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2004 Year

TRAVEL
December 26, 2004 | Jane Engle, Times Staff Writer
Americans this year took to the skies and highways in numbers not seen since 2000, the boom year before the bust that followed the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. Even business fliers came back. So let's celebrate with a list of who was naughty and nice this year to people on the go. For example, we paid more for hotels in New York (naughty) but flew there seemingly for pennies (nice). Here's my scorecard, or Santa's list, if you will, for the travel industry in 2004: * U.S. airlines were .
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2004 | Don Shirley
The Ricardo Montalban Nosotros Foundation acquired the Doolittle Theatre in Hollywood in 2000 and pledged to turn it into a professional center for Latino performing arts. Four years later, last May 8, the venue was officially renamed the Ricardo Montalban Theatre. But where are the artists? A $125,000 series of play readings briefly occupied the theater in June, after its christening.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2004 | Diane Haithman
When it opened its doors in fall 2003, critics hailed Walt Disney Concert Hall as a shining example of contemporary architecture. But months before opening night, neighbors of the undulating stainless steel structure at 1st Street and Grand Avenue were already grumbling that maybe it was a little too shiny.
TRAVEL
December 26, 2004 | Susan Spano, Times Staff Writer
I moved to Paris in March. Some would say my timing couldn't have been worse, with the value of the dollar eroding and French-American relations icy. But I think there was no better time for shaking up the gray matter and seeing things from a different angle, which is one of the great reasons to travel.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2004 | Lynn Smith
The sighting of Janet Jackson's right breast during the Super Bowl halftime show this year lasted only seconds, but there appears to be no end to the fallout. The so-called Nipplegate scandal launched a yearlong crackdown on indecency by the Federal Communications Commission, resulting in time delays on live shows, the revival of the V-chip, and record fines.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2004 | Mike Boehm
Government bucks for the arts were scarce in 2004 -- not even Laura Bush could get what she wanted. In January 2004, the first lady put her weight behind a new cultural wheel that was supposed to roll through all 50 states: She announced her husband's proposal for an $18-million boost in the National Endowment for the Arts, the biggest increase in 20 years.
TRAVEL
December 26, 2004 | Beverly Beyette, Times Staff Writer
If I were Bridget Jones, my 2004 travel diary might read something like this: Number of airport security pat-downs: Three, all discreet and all random. All were in the somewhat humiliating arms-out-to-sides position and were conducted by women wielding metal detectors; one used the back of her hands. (In response to complaints, the Transportation Security Administration this month said it would allow passengers to put their arms down once their upper bodies had been searched.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2004 | Shawn Hubler, Times Staff Writer
At the end of this year's most-talked-about novel, the author Philip Roth feels compelled to underscore a point. " 'The Plot Against America,' " he writes, "is a work of fiction." He then spends 27 pages demarcating the line between "historical fact" and "historical imagining" in his chilling, World War II-era what-if book. It's a line that, in years past, might have gone without saying. But in 2004, it turned out to be a major cultural theme.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2004 | Agustin Gurza, Times Staff Writer
Sadly, many Americans are likely to judge the state of Latin music by this year's terrible Latin Grammy telecast, a grotesquely distorted program that filtered Latin artists through the ethnocentric prism of American pop culture. The good news is that real Latin music is alive and well and available in the United States, if you look a little. Spain made an indelible mark on 2004 with the U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2004 | Robert Hilburn, Times Staff Writer
I want to start the new year with a clean slate, so let me make a confession about something I did during 2004. I fell so in love with "Van Lear Rose," the album country veteran Loretta Lynn made with rock star Jack White, that I may have gone from being a critic to a crusader. If so, it's not the first time, and it probably won't be the last.
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