Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollections39th And Dalton Incident
IN THE NEWS

39th And Dalton Incident

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1991 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A defense attorney, responding to conspiracy charges against a Los Angeles Police Department supervisor, argued Thursday that Capt. Thomas Elfmont became a target in the case only after he recommended that other officers be disciplined for the ill-fated drug raid at 39th Street and Dalton Avenue. Elfmont fully cooperated with the LAPD's Internal Affairs investigators and the district attorney's office in the months after the Aug. 1, 1988, raid, attorney Barry Levin told jurors.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1992 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal court judge on Wednesday approved a $600,000 settlement in the last of a costly series of lawsuits growing out of a 1988 drug raid in which Los Angeles police officers trashed units in two South-Central Los Angeles apartment buildings. Cheri and Henry Lang, owners of an apartment building at 39th Street and Dalton Avenue, will receive the $600,000 if the agreement is approved by the Los Angeles City Council.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1992 | LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles police officer repeatedly cited for misconduct--from the 39th-and-Dalton case to the Christopher Commission hearings--was fired Monday for kicking, punching and butting a suspect and submitting a misleading report on the incident, department officials said. The action was taken against Todd B. Parrick, 29, a defendant in the 39th and Dalton trial.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1992 | LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles police officer repeatedly cited for misconduct--from the 39th-and-Dalton case to the Christopher Commission hearings--was fired Monday for kicking, punching and butting a suspect and submitting a misleading report on the incident, department officials said. The action was taken against Todd B. Parrick, 29, a defendant in the 39th and Dalton trial.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1991
A federal judge has ordered Los Angeles officials to pay more than $30,000 in fees and costs to a civil rights attorney because Police Chief Daryl F. Gates and his lawyer failed to release confidential reports on the notorious Dalton Avenue raid. In an order issued Tuesday, U.S. District Judge Robert M. Takasugi awarded $30,485 to attorney Stephen Yagman, who represents two owners of the apartment buildings at 39th Street and Dalton Avenue that were ransacked in a 1988 drug raid by police.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1992 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal court judge on Wednesday approved a $600,000 settlement in the last of a costly series of lawsuits growing out of a 1988 drug raid in which Los Angeles police officers trashed units in two South-Central Los Angeles apartment buildings. Cheri and Henry Lang, owners of an apartment building at 39th Street and Dalton Avenue, will receive the $600,000 if the agreement is approved by the Los Angeles City Council.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1991 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the strenuous objections of Police Chief Daryl F. Gates, the Los Angeles Police Commission on Tuesday said it will consider expanding department policy to include the active recruitment of gays and lesbians. The move, albeit tentative, marks yet another step in what gay community activists have termed a "historic event"--the opening up of the Police Department to gay and lesbian officers.
NEWS
June 20, 1991 | TERRY PRISTIN and DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Three Los Angeles police officers were cleared Wednesday of criminal wrongdoing in the notorious ransacking of four apartments at 39th Street and Dalton Avenue in a 1988 drug raid. After nearly three weeks of deliberation, a Municipal Court jury returned verdicts of not guilty on five of six counts lodged against the three officers. It deadlocked 9 to 3 in favor of acquittal on the sixth count, which was subsequently dismissed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1991 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The highest-ranking police officer present during the notorious Dalton Street drug raid faces possible suspension from the force after an LAPD board found him guilty of misconduct--even though he was acquitted of criminal charges in the case earlier this year, police officials said Friday. The Police Department's Board of Rights, a three-member administrative panel, recommended that Sgt. Charles E.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1990 | ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles police officer who faces criminal charges in the so-called "39th and Dalton" incident testified Thursday that his commanding officer assured him that no punitive action would be taken against him before he led the commander to a key piece of evidence in the case that had been hidden in an underground storm drain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1991 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The highest-ranking police officer present during the notorious Dalton Street drug raid faces possible suspension from the force after an LAPD board found him guilty of misconduct--even though he was acquitted of criminal charges in the case earlier this year, police officials said Friday. The Police Department's Board of Rights, a three-member administrative panel, recommended that Sgt. Charles E.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1991 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the strenuous objections of Police Chief Daryl F. Gates, the Los Angeles Police Commission on Tuesday said it will consider expanding department policy to include the active recruitment of gays and lesbians. The move, albeit tentative, marks yet another step in what gay community activists have termed a "historic event"--the opening up of the Police Department to gay and lesbian officers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1991
A federal judge has ordered Los Angeles officials to pay more than $30,000 in fees and costs to a civil rights attorney because Police Chief Daryl F. Gates and his lawyer failed to release confidential reports on the notorious Dalton Avenue raid. In an order issued Tuesday, U.S. District Judge Robert M. Takasugi awarded $30,485 to attorney Stephen Yagman, who represents two owners of the apartment buildings at 39th Street and Dalton Avenue that were ransacked in a 1988 drug raid by police.
NEWS
June 20, 1991 | TERRY PRISTIN and DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Three Los Angeles police officers were cleared Wednesday of criminal wrongdoing in the notorious ransacking of four apartments at 39th Street and Dalton Avenue in a 1988 drug raid. After nearly three weeks of deliberation, a Municipal Court jury returned verdicts of not guilty on five of six counts lodged against the three officers. It deadlocked 9 to 3 in favor of acquittal on the sixth count, which was subsequently dismissed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1991 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A defense attorney, responding to conspiracy charges against a Los Angeles Police Department supervisor, argued Thursday that Capt. Thomas Elfmont became a target in the case only after he recommended that other officers be disciplined for the ill-fated drug raid at 39th Street and Dalton Avenue. Elfmont fully cooperated with the LAPD's Internal Affairs investigators and the district attorney's office in the months after the Aug. 1, 1988, raid, attorney Barry Levin told jurors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1990 | ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a development that could result in the suppression of a key piece of evidence in a criminal case against Los Angeles police officers in the so-called "39th and Dalton Incident," a former police supervisor testified Tuesday that he improperly agreed to distort a report to reward an officer for disclosing where the evidence was hidden.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1990 | ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two police internal affairs investigators denied under oath Wednesday that they did anything to coerce an officer who faces criminal charges stemming from the so-called "39th and Dalton Incident" into disclosing where he had hidden a battering ram that is a key piece of evidence in the case. The testimony of Capt. Carlo S.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|