Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollections20000 Year
IN THE NEWS

20000 Year

BUSINESS
April 14, 2012 | By Jerry Hirsch, Los Angeles Times
General Motors Co. plans to bury the Chevrolet Avalanche. The automaker said the 2013 model year will be the last for the truck, which features unique styling that incorporates a mid-size truck bed and interior seating for five. It was meant to be a light-duty pickup truck that could tow, haul and still transport a family. "More than 580,000 Avalanches have been sold since its introduction in 2001, and Avalanche has won major awards and recognitions throughout its run," said Mark Clawson, Avalanche marketing manager.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2005 | Ted Rohrlich, Times Staff Writer
In the quiet of New Year's Eve morning on the Sunset Strip, hours before partygoers celebrated the arrival of 2005, Brian Kennedy tried to give himself a present -- a new billboard that could bring him a million dollars a year. It didn't matter that he had no permit. Kennedy had gotten his start in the sign business many years earlier by going out at night and pasting movie posters on construction fences without permission. The scofflaw approach seemed to suit him.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2011 | By Karen E. Klein
Dear Karen: I'm self-employed and make $20,000 a year. The tax lady calculated that I owe $1,600. Can this be right? Answer: Self-employment income is subject to both income tax and self-employment tax. Ordinary income can be reduced by standard deductions and exemptions, but income subject to self-employment tax cannot, said Donald Lucove, a CPA with Lucove, Say & Co. in Calabasas. "The self-employment tax is calculated using 92.35% of self-employment income at 15.3%," he said.
HEALTH
August 5, 2011 | By Amanda Mascarelli, Special to the Los Angeles Times
As students return to middle schools and high schools in California this fall, they will need more than fresh notebooks and apples for their teachers. Thanks to a state law that took effect last month, students entering grades 7 through 12 will need proof that they received a vaccine for whooping cough. The law was prompted by last year's outbreak of the highly contagious respiratory infection, which is also known as pertussis. Nearly 9,500 cases were reported in California, the most in 65 years, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
BUSINESS
May 18, 2013 | By Ronald D. White, Los Angeles Times
Call it retirement anxiety, or maybe recession obsession. For all of their married life, Patrick Webster, 63, and Susie Martin, 54, have been extremely frugal. Webster and Martin, who both work at Marymount College in Rancho Palos Verdes, have been stashing away their combined income at an enviable rate - more than 25% - for retirement. Together they have more than $1 million in investments and no debt. But rather than feeling reasonably secure about their financial future, they dread a return of hard times.
IMAGE
April 6, 2008 | Audrey Davidow, Special to The Times
IT was a nail-biter of a month. But at last the news is in: The idle chitchat, the intense speculation and competitive jockeying are over, and families throughout the Los Angeles area are either exulting in victory or wallowing in defeat. It's kindergarten acceptance time, the make-it or break-it moment when L.A.'s top private schools mail their acceptance and rejection letters, then conveniently take off on spring break to dodge the hysteria.
OPINION
April 2, 2006 | Xiao-huang Yin, XIAO-HUANG YIN, professor and chair of the American Studies Program at Occidental College, is author of "Chinese American Literature Since the 1850s" and co-editor of "The Expanding Roles of Chinese Americans in U.S.-China Relations."
ALL THE MEDIA attention on immigration has missed a critical part of the issue -- Asians. Although the majority of illegal immigrants in this country come from Mexico, U.S. and Chinese scholars estimate that more than 500,000 Chinese have been smuggled into the United States since the late 1980s, making them the second-largest undocumented immigrant group. Most of the illegal Chinese immgrants came from Fujian province in southeast China.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2001 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
TV's latest reality series features 23 strangers from every walk of life who spend a year together learning about the world and discovering new challenges. No, not "The Real World." It's "Kindergarten." Geared for children ages 3 to 7, "Kindergarten," premiering Sunday on HBO Family, is set at the Upper Nyack Elementary School--about an hour north of New York City.
MAGAZINE
December 18, 2005 | Andy Meisler, Andy Meisler last wrote for the magazine about psychotherapist/entrepreneur George Anderson.
Mark Pollock is a Napa-based environmental lawyer, a former Bay Area student radical and lover of fine food. Gloria Alvarez is a resident of Culver City who, for the last 33 years, has owned and operated Gloria's Cake & Candy Supplies, a tiny Westside culinary landmark jammed into a former American Legion Hall near the intersection of Sawtelle and Venice. Pollock and the seventysomething Alvarez have more than a little in common.
HEALTH
March 8, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
Patients who are lucky enough to get a transplant for a failed organ usually face a lifetime on anti-rejection drugs, which are expensive, dangerous and not always effective. But in the future, those drugs may not be needed. A new study suggests that patients receiving an organ that's less than a perfect match can be protected against rejection by a second transplant — this time of the organ donor's imperfectly matched stem cells. Though preliminary, the new study is being hailed as a potential game-changer in the field of transplantation, a mystifying development that could offer hope to hundreds of thousands of patients who await or have received donor kidneys and depend on a harsh regimen of daily anti-rejection pills.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|