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20000 Year

HEALTH
March 8, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
Patients who are lucky enough to get a transplant for a failed organ usually face a lifetime on anti-rejection drugs, which are expensive, dangerous and not always effective. But in the future, those drugs may not be needed. A new study suggests that patients receiving an organ that's less than a perfect match can be protected against rejection by a second transplant — this time of the organ donor's imperfectly matched stem cells. Though preliminary, the new study is being hailed as a potential game-changer in the field of transplantation, a mystifying development that could offer hope to hundreds of thousands of patients who await or have received donor kidneys and depend on a harsh regimen of daily anti-rejection pills.
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MAGAZINE
December 18, 2005 | Andy Meisler, Andy Meisler last wrote for the magazine about psychotherapist/entrepreneur George Anderson.
Mark Pollock is a Napa-based environmental lawyer, a former Bay Area student radical and lover of fine food. Gloria Alvarez is a resident of Culver City who, for the last 33 years, has owned and operated Gloria's Cake & Candy Supplies, a tiny Westside culinary landmark jammed into a former American Legion Hall near the intersection of Sawtelle and Venice. Pollock and the seventysomething Alvarez have more than a little in common.
BUSINESS
May 18, 2013 | By Ronald D. White, Los Angeles Times
Call it retirement anxiety, or maybe recession obsession. For all of their married life, Patrick Webster, 63, and Susie Martin, 54, have been extremely frugal. Webster and Martin, who both work at Marymount College in Rancho Palos Verdes, have been stashing away their combined income at an enviable rate - more than 25% - for retirement. Together they have more than $1 million in investments and no debt. But rather than feeling reasonably secure about their financial future, they dread a return of hard times.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2005 | Ted Rohrlich, Times Staff Writer
In the quiet of New Year's Eve morning on the Sunset Strip, hours before partygoers celebrated the arrival of 2005, Brian Kennedy tried to give himself a present -- a new billboard that could bring him a million dollars a year. It didn't matter that he had no permit. Kennedy had gotten his start in the sign business many years earlier by going out at night and pasting movie posters on construction fences without permission. The scofflaw approach seemed to suit him.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2001 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
TV's latest reality series features 23 strangers from every walk of life who spend a year together learning about the world and discovering new challenges. No, not "The Real World." It's "Kindergarten." Geared for children ages 3 to 7, "Kindergarten," premiering Sunday on HBO Family, is set at the Upper Nyack Elementary School--about an hour north of New York City.
BUSINESS
August 9, 1998 | LIZ PULLIAM
Q: I'm curious about how the government enforces gift tax rules. I've often heard that you have to file a gift tax return with the IRS if you give more than $10,000 to any one person in a given year. But how would the IRS know about your gift if you chose not to file? A: For most readers, this is a theoretical concern--few people have to pay these taxes. And when they do, they are usually dead anyway.
BUSINESS
February 22, 2013 | Michael Hiltzik
Herbalife International says it's all about helping people "pursue healthy, active lives. " UCLA's Geffen School of Medicine likes to think of itself as being in the forefront of medical research and modern healthcare. But the curious relationship between these two supposed champions of healthful living should turn your stomach. Herbalife is the Los Angeles nutritional supplement firm that has become the centerpiece of a ferocious Wall Street tug of war. The major player is hedge fund manager Bill Ackman, who contends that Herbalife is a scam to sell overpriced products by fooling people into becoming Herbalife "distributors" by implying the business will make them rich.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2011 | By Karen E. Klein
Dear Karen: I'm self-employed and make $20,000 a year. The tax lady calculated that I owe $1,600. Can this be right? Answer: Self-employment income is subject to both income tax and self-employment tax. Ordinary income can be reduced by standard deductions and exemptions, but income subject to self-employment tax cannot, said Donald Lucove, a CPA with Lucove, Say & Co. in Calabasas. "The self-employment tax is calculated using 92.35% of self-employment income at 15.3%," he said.
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