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2001 Year

ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2001 | RICHARD NATALE, Richard Natale is a regular contributor to Calendar
With the curtain going up on 2001 amid rising costs, labor uncertainty and decreasing ticket sales despite "record" box office, Hollywood is betting unusually heavily this year on so-called "tent-pole" titles, many of them sequels or big star vehicles.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2001
Amy. Alana De Roma plays the title character, a girl shocked into a world of silence by her father's death. With Rachel Griffiths, Ben Mendelsohn. (World Wide) * Buying the Cow. Romantic comedy pivots on a couple rocked by questions of commitment and true love. (Destination Films) * Downward Angel. A man penetrates a criminal organization, seeking vengeance for his parents' deaths. (Phaedra) * Faithless.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2001 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The impact of potential strikes later this year by writers and actors, as well as the endurance of the "Survivor"-driven invasion of so-called "reality" programming, dominated the discussion as the twice-annual gathering of TV critics and reporters got underway in Pasadena, featuring separate question-and-answer sessions with the Fox, WB, UPN and Pax broadcast networks.
NEWS
January 8, 2001 | LIZ PULLIAM WESTON
Last year should have scared some sense into the average investor. For the first time in years, diversification worked, and greed didn't. Cautious investors triumphed, and those who believed that "things are different this time" learned otherwise. Even if you survived last year intact, however, this is no time to rest on your laurels. Challenging conditions ahead and the unpredictable nature of markets make periodic reviews a necessity.
NEWS
January 8, 2001 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A year of big gains for previously overlooked and trampled-under stocks has done nothing to convince "value" investors that there aren't many more market lemons waiting to be turned into lemonade. Value investing--which focuses on companies with low debt, high cash flow and/or low price-to-earnings multiples--had a huge rebound in 2000 after being trounced by "growth" investing for two straight years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2001 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wearing a Motley Crue T-shirt and a scraggly beard, Brett Roland stood out from the crowd admiring Rose Parade floats on Tuesday. The 30-year-old Long Beach man leaned against a fence and smoked a cigarette with what looked like a faint sneer. Could he have been mocking one of Southern California's most hallowed traditions? "Nah, it's all right," he said. "Our mom's out from Texas, so we brought her out here."
BUSINESS
January 2, 2001 | TOM PETRUNO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wall Street today kicks off the first trading of the new year with high hopes that the worst is past for stocks. Of course, investors have heard that line plenty of times in recent months. The stock market closed out 2000 on Friday with losses in most major indexes, with the battered Nasdaq composite adding insult to injury by slumping 3.4% to 2,470.52 in the session--the first time in Nasdaq's 29-year history that it lost ground on the last trading day of the year.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2001 | Patrick Goldstein
The start of the new year is a time for predictions. And if Hollywood is bracing for one defining event in 2001, it's a potentially devastating writers' strike. Everywhere you look, movies are being rushed into production to beat the May 1 deadline for the strike. But what if the shutdown dragged on all summer? Would the fall TV season be kaput? Would the studios start renting out their back lots for bar mitzvah parties? Would strike jitters start making everyone in Hollywood act a little crazy?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 2001 | KAREN ROBINSON-JACOBS and ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Are we running with the bulls or will we be trampled by the bears? Will the San Fernando Valley economy, on a roll for the past three years, succumb to what some experts see as a national economic slowdown coming for 2001? Or will the region, which has recovered from the blunt-force trauma of the mid-'90s recession and the Northridge earthquake, shake it off and continue to steam ahead?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 2001 | ELAINE GALE and MAI TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Arriving just 37 minutes apart, babies born just before and after midnight marked the end of the 20th century and the start of a millennium. Paul Rihani, at 21 1/2 inches and a strapping 9 pounds, 7 ounces, became the last Orange County child born in 2000 at 11:24 p.m. New Year's Eve at Kaiser Permanente Anaheim Medical Center. Emily Diane Garcia rang in the 21st century at 12:01 a.m. New Year's Day at Garden Grove Hospital and Medical Center.
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