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20000 Year

TV's latest reality series features 23 strangers from every walk of life who spend a year together learning about the world and discovering new challenges. No, not "The Real World." It's "Kindergarten." Geared for children ages 3 to 7, "Kindergarten," premiering Sunday on HBO Family, is set at the Upper Nyack Elementary School--about an hour north of New York City.
August 9, 1998 | LIZ PULLIAM
Q: I'm curious about how the government enforces gift tax rules. I've often heard that you have to file a gift tax return with the IRS if you give more than $10,000 to any one person in a given year. But how would the IRS know about your gift if you chose not to file? A: For most readers, this is a theoretical concern--few people have to pay these taxes. And when they do, they are usually dead anyway.
April 14, 2012 | By Jerry Hirsch, Los Angeles Times
General Motors Co. plans to bury the Chevrolet Avalanche. The automaker said the 2013 model year will be the last for the truck, which features unique styling that incorporates a mid-size truck bed and interior seating for five. It was meant to be a light-duty pickup truck that could tow, haul and still transport a family. "More than 580,000 Avalanches have been sold since its introduction in 2001, and Avalanche has won major awards and recognitions throughout its run," said Mark Clawson, Avalanche marketing manager.
November 25, 1990 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI
Q: My husband is taking early retirement from his job and will be getting $30,000 from his pension and about $20,000 in severance pay. Right now, our combined annual income is $48,000, and we are in the 28% tax bracket. However, if we get all this money in a lump sum at the end of the year, our bracket could jump. Is there a way to defer any or all of this income until 1991, or even 1992, when our income will be just my $20,000-a-year salary? -- D. T .
August 5, 2011 | By Amanda Mascarelli, Special to the Los Angeles Times
As students return to middle schools and high schools in California this fall, they will need more than fresh notebooks and apples for their teachers. Thanks to a state law that took effect last month, students entering grades 7 through 12 will need proof that they received a vaccine for whooping cough. The law was prompted by last year's outbreak of the highly contagious respiratory infection, which is also known as pertussis. Nearly 9,500 cases were reported in California, the most in 65 years, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
August 21, 2005 | Peter G. Gosselin, Times Staff Writer
Until a few years ago, Debra Potter made sure that her family could cruise the Caribbean, watch the NFL on big-screen TV and keep her elderly mother and in-laws at home in comfort. She did so by earning $250,000 a year selling more insurance than almost anybody else in the state of Virginia, virtually all of it disability and health policies that she thought put a safety net under middle-class and affluent families such as her own.
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