years, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
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