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ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2012 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
Movies shot in 3-D typically showcase dramatic action — superheroes scaling tall buildings, warriors rushing into epic battle, even the destruction of Earth itself. It's not a format that has traditionally lent itself to, say, a man gallivanting with flappers in a 1920s period piece. But that will change this year as two literary favorites get the 3-D treatment on the big screen. This December, director Baz Luhrmann will offer his take on F. Scott Fitzgerald's "The Great Gatsby," the famous tale of Nick Carraway and his adventures with well-off Long Islanders in the roaring '20s.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2012
The sci-fi action flick "Battleship" got off to a solid start overseas this past weekend, grossing $58 million in 26 foreign countries. That sounds good — until you compare it with the receipts for "Titanic 3D," which has collected that much in China alone. Indeed, the revamped version of James Cameron's 1997 classic posted the biggest opening of all time in China, surpassing the $55-million debut of "Transformers: Dark of the Moon" last year. The film starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet dominated at the international box office this weekend, raking in $88.2 million from 69 foreign markets and bringing its total abroad to $146.5 million, according to distributor 20th Century Fox. Upon its release in China 14 years ago, "Titanic" played in only 180 theaters, compared with the 3,500 locations the 3-D reissue screened in over the weekend.
SCIENCE
December 8, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
These bots were made for walking - out of rat heart cells and hydrogel. Scientists have paired these unlikely ingredients to create simple biological machines that look something like a front-loaded inchworm and can step their way through fluid at speeds up to 236 micrometers per second. Bioengineers working at the boundary between organics and mechanics dream of harnessing the power of biology's nuts and bolts. Some have built tweezers out of DNA; others have made sensors by sticking bacteria on a chip.
NEWS
August 25, 2005 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
SOMEWHERE between a dorm-room poster of Monet's waterlilies and the Robert Rauschenberg painting owned by Eli Broad is another level -- the beginnings of an art collection that can be built by anyone with a few grand to spend.
BUSINESS
January 9, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
LAS VEGAS -- Even though 3D printing is all the rage at the Consumer Electronics Show, many people outside the industry are still puzzled by all the fuss. "Explain 3D printers to me. Why are they useful?" one non-techie friend of mine tweeted me this week, after I posted a picture of a 3D printer at the show. By the way, there are 28 3D printing exhibitors at the show, up from just eight in 2013, according to Gary Shapiro, the president and chief executive of the Consumer Electronics Assn., which organizes the show.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2011
'A Very Harold & Kumar 3D Christmas' MPAA rating: R for strong crude and sexual content, graphic nudity, pervasive language, drug use and some violence Running time: 1 hour, 30 minutes Playing: In general release
BUSINESS
April 16, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
Everywhere you look these days, something is jumping off a screen at you in 3-D. It's in movies new and retro. It's on YouTube . It's trying to find its way into your home entertainment setup. And there are efforts to get 3-D literally into consumers' hands. Tech Now got a first U.S. look at a tablet that offers hand-held 3-D viewing without glasses. Matt Liszt of MasterImage 3D brought over a reference tablet they had just shown at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Spain.
BUSINESS
January 21, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Can you program a 3-D printer to build an entire building? Architect Janjaap Ruijssenaars wants to try. The Dutch architect has laid out plans for Landscape House -- a structure that looks like a Mobius strip or "one surface folded over into an endless band," as he  describes it. To build it, he plans to use a 3-D printer called D-Shape that will lay down thin layers of sand that combine with a bonding agent to create a material that is...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2012 | By Joe Flint
The main problem with owning a network that specializes in 3D is that there isn't a ton of 3D programming around to fill the schedule. With that in mind, 3Net -- the 3D cable channel owned by Sony, Discovery and IMAX -- have created an in-house production company to make original 3D content. “With the industry now struggling to keep pace with the rapidly accelerating consumer demand for 3D programming across multiple platforms...the formation of a world-class production studio to help fill both the 3D and ultra-high-definition content voids became a logical next step in our evolution as a global player in the entertainment arena,” said Tom Cosgrove, president of 3Net.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2010 | By John Horn
It worked for classic children's literature. The signs look equally promising for Greek mythology. Hollywood's stereoscopic crusade has led several studios to rush to retrofit two-dimensional movies into 3-D releases. While some smaller companies dabbled in the conversion strategy before with mixed results -- such as 2007's " Battle for Terra" -- so far only two studios have finished rebooting movies originally conceived and shot as 2-D titles. The first, Tim Burton's "Alice in Wonderland," is a massive hit, with a domestic gross approaching $300 million.
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