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20000 Year

BUSINESS
August 9, 1998 | LIZ PULLIAM
Q: I'm curious about how the government enforces gift tax rules. I've often heard that you have to file a gift tax return with the IRS if you give more than $10,000 to any one person in a given year. But how would the IRS know about your gift if you chose not to file? A: For most readers, this is a theoretical concern--few people have to pay these taxes. And when they do, they are usually dead anyway.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2005 | Ted Rohrlich, Times Staff Writer
In the quiet of New Year's Eve morning on the Sunset Strip, hours before partygoers celebrated the arrival of 2005, Brian Kennedy tried to give himself a present -- a new billboard that could bring him a million dollars a year. It didn't matter that he had no permit. Kennedy had gotten his start in the sign business many years earlier by going out at night and pasting movie posters on construction fences without permission. The scofflaw approach seemed to suit him.
IMAGE
April 6, 2008 | Audrey Davidow, Special to The Times
IT was a nail-biter of a month. But at last the news is in: The idle chitchat, the intense speculation and competitive jockeying are over, and families throughout the Los Angeles area are either exulting in victory or wallowing in defeat. It's kindergarten acceptance time, the make-it or break-it moment when L.A.'s top private schools mail their acceptance and rejection letters, then conveniently take off on spring break to dodge the hysteria.
MAGAZINE
November 5, 1995 | Philip Fradkin, Philip L. Fradkin, a former Times writer, is the author of six books, including "A River No More: the Colorado River and the West" and "The Seven States of California: a Natural and Human History."
From time to time during the past two decades, I have returned to the headwaters of the Colorado River in the Wind River Range of western Wyoming for the pure, pristine joy of it. I can think of no better place for a great river system to begin its 1,700-mile descent toward the sea. I have hiked the trail from Green River Lakes five times, and my walk this June was similar to my first pilgrimage in 1973.
HEALTH
March 8, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
Patients who are lucky enough to get a transplant for a failed organ usually face a lifetime on anti-rejection drugs, which are expensive, dangerous and not always effective. But in the future, those drugs may not be needed. A new study suggests that patients receiving an organ that's less than a perfect match can be protected against rejection by a second transplant — this time of the organ donor's imperfectly matched stem cells. Though preliminary, the new study is being hailed as a potential game-changer in the field of transplantation, a mystifying development that could offer hope to hundreds of thousands of patients who await or have received donor kidneys and depend on a harsh regimen of daily anti-rejection pills.
BUSINESS
November 3, 2013 | By Donie Vanitzian
Question: Our board directors found the lowest earthquake insurance premium is with a 20% deductible, costing our homeowner association about $20,000 annually; they voted against raising monthly dues to cover it. Our 20 units in a four-level, zero-lot-line Los Angeles complex average $650,000 per unit and the structural integrity of the building is at greater risk because of our subterranean parking. Directors argue we've got over $150,000 in reserves and around $350,000 in combined money market and certificate of deposit accounts.
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