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20000 Year

BUSINESS
April 14, 2012 | By Jerry Hirsch, Los Angeles Times
General Motors Co. plans to bury the Chevrolet Avalanche. The automaker said the 2013 model year will be the last for the truck, which features unique styling that incorporates a mid-size truck bed and interior seating for five. It was meant to be a light-duty pickup truck that could tow, haul and still transport a family. "More than 580,000 Avalanches have been sold since its introduction in 2001, and Avalanche has won major awards and recognitions throughout its run," said Mark Clawson, Avalanche marketing manager.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2005 | Ted Rohrlich, Times Staff Writer
In the quiet of New Year's Eve morning on the Sunset Strip, hours before partygoers celebrated the arrival of 2005, Brian Kennedy tried to give himself a present -- a new billboard that could bring him a million dollars a year. It didn't matter that he had no permit. Kennedy had gotten his start in the sign business many years earlier by going out at night and pasting movie posters on construction fences without permission. The scofflaw approach seemed to suit him.
HEALTH
March 8, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
Patients who are lucky enough to get a transplant for a failed organ usually face a lifetime on anti-rejection drugs, which are expensive, dangerous and not always effective. But in the future, those drugs may not be needed. A new study suggests that patients receiving an organ that's less than a perfect match can be protected against rejection by a second transplant — this time of the organ donor's imperfectly matched stem cells. Though preliminary, the new study is being hailed as a potential game-changer in the field of transplantation, a mystifying development that could offer hope to hundreds of thousands of patients who await or have received donor kidneys and depend on a harsh regimen of daily anti-rejection pills.
BUSINESS
February 22, 2013 | Michael Hiltzik
Herbalife International says it's all about helping people "pursue healthy, active lives. " UCLA's Geffen School of Medicine likes to think of itself as being in the forefront of medical research and modern healthcare. But the curious relationship between these two supposed champions of healthful living should turn your stomach. Herbalife is the Los Angeles nutritional supplement firm that has become the centerpiece of a ferocious Wall Street tug of war. The major player is hedge fund manager Bill Ackman, who contends that Herbalife is a scam to sell overpriced products by fooling people into becoming Herbalife "distributors" by implying the business will make them rich.
NATIONAL
January 3, 2009 | Joanna Lin
Two decades ago, real estate mogul Randy Black turned this blip on the Arizona border into a boomtown when he opened the first of four casinos. Nearly 1 million visitors a year followed, and hotels, restaurants and stucco homes seemed to sprout from sand. "It seemed to be one of those things that 'Geez, it's just going great. It's never going to end,' " said Victor Kotalion, who left Las Vegas in 1990 for this arid patch off Interstate 15.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2012 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
The corner of 4th and Gless streets in East Los Angeles, once a center of prostitution and drugs, now houses a place of soaring dreams. Inside the gleaming Boyle Heights Technology Youth Center, a classroom of young people battered by hard luck or bad choices is filled with quiet, focused energy. Marcos Avila, a 19-year-old who was kicked out of high school for fighting, is learning to compare and contrast two essays. Vincent Guzman, 18, who left school after his brother was killed in a drive-by shooting, is puzzling over two-step algebraic problems.
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