Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollections40
IN THE NEWS

40

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
November 27, 2006 | J.A. Adande
We're at the point where any San Diego Chargers victory can be summarized in two words. This goes back to Nov. 19, when between updates I saw a 24-7 San Diego deficit against Denver turn into a 35-27 Chargers victory and I text-messaged a friend to ask what happened. My buddy's reply: "LT happened." Flash-forward to Sunday, when the Chargers had to deal with a strong Oakland Raiders defensive effort, a shaky performance by quarterback Philip Rivers and a 14-7 Raiders lead in the fourth quarter.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2014 | By Sandy Banks
My column Tuesday on the courtroom tears of a gang member sentenced to 40 years in prison for a campus shooting resonated with readers - but not in the way I imagined it would. I considered the courtroom scene a cautionary message to other young men who glorify gangs and are enamored of guns: You could spend the rest of your life in prison over a stupid vendetta and a single violent act. But readers focused not just on the threat posed by hotheads with guns, but on the perceived injustice of such a long sentence for a young man who didn't kill anyone.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 9, 1998 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An identical twin whose plot to kill her sister made headlines around the world sobbed uncontrollably Friday as a judge sentenced her to 26 years to life in prison. Despite her emotional, last-minute protest of innocence, Jeen "Gina" Han, 24, dubbed "the evil twin," received the maximum sentence. "It is obvious Miss Han is a danger to society, particularly her own family," said Orange County Superior Court Judge Eileen C. Moore. "All of her family have been victims of her crimes."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - State authorities Thursday imposed $40,000 in fines against Sen. Tom Berryhill (R-Modesto) and two GOP committees after finding that the lawmaker laundered that amount of political money into his brother's 2008 Assembly campaign. The state Fair Political Practices Commission voted unanimously to uphold an administrative law judge's ruling that Berryhill committed a "serious and deliberate" violation of California's campaign finance laws. The commissioners decided in a 20-minute closed session to include in the fines the Stanislaus County and San Joaquin County Republican central committees for their role as conduits in passing $40,000 from Berryhill to his brother's successful campaign.
SCIENCE
July 9, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Medical castration to treat localized prostate tumors does not prolong survival and its side effects far outweigh any potential benefit for most patients, researchers reported today. The technique, which involves using drugs to block the body's production of the male hormone androgen, is a powerful tool when used in conjunction with surgery or radiation for treating aggressive prostate tumors.
NEWS
December 22, 1988 | BETTY CUNIBERTI, Times Staff Writer
In his short life, former ABC television anchorman Max Robinson admitted having many problems: alcohol abuse, racial struggles, career disaster and three failed marriages. But he never publicly acknowledged having the disease that would end his life. Yet in his death at 49, Robinson had his family reveal that he had AIDS so that others in the black community would be alerted to the dangers of the disease and the need for treatment and education.
NEWS
December 3, 1990 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Cummings, the perennially youthful bachelor photographer of the 1950s television series "The Bob Cummings Show," died Sunday at the Motion Picture and Television Hospital in Woodland Hills. Cummings, 80, died of kidney failure and complications of pneumonia, hospital spokeswoman Louella Benson said. The actor, who also was in advanced stages of Parkinson's Disease, was admitted to the hospital Nov. 18.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1988 | JOHN JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
It's Friday night at the drive-in. As the pale-skinned hero of the season's hot new martial-arts flick snaps the bones of the Asian archvillain, the Winnetka 6 erupts in honking horns and flashing headlights. The movie that has the big-wheeled pickups beeping is "Bloodsport." Advertised as the true story of an American who defeated all comers 13 years ago in a no-holds-barred international tournament of warriors, the movie opened last month at 800 U.S.
AUTOS
July 12, 2006 | Jeanne Wright, Special to The Times
A new bill of rights for California car buyers provides grace periods for used-car purchases, caps dealer compensation on loans and features other provisions that are some of the strongest consumer protections in the country, according to state legislators and consumer advocates. The law, which went into effect July 1, applies to motor vehicles bought in California from a dealer for personal, family or household use.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1988 | Staff Writer Jerry Hicks
Prosecutors in the Randy Steven Kraft murder trial say a paper with 61 entries, found in his car trunk when he was arrested May 14, 1983, is a death list--Kraft's own score card of how many young men he had killed dating back to late 1971. Kraft's attorneys deny it is a death list, and call it meaningless information that will only inflame his jury. Kraft himself, in a 1983 interview, called the list nothing more than references to friends of his and his roommate at the time.
OPINION
April 23, 2014
Re "Campus shooter receives 40-year term," April 19 While Brandon Spencer's shooting into a crowd and wounding of four people were inexcusable and foolish acts, I believe his actions were evidence of an immature adolescent brain not functioning well. Most important, I think his sentence of 40 years to life in prison is excessive. I would rather see the money that will be spent on incarcerating him over the next few decades go instead toward putting him through school so he and all taxpayers benefit.
NEWS
April 22, 2014 | By Paul Thornton
Brandon Spencer, the 21-year-old former gang member sentenced to 40 years to life in prison for attempted murder, may have sobbed like a toddler Friday after learning that the next several decades of his life will be spent behind bars, but he deserves little sympathy, wrote Times columnist Sandy Banks on Monday. But several of our readers had a much more charitable, even forgiving, attitude toward Spencer. The two sides don't dispute the facts: A gun-toting Spencer showed up at a Halloween party at USC in 2012 looking to exact revenge on a gang rival; several shots later, three innocent bystanders in addition to Spencer's target were injured.
SPORTS
April 21, 2014 | By John Cherwa
It wasn't exciting. It wasn't close. But it was very entertaining if you were a Clippers fan. In a total reversal of Game 1, the Clippers dominated the Golden State Warriors from the opening tip Monday night at Staples Center to take a 138-98 victory and tie the best-of-seven NBA playoff series at 1-1. Games 3 and 4 will be in Oakland on Thursday and Sunday. The game at Staples Center was over by the second quarter when the Clippers pushed their 31-20 lead after the first quarter to more than 20 points.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2014 | Sandy Banks
Brandon Spencer ought to be considered an object lesson by wannabe gangsters carrying guns. The 21-year-old was sentenced Friday to 40 years to life in prison for shooting into a crowd waiting in line for a Halloween party on the USC campus in 2012. He wounded four people - including his target - but seems to think he ought to get leniency because nobody died. Spencer threw a tantrum in the courtroom when the judge announced his sentence, crying and banging his head on a table, like a 2-year-old sentenced to time-out.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2014 | By Ryan Menezes
A man convicted of attempted murder for opening fire on a rival gang member on the USC campus sobbed in court Friday as he was sentenced to 40 years to life in prison. At one point, sheriff's deputies had to calm Brandon Spencer as he banged his head on the defense table. He was convicted in February on four counts of attempted murder for the 2012 shooting, the first on the campus in decades. Four people were shot and injured. Nearly 50 friends and family members sat behind Spencer as he tried to compose himself and ask the judge for a second chance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2014 | By Ryan Menezes
A man convicted of attempted murder for opening fire on a rival gang member on the USC campus, injuring four, sobbed uncontrollably in court Friday after he was sentenced to 40 years to life in prison. At one point, sheriff's deputies had to restrain Brandon Spencer as he banged his head on the defense table. He was convicted in February of four counts of attempted murder for the 2012 shooting, the first at the campus in decades. While prosecutors argued that Spencer should serve his four terms consecutively, Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Edmund W. Clarke Jr. ordered Spencer to serve his sentences concurrently, which means he will eventually be eligible for parole.
NEWS
February 14, 1993 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was just another tragedy in family court. A young crack mother, desperate to conceal her pregnancy, had locked herself in a tenement bathroom and given birth to a three-pound boy. As she pushed, he fell to the floor and broke his skull. The mother abandoned him, like she had two previous babies. All were born addicted to crack. "Can we do anything about this woman?" asks Judge Judith Sheindlin, her voice taut with anger.
NEWS
March 14, 1988 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, Times Staff Writer
In the late 1950s, Jimmy Swaggart was roaming around the back roads of Louisiana in a broken-down Chevrolet, earning about $40 a week from his preaching and gospel singing. He has come a long way since then. The controversial evangelist now heads a tax-exempt enterprise that ranks, by almost any measure, as one of the most successful of its kind. Jimmy Swaggart World Ministries and its Bible college boasted revenues of $150 million in 1987--more than $500,000 each working day.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2014 | By Steven Zeitchik
NEW YORK - This Tony season, an unprecedented number of movie and Hollywood stars under 40 are hitting Broadway for the first time. "Scrubs'" Zach Braff just made his debut in Susan Stroman's staging of Woody Allen's comedy-musical "Bullets Over Broadway. " Golden Globe winner and Oscar nominee Michelle Williams is trying out her singing talents - and a British accent - as Sally Bowles in the Roundabout's sort-of revival of "Cabaret. " But nothing epitomizes this influx more than the trio of Broadway rookies bringing a burst of star power - and their fan followings on social media - to Tony-winner Anna D. Shapiro's staging of the John Steinbeck classic "Of Mice and Men" about Depression-era migrant workers in California.  PHOTOS: Hollywood stars on stage The show, which hasn't been seen on Broadway in four decades, opens Wednesday at the Longacre Theatre with James Franco (1.9 million Twitter followers)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2014 | By Joe Flint and Meg James
Comcast Corp., already the nation's largest cable and Internet provider, says it needs to get bigger to compete against the formidable giants of Silicon Valley. The Philadelphia-based cable behemoth said in a government filing Tuesday that its proposed $40-billion acquisition of Time Warner Cable Inc. will benefit consumers without limiting competition. Both companies contend that they need muscle to compete against emerging competition from Google Inc., Apple Inc., Netflix Inc. and Amazon.com Inc. Comcast said in a 175-page document filed with the Federal Communications Commission that the deal would mean better Internet and cable TV service for millions of consumers.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|