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AUTOS
March 28, 2013 | By Brian Thevenot
Once the icon of stodgy sensibility, the Volvo station wagon went out of production after the 2011 model year. Now its back, as a “sports wagon” variant of the existing S60 sedan, the automaker announced at the 2013 New York International Auto Show. “The V60 builds on our wagon heritage,” Volvo Cars of North America Chief Executive John Maloney said in a statement. “And this time, we've added sophistication with the dynamic driving performance of a sedan.” PHOTOS:   Highlights of the 2013 New York Auto Show A high-performance version, the V60 R-Design, made its world debut Thursday at the 2013 New York Auto Show.
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BUSINESS
January 24, 2013 | By E. Scott Reckard
Hanmi Financial Corp. of Los Angeles said its profit more than doubled to $14 million in the fourth quarter as regulators lifted 3-year-old orders requiring the parent of Hanmi Bank to raise more capital. The end of enforcement actions by state bank regulators and the Federal Reserve enables Hanmi, once the largest of the many Koreatown-based banks, to focus on arranging a financial marriage for itself, Chief Executive Jay S. Yoo said in announcing the earnings Thursday morning.
BUSINESS
December 22, 2010 | By Jerry Hirsch, Los Angeles Times
Automobiles ? whether economy cars or the top luxury models ? are rapidly becoming safer to drive, an insurance industry trade group said. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety released its Top Safety Pick ratings for the 2011 model year Tuesday, saying 66 vehicles, including 40 cars and 25 sport utility vehicles, earned the group's highest safety ranking. That's more than double the 27 vehicles that achieved the group's top safety grade at the start of this year. Big improvements to roofs to protect passengers in rollover accidents contributed to a greater number of vehicles' achieving better rankings.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2012 | By Ben Fritz
With only three new movies in theaters during the second quarter -- one a 3-D re-release and another released on behalf of a separate company -- Paramount Pictures revenue plunged 29% to $1 billion. Thanks to sharply lower expenses, however, the studio's operating income dropped only 6% to $29 million, according to financial results released by parent company Viacom Inc. on Friday. Among Paramount's releases in the three-month period ended June 30, "Titanic 3-D" was a huge hit, grossing $343.6 million worldwide, which was split between the L.A. studio and partner 20th Century Fox. "Madagascar 3: Europe's Most Wanted" has taken in a strong $501 million so far, though Paramount keeps just 8% of revenue from the DreamWorks Animation release.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2012 | By Jerry Hirsch
Child safety seats are difficult to properly install in cars, according to an insurance industry research group, because of the design of most passenger seats. Joint research conducted by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety and the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute found that just 21 of 98 top-selling 2010 and 2011 model year vehicles have seat designs that are easy to use with child restraints. The low percentage was notable, considering that the auto industry is using a system called Lower Anchors and Tethers for Children - or Latch - that was intended to make it easier to install the safety seats.
BUSINESS
June 2, 2012 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
Theme park attendance rose nearly 3% in North America last year, according to a new report. But about half of that increase was because of one attraction — the Wizarding World of Harry Potter, which opened at Universal's Islands of Adventure park in Orlando, Fla. None of the major theme parks makes its attendance records public, but annual estimates are made by AECOM, a Los Angeles engineering and consulting firm. Those figures were used in a report released by the Themed Entertainment Assn.
BUSINESS
July 3, 2011 | By Andrew Leckey
Question: I am worried about my Sony Corp. stock. Do you see any kind of upturn ahead? Answer: This is a trying time for the consumer electronics and entertainment giant. Among its woes are the slow economy, a campaign of cyber attacks on the company's online video game service, and supply disruptions caused by Japan's earthquake and tsunami. Longer-term, Sony must adapt quickly and effectively to shifting trends. If it can't, it won't be able to command premium prices, despite its premium-brand reputation.
NEWS
August 17, 2012 | By James Rainey
Mitt Romney is really sick of talking about his taxes. But he won't release more than two years of returns (the 2011 return is said to be on the way), so people are going to keep asking for more. On Thursday in South Carolina, Romney took the bait of a reporter's question to talk about his taxes, certainly against the fervent wishes of Republicans, who would love to see the issue firmly tabled. “Over the past 10 years, I never paid less than 13%,” he said. “I think the most recent year is 13.6 or something like that.
NEWS
June 18, 2010 | By Carla Rivera
The California State University Board of Trustees on Friday approved a 5% fee increase for undergraduate students for the fall, taking action at a special board meeting in Long Beach. The fee hike translates to a $204 increase for full-time undergraduates, bringing the total university fee to $4,230 for the 2010-2011 academic year. Including campus fees, the cost for an undergraduate to attend a Cal State campus would rise to $5,097. The trustees also increased fees for graduate business and professional degree students by 5%. They also approved a 10% fee increase for doctoral education students and eliminated a cap on non-resident tuition for out-of-state students.
NEWS
November 7, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli
The federal government recorded a $1.3-trillion budget deficit in the 2011 fiscal year, roughly even with the previous year's shortfall. An analysis from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office released Monday showed that federal government took in $2.3 trillion while spending $3.6 trillion. Receipts increased at a faster rate than the growth in spending -- 6.5% versus 4.2%, respectively. The deficit as a share of the national economy actually decreased slightly from 9% to 8.7%, though that figure was still the third-highest since World War II. The analysis comes as congressional negotiators are working to meet a Thanksgiving deadline to put forward a plan to slash long-term deficits by $1.5 trillion.
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