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20th Century Fox Studios

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2000
Otis Chandler, publisher of the Los Angeles Times from 1960 to 1980, was honored Wednesday by USC for transforming The Times into one of the nation's finest newspapers. Chandler, 72, received the Annenberg School for Communication's first Lifetime Achievement Award for bringing "world-class status to Los Angeles as well as The Times."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1997
Charles Motter Dingler, son of President Calvin Coolidge's barber and a former minor league baseball player who coached Dodger outfielder Rick Monday in Little League, died in his Camarillo home. He was 88. Born in York, Pa., Dingler worked as a Capitol Hill page during the Harding and Coolidge administrations. His father cut Coolidge's hair, as well as predecessor Warren G. Harding's.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2003
Mel Gibson can't even get his pals at 20th Century Fox Studios to distribute his movie about the last hours of Jesus Christ's life. Gibson's film company, Icon Productions, is starting to look for a distributor to release "The Passion," which some Jewish leaders say is anti-Semitic in its portrayal of Jews during the time of Christ's Crucifixion. Film clips show hooded and cloaked Jews rejoicing as a battered and tortured Christ carries the cross to his death.
NEWS
December 12, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Anne Baxter, the granddaughter of architect Frank Lloyd Wright who built her own career acting in roles that ranged from the scheming ingenue Eve Harrington in "All About Eve" to Victoria Cabot on TV's "Hotel," died today, eight days after suffering a stroke and collapsing on Madison Avenue. She was 62. She never regained consciousness and succumbed at 10:50 a.m. in the intensive care ward of Lenox Hill Hospital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2014 | Valerie J. Nelson
Shirley Temple Black, who as the most popular child movie star of all time lifted a filmgoing nation's spirits during the Depression and then grew up to be a diplomat, has died. She was 85. Black died late Monday at her home in Woodside, Calif., according to publicist Cheryl J. Kagan. No cause was given. From 1935 through 1938, the curly-haired moppet billed as Shirley Temple was the top box-office draw in the nation. She saved what became 20th Century Fox studios from bankruptcy and made more than 40 movies before she turned 12. PHOTOS: Shirley Temple Black Hollywood recognized the enchanting, dimpled scene-stealer's importance to the industry with a “special award” -- a miniature Oscar -- at the Academy Awards for 1934, the year she sang and danced her way into America's collective heart.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1992 | AURIANA KOUTNIK
A movie set for a toy factory and part of a skyscraper being built on the Pierce College farm will be used in the filming of 20th Century Fox's film "Toys." Actor Robin Williams, Academy Award nominee for "The Fisher King" and "Good Morning, Vietnam," will play the lead character, a comical toy maker who attempts to save his father's business from a crazy uncle. "Toys" will be directed by Barry Levinson, who won an Academy Award for best director in "Rain Man."
NEWS
October 1, 1991
Herman Hill, the first black basketball player at USC and later a journalist and publicist who crusaded for civil rights, has died in Los Angeles after a battle with Parkinson's disease, a family friend said Monday. Hill, 85, died Saturday at home, said Brad Pye Jr., who is an aide to Los Angeles County Supervisor Kenneth Hahn. In the 1929-30 season, Hill became the first black to letter in basketball at USC.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2012 | By Richard Verrier
Media giant News Corp. is contributing $20 million toward the Motion Picture & Television Fund, giving the Woodland Hills charity a much-needed financial boost. The Motion Picture & Television Fund said in a statement Wednesday morning that News Corp., owner of the 20th Century Fox Studios and Fox Broadcasting, made the gift as part of the endowment campaign for the fund. The nonprofit group provides health and social services to active and retired entertainment industry workers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1996
Pardon Bob Dole for the equivocal tone of his second sortie against Hollywood, the front line in the contemporary cultural war. That the presidential hopeful found it no easier now than last year to gain solid political footing on the movies-and-society issue speaks less to his campaigning ability than to the deep ambivalence most Americans feel about popular culture and morality. Dole, the presumed Republican candidate, spoke Tuesday to an audience of about 200 at 20th Century Fox Studios.
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