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22nd Amendment

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1987
It is not often when I agree with an initiative of Ronald Reagan's. However, when it comes to the repeal of the 22nd Amendment, I enthusiastically support such an effort. As was evidenced in the presidency of Franklin Roosevelt, there are times when continuity of an Administration is in the interests of the nation. Hopefully, the process of repeal can begin soon. ROBERT E. TEIGAN North Hollywood
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OPINION
August 24, 2008
Re "The plight of the lame duck," Opinion, Aug. 17 Perhaps one of the worst gifts coming from the GOP was the enactment of the 22nd Amendment. Republicans' anger at FDR (he won reelection three times) led to the weakening of any reelected president. Politicians in Congress are much more likely to take the White House incumbent seriously if that individual has the capacity to run again for office. Presidents Eisenhower, Clinton and the Republican Party's beloved Ronald Reagan were to a large extent defanged in their second terms.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1986
Your editorial favoring the repeal of the 22nd Amendment chills my soul. Every day I read in your newspaper of people all over the world being subjected to monstrous injustice and abuse because they have no 22nd Amendment and no hope of getting one. What happened to that statement, "government of laws not men"? EUGENE CARMODY Laguna Beach
NEWS
August 17, 2008 | David Greenberg, David Greenberg is a professor of history and media studies at Rutgers University, a columnist for Slate and the author of "Nixon's Shadow: The History of an Image."
It's a regular occurrence in American politics. Sometime toward the end of a president's run, the most powerful political leader on Earth suddenly seems to slip from view. His term of office isn't over yet, but this figure who normally invades our thoughts every day turns into a ghost of his former omnipresent self. Why do we call outgoing presidents "lame ducks"? The term is London stock-market slang, circa 18th century, for a broker who weaseled on his debts -- someone who was powerless to pay up. Applied soon thereafter to American politics, it now refers to a president who limps but cannot fly. He counts down his last days roaming the White House in his bathrobe, waxing stoical about his legacy and furiously issuing controversial pardons.
OPINION
March 8, 2006
Niall Ferguson writes that if there were no 22nd Amendment, George W. Bush could run for president again, which would be a good thing for Democrats as they could put forward a candidate who could run against Bush's record (Opinion, March 6). That may be true. However, if there were no 22nd Amendment, Bill Clinton would still be president. RICHARD VIDAN Lawndale
NEWS
August 1, 2007
Veep: In a July 31 Op-Ed on who can run for vice president of the United States, the constitutional amendment establishing that presidents can serve only two terms was identified incorrectly, on second reference, as the 24th Amendment. It is the 22nd Amendment.
NEWS
August 1, 2007
Veep: In a July 31 Op-Ed on who can run for vice president of the United States, the constitutional amendment establishing that presidents can serve only two terms was identified incorrectly, on second reference, as the 24th Amendment. It is the 22nd Amendment.
OPINION
January 28, 2007 | JONATHAN CHAIT
THERE'S something about the upcoming presidential election that already feels terribly unsatisfying, and I think I've figured out what it is: the 22nd Amendment. The 22nd Amendment, of course, forbids presidents from running for reelection after their second term in office. Republicans enacted it in a fit of pique at Franklin Roosevelt and his supposedly dictatorial tendencies.
OPINION
March 8, 2006
Niall Ferguson writes that if there were no 22nd Amendment, George W. Bush could run for president again, which would be a good thing for Democrats as they could put forward a candidate who could run against Bush's record (Opinion, March 6). That may be true. However, if there were no 22nd Amendment, Bill Clinton would still be president. RICHARD VIDAN Lawndale
BOOKS
November 23, 2003 | Stanley I. Kutler, Stanley I. Kutler is the author of "The Wars of Watergate."
FDR needs little introduction, and, at one time, neither did Robert H. Jackson, author of this recently discovered memoir. Jackson stood prominently as one of the most impressive of the extraordinary array of talent surrounding Franklin Delano Roosevelt. A native of western New York and a rare Democrat from the area, Jackson served in various Department of Justice positions, including distinguished tenures as solicitor general and attorney general.
NEWS
June 9, 1998 | The Washington Post
Former Vice President Dan Quayle may want to recheck the Constitution before he speaks out about his party's plans to occupy the White House in the near future. The former senator from Indiana seemed to have forgotten the 22nd Amendment, which limits presidents to two terms in office, when asked about the GOP's presidential nominee for the election in 2000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1995
Victor Kamber's "Don't Mess With Our Constitution" (Commentary, June 26), complaining that Republicans have introduced 148 amendments since they became a majority, is an example of why the public places columnists just below politicians and bookies for credibility and accuracy. If Kamber wasn't just doing the usual Republican- or conservative-bashing, he could have discovered, with minimal research, that there have been 10,786 constitutional amendments proposed in Congress since 1789.
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