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2009 Year

July 26, 2012 | By David Ng
Franz West, the Austrian artist known for his innovative sculptures and installations, has died at 65. West died in Vienna on Wednesday following a long illness, according to reports. West's sculptural creations were both playful and serious, accessible and yet intellectually challenging. During his career, West mounted shows at major museums around the world. A retrospective exhibition of his work organized by the Baltimore Museum of Art came to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in 2009.
January 8, 2014 | By Lauren Beale
The marital home of former Laker Lamar Odom and television personality Khloe Kardashian has come on the market in Tarzana at $5.499 million. Odom and Kardashian bought the house in 2009 - the year they were married - for $3.95 million. She filed for a divorce in December and resumed using her maiden name. The Mediterranean-style villa sits on three-quarters of an acre in gated Mulholland Park. Entered through a two-story foyer with a sweeping staircase, the 8,000-square-foot home features custom closets, mosaic tile details, a den, a home theater, seven bedrooms and nine bathrooms.
November 16, 2011 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
Martin Johnson , the lead singer and songwriter for Boys Like Girls, bought a home in Studio City for $737,000 earlier this year and recently finished remodeling it. The contemporary house, built in 1978, features canyon views, a bonus/entertainment room and a spa. There are two bedrooms, 21/2 bathrooms and nearly 2,700 square feet of living space. The band released the album bearing its name in 2006 and released Love Drunk in 2009. This year Johnson debuted some of the solo material he has written while the band is on hiatus.
May 14, 2008
Re "Teachers wanted -- elsewhere," May 10 It's unfortunate that good teachers are leaving California. What's also unfortunate is the state's refusal to admit what a drain on school budgets the cost of educating illegal immigrants has been. In the Southern California school I work for, we stand to have $40,000 allotted for our general fund in the 2008-2009 school year. Contrast that with the budget for the English learners program -- about $90,000. Until the root problem is addressed, California's schools will continue their downward slide.
November 16, 2009 | By John Keilman and Tara Malone
The dairy industry recently rolled out an expensive media campaign in praise of chocolate milk, a classic school lunch drink that's under assault for its sugar content. But as trade groups spend upward of $1 million to defend the drink, three fifth-graders have come to its rescue. A year after the school district in Barrington, Ill., banned flavored milk from its elementary- and middle-school lunch menus, the students persuaded administrators to give it another chance. "Kids weren't drinking the white milk," said Haley Morris, 10. "It's better to have the chocolate milk than nothing."
May 30, 2013 | By Catherine Green, Los Angeles Times
RIVERDALE, Calif. - Last year, the federal government gave farmer Dan Errotabere half of the water it had awarded him the previous year to cultivate his 5,200 acres. But he still managed to reap a yield as much as 25% higher. "I've got to do more with less," said Errotabere, 57, who grows cotton, tomatoes, almonds and pistachios among other crops on his family's ranch in the Central Valley northwest of Visalia. His trick? The increasingly popular drip-tape method of irrigation, which pumps water directly to a plant's roots.
December 19, 2011 | By Tracy Wilkinson and Ken Ellingwood, Los Angeles Times
It's fast becoming the money-laundering method of choice for Mexican drug traffickers, U.S. and Mexican officials say, and it involves truckloads not of cash, but of fruit and fabric. Faced with new restrictions on the use of U.S. cash in Mexico, drug cartels are using an ingenious scheme to move their ill-gotten dollars south under the guise of legitimate cross-border commerce. U.S. and Mexican authorities say trade-based money-laundering may be the most clever — and hardest to detect — way in which traffickers are washing and distributing their billion-dollar profits.
November 23, 2010 | By Jason Garcia
A few weeks ago, Disney introduced a new costumed character at its theme parks in California and Florida. He did not arrive alone. Duffy the Disney Bear debuted at Disney's California Adventure in Anaheim and Epcot Center in Orlando with an army of merchandise. Park souvenir shops began stocking three sizes of stuffed-plush bears and accompanying Duffy costumes, key chains, magnets and more. Additional souvenirs are on the way: Disney says it will have nearly three dozen Duffy items for sale in its parks within the next year.
January 31, 2014 | By Allen Barra
In July 2009, a year before his death at age 99, John Wooden was named by the Sporting News as the top coach in the history of American sports. Not many argued with the selection. Over his 29-year career he won 664 of 826 games for a winning percentage of .804. From 1964 through 1975 his UCLA Bruins won 10 NCAA championships, and UCLA's games drew higher TV ratings than most NBA games. Surprising as it seems, Wooden, arguably the most influential coach in basketball history, has never had a definitive biography until now. In "Wooden: A Coach's Life," Seth Davis, a senior writer at Sports Illustrated and studio analyst for CBS Sports, has written a virtual cutaway view of the history and evolution of basketball in the form of a biography.
February 12, 2014 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY -- Scores of people have been killed in brutal land battles in rural Honduras but authorities have failed -- or refused -- to investigate, possibly bowing to moneyed interests, a new report says. The violence in the Bajo Aguan valley has come from many sources, including private security guards hired by huge landholders making millions of dollars from  palm oil; government forces accused of abuses including arbitrary arrests and torture; and peasant groups, who contend their land has been stolen, according to the study.
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