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401 K Funds

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BUSINESS
September 1, 1998 | PAUL J. LIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Days like Monday make some investors want to race to the phone to sell their stock mutual funds. Or at the very least, shift some of their stock holdings into safer, more stable investment options such as money market mutual funds. Indeed, individual investors have been doing just that during August, mutual fund companies report. But before you take this step, understand how such a move will affect your portfolio in the long term.
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BUSINESS
November 11, 2001 | JOSH FRIEDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some companies are cutting back on one of American workers' prized benefits: matching contributions to their 401(k) retirement savings plans. DaimlerChrysler's U.S. unit, the Wyndham International Inc. hotel chain and Bethlehem Steel Corp. are among a smattering of financially stressed companies across a range of industries that have suspended their matches to conserve cash in recent months as the U.S. economic downturn has deepened.
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BUSINESS
October 18, 1992 | KATHY M. KRISTOF
Last month, John Smith's employer got out of the pension planning business. That put Smith, whose name has been changed for this article, in a sticky spot. Smith, who has worked for the firm more than 20 years, assumed that he would get a set monthly stipend when he retired. Now the amount and the duration of that payment will depend on how well he invests the $80,000 his employer distributed to him when the company dissolved its pension plan.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2000 | LIZ PULLIAM WESTON
Q: When I signed up for a 401(k), my employer said I must designate a beneficiary, so I just put down my wife's name, even though we had never actually lived together and I wasn't sure then whether we ever would. Now I no longer work at the company and have requested a withdrawal of my funds. My request was rejected because it required spousal consent and her signature. The trouble is I don't even know her whereabouts. My landlady can attest that my wife has never lived with me.
BUSINESS
September 28, 1996 | From Reuters
Nearly 17,000 people had $4.8 million credited to their 401(k) retirement plans after employers made use of a grace period to replace funds they had failed to deposit properly, the government said Friday. The Labor Department released data showing that 170 small to mid-size businesses voluntarily returned employee contributions and made good on lost earnings after they were given six months to do so without penalty.
BUSINESS
October 6, 1998 | PAUL J. LIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you haven't received your quarterly 401(k) plan statement yet, you will. Soon. And you probably won't like what you see. For the first time, possibly since you began investing in your company-sponsored retirement plan, you'll notice that most of your stock funds have lost money--both over the last three months and on a year-to-date basis. And those nice, fat 20%-plus annual return figures many of you have grown accustomed to over longer periods have most likely disappeared.
BUSINESS
July 15, 1989 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI
QUESTION: I plan to buy a home in five years. In the meantime, should I avoid putting any money into an individual retirement account or 401(k) plan? I know many friends who have had to pay hefty early withdrawal penalties when they have used proceeds from these accounts for the down payments on their homes.--J. S. ANSWER: Your best course of action depends greatly on your individual circumstances, the details of which you neglected to include.
BUSINESS
February 20, 1994 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI
Q. I recently got a new job. My previous employer offered a 401(k) plan; my new employer does not. What should I do with the money from my old 401(k) plan when the funds are disbursed? Is there anything I can do to defer paying taxes on the money? --A.W . A. To avoid immediate taxation, you should transfer the proceeds in your old employer's 401(k) plan to a tax-deferred individual retirement account. Those proceeds and the accumulated interest will be taxable when you withdraw them.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2000 | LIZ PULLIAM WESTON
Q: When I signed up for a 401(k), my employer said I must designate a beneficiary, so I just put down my wife's name, even though we had never actually lived together and I wasn't sure then whether we ever would. Now I no longer work at the company and have requested a withdrawal of my funds. My request was rejected because it required spousal consent and her signature. The trouble is I don't even know her whereabouts. My landlady can attest that my wife has never lived with me.
BUSINESS
November 11, 2001 | JOSH FRIEDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some companies are cutting back on one of American workers' prized benefits: matching contributions to their 401(k) retirement savings plans. DaimlerChrysler's U.S. unit, the Wyndham International Inc. hotel chain and Bethlehem Steel Corp. are among a smattering of financially stressed companies across a range of industries that have suspended their matches to conserve cash in recent months as the U.S. economic downturn has deepened.
BUSINESS
October 6, 1998 | PAUL J. LIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you haven't received your quarterly 401(k) plan statement yet, you will. Soon. And you probably won't like what you see. For the first time, possibly since you began investing in your company-sponsored retirement plan, you'll notice that most of your stock funds have lost money--both over the last three months and on a year-to-date basis. And those nice, fat 20%-plus annual return figures many of you have grown accustomed to over longer periods have most likely disappeared.
BUSINESS
September 1, 1998 | PAUL J. LIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Days like Monday make some investors want to race to the phone to sell their stock mutual funds. Or at the very least, shift some of their stock holdings into safer, more stable investment options such as money market mutual funds. Indeed, individual investors have been doing just that during August, mutual fund companies report. But before you take this step, understand how such a move will affect your portfolio in the long term.
BUSINESS
September 28, 1996 | From Reuters
Nearly 17,000 people had $4.8 million credited to their 401(k) retirement plans after employers made use of a grace period to replace funds they had failed to deposit properly, the government said Friday. The Labor Department released data showing that 170 small to mid-size businesses voluntarily returned employee contributions and made good on lost earnings after they were given six months to do so without penalty.
BUSINESS
February 20, 1994 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI
Q. I recently got a new job. My previous employer offered a 401(k) plan; my new employer does not. What should I do with the money from my old 401(k) plan when the funds are disbursed? Is there anything I can do to defer paying taxes on the money? --A.W . A. To avoid immediate taxation, you should transfer the proceeds in your old employer's 401(k) plan to a tax-deferred individual retirement account. Those proceeds and the accumulated interest will be taxable when you withdraw them.
BUSINESS
October 18, 1992 | KATHY M. KRISTOF
Last month, John Smith's employer got out of the pension planning business. That put Smith, whose name has been changed for this article, in a sticky spot. Smith, who has worked for the firm more than 20 years, assumed that he would get a set monthly stipend when he retired. Now the amount and the duration of that payment will depend on how well he invests the $80,000 his employer distributed to him when the company dissolved its pension plan.
BUSINESS
July 15, 1989 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI
QUESTION: I plan to buy a home in five years. In the meantime, should I avoid putting any money into an individual retirement account or 401(k) plan? I know many friends who have had to pay hefty early withdrawal penalties when they have used proceeds from these accounts for the down payments on their homes.--J. S. ANSWER: Your best course of action depends greatly on your individual circumstances, the details of which you neglected to include.
BUSINESS
July 21, 1996
Pension funds may have more money than 401(k) plans, but this situation won't last long. Gross annual inflows into 401(k)s topped $65 billion in 1995, according to Access Research, a consultant for the industry. By 2000, the firm says, more money in retirement plans will be in 401(k) funds--an estimated $1.5 trillion--than in the old-style paternalistic defined benefit plans.
BUSINESS
July 23, 2002 | Bloomberg News
SBC Communications Inc. agreed to pay $10 million to settle a suit brought by employees who said the company lost $635 million in their retirement funds by selling shares in a wireless carrier before it was acquired by Vodafone Group. The suit, filed in April 2000, claimed that the local phone company should have known a bidding war would start over AirTouch Communications Inc. after the company sold its employees' 401(k) shares in AirTouch in 1998, when shares were $52.25.
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