Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollections37th President
IN THE NEWS

37th President

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2013 | By Rebecca Keegan
Audiotape of a casual phone conversation in the new documentary "Our Nixon" reveals a startling fact about President Nixon and his staff: that they were unfamiliar with the most popular television program in America at the time, "All in the Family. " In the call, White House chief of staff H.R. Haldeman seemed to think the influential sitcom was a panel show, and Nixon thought it was a movie that villainized a "square hard hat" (Archie Bunker). Forty-one years after the Watergate scandal first broke, the seemingly prosaic detail about the Nixon White House's lack of pop culture awareness provides the kind of context that often gets lost when the first draft of history is written.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2013 | By Rebecca Keegan
Audiotape of a casual phone conversation in the new documentary "Our Nixon" reveals a startling fact about President Nixon and his staff: that they were unfamiliar with the most popular television program in America at the time, "All in the Family. " In the call, White House chief of staff H.R. Haldeman seemed to think the influential sitcom was a panel show, and Nixon thought it was a movie that villainized a "square hard hat" (Archie Bunker). Forty-one years after the Watergate scandal first broke, the seemingly prosaic detail about the Nixon White House's lack of pop culture awareness provides the kind of context that often gets lost when the first draft of history is written.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2013 | By Jean Merl, Los Angeles Times
Paul J. Carter was 9 when Richard M. Nixon resigned the presidency in 1974, watching the televised speech with his dad, a loyal Republican who had come home from work early for the event. "I … didn't grasp the magnitude of it," said Carter, now 47 and a lawyer in Long Beach. Nearly four decades later, the boy's puzzlement over the nation's 37th president had evolved into a grown-up project, "Native Son Richard Nixon's Southern California: My Life on a Map!" Made like a guide to Hollywood stars' homes, the fold-out map is an illustrated romp through the life of the only White House occupant born and raised in Southern California.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2013
While it's one memory lane some may rather not stroll down, the divisive near-term-and-a-half of America's disgraced 37th president is recounted with economy, focus and, at times, pitch-dark humor in the documentary "Our Nixon. " Director Penny Lane, with an able assist from editor Francisco Bello, offers an absorbing snapshot of Richard M. Nixon's fraught, occasionally triumphant time in the Oval Office, culled largely from more than 500 reels of long-forgotten Super-8 home movie footage shot by Nixon aides - and eventual Watergate break-in conspirators - John Ehrlichman, H.R Haldeman and Dwight Chapin.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 1995 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sharon Smith tried to explain the dark complexity at the center of "Nixon" to her daughter, Angela, but all the Irvine 13-year-old could think of was how creepy it seemed. "He looked weird," Angela said, referring to Anthony Hopkins in the title role shortly after a recent screening at the Edwards South Coast Plaza theater in Costa Mesa. "And he acted weird too. Was he really a president?" Sharon Smith patiently pointed out that Hopkins' clenched performance tried to show the human side of Nixon, a flawed man who for a few long years was the most powerful figure in the world.
OPINION
January 6, 2013 | By Bill Whalen
A century ago on Jan. 9, Richard Nixon was born in a Southern California agricultural subdivision dubbed Yorba Linda, in a 900-square-foot mail-order house assembled by his father. The centennial of America's 37th president won't be met with much fanfare beyond this weekend's wreath-laying at that home and a Nixon Foundation dinner Wednesday in Washington. Although the Nixon Library has other centennial-related events planned for 2013, there's little of the hoopla that accompanied the 100th birthday of California's other president, Ronald Reagan, two years ago. Like another former Republican president, Nixon is a victim of unfortunate political timing.
NEWS
September 11, 2008
Senators: A Sunday Opinion caption on Sept. 7 said that only six sitting or former U.S. senators have been nominated to run for president since Lyndon Johnson, and that none was elected. Richard Nixon, the 37th president, served as a U.S. senator from California from 1950-52.
BUSINESS
September 28, 1989
How wonderfully heartwarming is the news account (Part I, Sept. 20) of the unanimous vote by the Yorba Linda City Council declaring President Nixon's birthday a city holiday. It is not surprising that this resolution has met with such tremendous enthusiasm, for the greatness of achievements and statesmanship of our 37th President becomes more evident with each passing day. SUSAN SPREEN Mission Viejo
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1994
At the end of his compelling and dispassionate three-volume biography of Richard Nixon, the historian Stephen E. Ambrose sums up his subject's nature, those traits that over a long career brought the 37th President stunning political triumphs but ultimately disgrace and ruin. Nixon, he writes, was the toughest American politician of his time. Disciplined, highly knowledgeable, a hard worker, an inveterate risk taker. A man of enormous pride who was never ready to accept defeat.
OPINION
January 6, 2013 | By Bill Whalen
A century ago on Jan. 9, Richard Nixon was born in a Southern California agricultural subdivision dubbed Yorba Linda, in a 900-square-foot mail-order house assembled by his father. The centennial of America's 37th president won't be met with much fanfare beyond this weekend's wreath-laying at that home and a Nixon Foundation dinner Wednesday in Washington. Although the Nixon Library has other centennial-related events planned for 2013, there's little of the hoopla that accompanied the 100th birthday of California's other president, Ronald Reagan, two years ago. Like another former Republican president, Nixon is a victim of unfortunate political timing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2013 | By Jean Merl, Los Angeles Times
Paul J. Carter was 9 when Richard M. Nixon resigned the presidency in 1974, watching the televised speech with his dad, a loyal Republican who had come home from work early for the event. "I … didn't grasp the magnitude of it," said Carter, now 47 and a lawyer in Long Beach. Nearly four decades later, the boy's puzzlement over the nation's 37th president had evolved into a grown-up project, "Native Son Richard Nixon's Southern California: My Life on a Map!" Made like a guide to Hollywood stars' homes, the fold-out map is an illustrated romp through the life of the only White House occupant born and raised in Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2012 | Paloma Esquivel
Hers are concise notes, funny and practical; his are lengthy, flowery and eager. "Somehow on Tuesday there was something electric in the usually almost stifling air in Whittier," Richard Nixon wrote to Patricia Ryan in an undated letter written during their courtship. "And now I know. An Irish gypsy who radiates all that is happy and beautiful was there. " The letter and others exchanged between Nixon and the woman who would become his wife of 53 years will be on display at the Nixon Presidential Library and Museum in Yorba Linda during the next several months.
OPINION
August 9, 2011 | Rick Perlstein
Last month, a federal court ruled that the testimony Richard Nixon made to the Watergate grand jury in the summer of 1975 should be unsealed and released to the public. The decision has the potential to settle finally the question of whether the nation's 37th president was a criminal. The grand jury testimony, which Nixon gave in San Clemente, was the only time in history he was required by law to be honest about Watergate. And now we will know what he said. While Nixon was president he refused to testify at the trials of Watergate conspirators or before the Senate Select Committee investigating Watergate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2011 | By Christopher Goffard, Los Angeles Times
After decades of being derided as little more than a legacy-and-curio shop designed to burnish Richard Nixon's image at the expense of the historical record, the Yorba Linda library bearing his name has unveiled a raw and detailed look at the scandal that drove him from office. The $500,000 Watergate exhibit, four years in the making, features interactive screens, White House tapes and 131 taped interviews that replace the perfunctory, much-ridiculed narrative of Watergate that Nixon himself approved when the library opened with private funds in 1990.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2008 | Susan King, King is a Times staff writer.
Richard M. Nixon once said, "You won't have Nixon to kick around anymore . . . " It wasn't true, of course. That was in 1962 when he'd just lost a gubernatorial election. He came back to be elected president twice. And especially since his resignation on Aug.
NEWS
January 27, 1986 | United Press International
Richard M. Nixon was admitted to a Miami area hospital today suffering from a viral infection and dehydration, and an aide said the 73-year-old former President was suffering from the flu. Eileen Marcus, a spokeswoman for the Miami Heart Institute, said Nixon "was admitted at 1:04 p.m., suffering from a viral infection and dehydration." She said Nixon's Miami area physician, Dr. Lewis Elias, had not reported immediately on the former President's condition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1988
Far from feeling betrayed, Greenberg should feel vindicated for his past support of President Nixon. Strange that he seems so excessively offended by the warm and enthusiastic reception given to Nixon by journalists, who previously vilified him, and the American public who seemingly deserted him. This change in attitude by critics is due, in my opinion, to the realization and subsequent appreciation of the monumental accomplishments attained...
NEWS
September 11, 2008
Senators: A Sunday Opinion caption on Sept. 7 said that only six sitting or former U.S. senators have been nominated to run for president since Lyndon Johnson, and that none was elected. Richard Nixon, the 37th president, served as a U.S. senator from California from 1950-52.
NEWS
October 10, 2004 | From Associated Press
Richard Nixon is immortalized in wax, his image molded into a candle in that oh-so-'70s shade of avocado green. Abraham Lincoln is depicted in brass, on a fittingly weighty paper clip in keeping with the solemnity of his times. George W. Bush, often underestimated, pops up from a jack-in-the-box.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|