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2001 Year

BUSINESS
December 31, 2000 | E. SCOTT RECKARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nationally, the tourism business is slowing. An economic "soft landing" has already begun for hotels, said PricewaterhouseCoopers, which predicted profits will grow at a slower rate in 2001 than at any time since 1992. Bear, Stearns & Co. recently downgraded ratings on the stocks of six hotel companies. But in Southern California, the outlook appears to be much brighter, thanks largely to the Feb. 8 opening of Walt Disney Co.'s long-awaited "second gate" next to Disneyland--California Adventure.
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BUSINESS
December 31, 2000 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The coming year promises a wild ride for most players in health care--not to mention consumers who depend on the industry for their health and well-being. In California, the greatest consequences for all concerned probably will come from the continuing troubles among the medical groups around which managed care in the state is organized. Dozens of groups have gone out of business or filed for bankruptcy protection over the last two years, and more are expected to fall in 2001.
BUSINESS
December 31, 2000 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After several years of modest but steady gains in membership and political clout, organized labor is bracing for potential setbacks under incoming Republican President George W. Bush. Unions poured money and energy into the campaign of Bush's Democratic rival, Vice President Al Gore, and stood behind Gore throughout vote recounts in Florida.
BUSINESS
December 31, 2000 | TOM PETRUNO
All those in favor of another big round of creative destruction, say aye. Say what? Creative destruction, a term coined by an Austrian economist named Joseph Schumpeter who died in 1950, has been the guiding force of the U.S. economy virtually since its inception, and especially in the last 10 years.
BUSINESS
December 31, 2000 | James Flanigan
The most important question to ask this New Year's weekend is not whether the economy will suffer a recession, but whether investments in technology and gains in productivity will pick up again after the current slowdown. There's no denying this is a worrisome period. Tight business conditions will greet the new year. Recession is possible as companies cut back spending on plants and equipment and lay off employees.
BUSINESS
December 29, 2000 | KATHERINE M. REYNOLDS, BLOOMBERG NEWS
America Online Inc. and Time Warner Inc. are not likely to get U.S. regulatory approval of their proposed merger before year-end, as they requested, and may end up having to pay millions of dollars for duplicate paperwork. AOL last week asked the Federal Communications Commission to approve the transaction before Jan. 1, to avoid the "substantial burden and expense" of filing separate financial documents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 2000 | MATT LAIT and SCOTT GLOVER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Los Angeles Police Department's corruption scandal will continue through the new year as investigators probe lingering allegations of misconduct, the LAPD implements costly reforms and city officials seek to settle lawsuits filed by alleged victims of police abuse. 2001 will bring at least two criminal prosecutions. Prosecutors are preparing charges against other LAPD officers but need permission from newly elected Dist. Atty. Steve Cooley to move forward, according to sources.
NEWS
December 28, 2000 | MICHELLE MALTAIS, michelle.maltais@latimes.com
Even if it often turns out to be an exercise in futility, many of us answer the call to tweak our lives and ourselves around this time every year. Maybe using the Web this year can help. One of the most popular New Year's resolutions is to get in shape. The Web is replete with fitness sites, whether you want to tone up here and there or do a complete body make-over. * http://www.fitlinxx.com gives you a couple of neat options.
BUSINESS
December 25, 2000 | Bloomberg News, Reuters
President Clinton's chief economic advisor said the U.S. economy will probably grow at a 3% rate next year, compared with an estimated 5.1% in the current year. Gene Sperling, chairman of the National Economic Council, said a White House report on the economy due in January will estimate that economic growth next year "is going to be less rapid. I think it's going to be about 3%." Sperling's comments, on television Sunday, were in response to comments from President-elect George W.
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