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2001 Year

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 2001 | ANNA GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The testimony was chilling and prophetic. Just two months before the Sept. 11 attacks, convicted Al Qaeda terrorist Ahmed Ressam testified in federal court that he planned to start a holy war against the United States by blowing up Los Angeles International Airport around New Year's Day 2000. The defendant told a jury that he had been trained at one of Osama bin Laden's Afghan camps and that other guerrillas planned to attack elsewhere in America.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2001 | SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a year dominated during its last months by terror-spawned grief and anger, it can be hard to remember that other moments--warming, chilling and amusing--also moved us. A man found a fortune in cash on a Los Angeles street and returned it. A young man lost his way in the snowy woods and was found. An urge for a cigarette earned an air passenger a jet fighter-escorted trip back to LAX--and a possible jail term.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2001 | SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Phil Bronstein, it was the year of the dragon. But for car-parts salvager Glen McElroy, 2001 had a turkey of an ending. Southern California lovers of animal stories had an arkful of weirdness to revel in this year, and none was more off-the-wall than the story of the newspaper editor and the toe-breathing dragon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 2001 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
In health care, 2001 was a year of great anticipation followed by dramatic disappointments. It was supposed to be the year that millions of poor children and their parents in California received health insurance through an expansion of the federal Healthy Families program. An infusion of cash from Sacramento was supposed to be on its way to the state's beleaguered trauma care system.
SPORTS
December 25, 2001 | BILL DWYRE
It's Christmas morning and we are sitting by the tree, untying and unwrapping. There are 10 packages and each represents decades of stature in the Los Angeles sports community. As we open, we realize that we have never quite taken the time to cherish such gifts. Our days fly by and we never take the advice of an old friend, the late Al McGuire, who always told us to celebrate the moment, to stop and smell the roses.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2001 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
For providing a remarkable moment of inspiration during a time of national gloom, Neil Young's recording of John Lennon's "Imagine" was the most compelling single of 2001. In both his choice of the song and in his moving performance of it on the telethon to aid victims of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, Young demonstrated the bold artistry that is a hallmark of great pop. The rock veteran could have performed one of his own songs of comfort and hope during the Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2001 | Robert Hilburn
In a year when music-industry power brokers turned to everyone but the weatherman in a desperate search for the next trend, it's fitting that Bob Dylan once again told us which way the wind should blow. "Tweedle Dee and Tweedle Dum," Dylan sings in the opening track of his "Love and Theft" album, and he could well be mocking the way much of today's best-selling music--whether rock, teen pop, hip-hop or country--sounds as if it were designed by sales department committees.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2001 | Christopher Knight
Here are the 10 most notable art exhibitions, activities and events of 2001, in chronological order: 1. Valie Export. In March, the Santa Monica Museum of Art's "Valie Export: Ob/De+Con(Struction)" focused on the Austrian artist's early feminist performance actions and Conceptual works, dating from the 1960s and '70s. It neatly ranked as the year's most interesting solo museum show saddled with the least felicitous title. 2. Bamian Buddhas.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2001 | KENNETH TURAN, Kenneth Turan is The Times' film critic.
Talk to filmgoers and they say the year just ending has been a particularly disappointing one. Talk to Oscar prognosticators and they say it's hard to come up with a list of five potential best picture nominees. Talk to critics putting together year-end lists and they say it's much harder to fill the top spot than Nos. 2 through 10. Put all that together and you have a picture of 2001 as the year the studio system let us down. Big time.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2001 | Nicolai Ouroussoff
For years, art institutions, corporate patrons and now even government bureaucrats have been mining architecture's growing list of international celebrities, bent on producing the kind of flamboyant icon that can up their cultural status. Architects call this the "Bilbao effect," a reference to the growing hype that has surrounded the profession's stars since the opening of Frank O. Gehry's celebrated Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain, in 1997. Not even the terrorist attacks of Sept.
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