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3000 Year

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1999 | LESLIE WRIGHT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Suzanne Rosen converted to Judaism 20 years ago, the intricate rituals of the Passover Seder were new and exciting. She carefully followed her mother-in-law's directions to prepare her kitchen for the feast commemorating the liberation of Jews from slavery and their exodus from Egypt 3,000 years ago. She emptied her cabinets of all dishes, pots, pans, utensils and food. She scrubbed the refrigerator, cleaned the stove with high heat and relined every shelf.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1998 | FRED ALVAREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Al and Janet Shusta are what you call hard-core lottery players. For as long as the game has been around, the retirees have been dropping up to $300 a month on a chance at striking it rich. So you think they would know exactly how they were going to spend their winnings after splitting Saturday's $20-million SuperLotto jackpot with a San Fernando Valley man. Truth is, they haven't a clue. They are thinking of traveling, although they have no firm plans.
NEWS
October 5, 1997 | DAVID KINNEY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The cardiologist, who's also a published art history buff, reached Exhibit No. 251 and felt his heart jump. Before him sat a ceramic vessel, just 7 inches tall, crafted 3,000 years ago. The male figurine wore a helmet of hair, a flat nose and fat lips. Its body appeared split down the middle, and three large arteries shot from its shoulders. "My god," Dr. Gordon Bendersky said to himself that day in the Art Museum at Princeton University. "That's the oldest image of the heart."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1997 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A team led by archeologist James E. Brady of George Washington University has found at least three burial caves in the region--one in 1992 and two this past summer--as well as an enormous underground gathering place that the team dubbed "the Superdome of caves" and another cave apparently used for religious rites.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1996
Human remains found at the Texaco Refinery in Wilmington were identified as those of a small child who belonged to a 3,000-year-old Native American tribe, according to the coroner's office. Construction at the refinery was suspended last week when workers recovered what appeared to be a skull and several long bones while digging a trench. Texaco officials said the area had been paved for several decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 1995 | FRANCES HALPERN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Noah ben Shea of Santa Barbara, who charmed readers with his enormously successful books about Jacob the Baker, will read from his just published "The Word: A Spiritual Sourcebook," from 2 to 4 p.m. Sunday at the Ventura Bookstore, 522 E. Main St. "The Word" is a sweeping collection of quotations and teachings spanning more than 3,000 years of Jewish wisdom.
NEWS
March 8, 1994 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a rocky hilltop in the Holy Land, a slight, bearded American Jew named Joe Bazer has found a place where his family can live a religious life--and make a political statement that reverberates across the Middle East. "This is one of our most important spots," said Bazer, wearing a 9-millimeter pistol on his belt and gazing dreamily from his neighborhood of modern, red-roofed homes onto the ruins of ancient Shiloh.
NEWS
August 23, 1992 | ARIEH O'SULLIVAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
An exhibit traces 3,000 years of history through the food served in Jerusalem, but omits the most famous meal because no one could agree on what Jesus and his disciples ate at the Last Supper. "Eating in Jerusalem," housed in the dungeon of the Tower of David inside the city's ancient walls, re-creates six meals ranging in time from King Solomon to German pilgrims of the early 20th Century. "To better understand someone--a writer, a politician--eat with them," said curator Sherry Ansky.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1992 | JANICE L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Inca goes back to the music of the good old days for its performance tonight in San Juan Capistrano, the Los Angeles-based ensemble will go waaaaaaaaay back. In addition to the familiar Peruvian folk tune "El Condor Pasa," a pop hit in 1970 for Simon and Garfunkel, the group's repertoire includes 3,000-year-old music and dances from Peru's ancient Aymara and Quechua civilizations, which existed between 900 BC and AD 1530.
NEWS
April 21, 1992 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The Los Angeles-based team that discovered the fabled Arabian city of Ubar, the long-lost "Queen of the Frankincense Trade," has unearthed a second, larger city that was apparently the administrative center of trade in the valuable spice, researchers announced Monday.
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