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48 Hours Television Program

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 2004 | Michael Krikorian, Times Staff Writer
A $30-million lawsuit has been filed against CBS Broadcasting Inc. and several individuals for allegedly illegally obtaining and televising a video showing a drugged woman being sexually assaulted by convicted rapist Andrew Luster. The lawsuit, filed Tuesday, alleges the CBS program "48 Hours" violated a court order and in February 2003 aired the video that showed the plaintiff known as "Lynn Doe" and Luster, 39, the great-grandson of cosmetics magnate Max Factor.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 2004 | Michael Krikorian, Times Staff Writer
A $30-million lawsuit has been filed against CBS Broadcasting Inc. and several individuals for allegedly illegally obtaining and televising a video showing a drugged woman being sexually assaulted by convicted rapist Andrew Luster. The lawsuit, filed Tuesday, alleges the CBS program "48 Hours" violated a court order and in February 2003 aired the video that showed the plaintiff known as "Lynn Doe" and Luster, 39, the great-grandson of cosmetics magnate Max Factor.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1992 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rob Hershman's colleagues at "48 Hours" began to suspect something was amiss with the veteran CBS News producer last September. "A couple of people mentioned it to me: 'Hershman's not pulling his weight,' " says Andrew Heyward, executive producer of "48 Hours." "I made a mental note to check with him." But before his boss even had a chance to ask, Hershman, 39, raised the issue himself. "He asked for a meeting. He told me he had AIDS and that he was physically deteriorating," Heyward says.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2003 | Mark Sachs, Times Staff Writer
A woman celebrating her 27th birthday plummets from the balcony of a hotel room to her death more than 100 feet below. Was it a tragic accident that ended a night of heavy drinking and clumsy romance with her married boss, or was it a flat-out case of murder? A Southland jury reached its decision in November, but you have an opportunity to assess the evidence for yourself tonight at 10 as CBS' "48 Hours Investigates" rehashes the details of the well-publicized 1996 death of Sandra Orellana.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2003 | Mark Sachs, Times Staff Writer
A woman celebrating her 27th birthday plummets from the balcony of a hotel room to her death more than 100 feet below. Was it a tragic accident that ended a night of heavy drinking and clumsy romance with her married boss, or was it a flat-out case of murder? A Southland jury reached its decision in November, but you have an opportunity to assess the evidence for yourself tonight at 10 as CBS' "48 Hours Investigates" rehashes the details of the well-publicized 1996 death of Sandra Orellana.
NEWS
February 10, 1994 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Supreme Court Justice Harry A. Blackmun on Wednesday lifted a state court order forbidding broadcast of an unauthorized videotape, allowing CBS News to go ahead with its hidden-camera news report showing tainted meat at a South Dakota packing plant. Acting hours before the program "48 Hours" was scheduled to go on the air, Blackmun stressed that the First Amendment bars judges from blocking the media from reporting the news.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1993 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anchorman Dan Rather's one-hour television special with President Bill Clinton had political Washington buzzing Thursday, but more for its cuddly quality than for the news it made. Rather in recent years has won a special place in the national press corps for his presidential encounters. His televised interview with George Bush in 1988 was so rough that it devolved into a blood feud that lasted all of Bush's presidency, and triggered a debate about press fairness and objectivity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1992 | LYNN SMITH and ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
America will pull up its chair next week, turn on the TV and glimpse how it's coping with AIDS--by viewing Orange County as an example. A CBS News team, anchored by Dan Rather, spent two weeks talking to local residents with acquired immune deficiency syndrome and to educators for its prime-time TV show, "48 Hours: The Killer Next Door." It illustrates how AIDS has spread beyond the gay population and inner cities and into white, suburban America.
NEWS
February 10, 1994 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Supreme Court Justice Harry A. Blackmun on Wednesday lifted a state court order forbidding broadcast of an unauthorized videotape, allowing CBS News to go ahead with its hidden-camera news report showing tainted meat at a South Dakota packing plant. Acting hours before the program "48 Hours" was scheduled to go on the air, Blackmun stressed that the First Amendment bars judges from blocking the media from reporting the news.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1993 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anchorman Dan Rather's one-hour television special with President Bill Clinton had political Washington buzzing Thursday, but more for its cuddly quality than for the news it made. Rather in recent years has won a special place in the national press corps for his presidential encounters. His televised interview with George Bush in 1988 was so rough that it devolved into a blood feud that lasted all of Bush's presidency, and triggered a debate about press fairness and objectivity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1992 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The day after the airing of "48 Hours: the Killer Next Door," a CBS program documenting the AIDS epidemic in Orange County, people involved in the production were basking in the generally positive and sympathetic reaction it received.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1992 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rob Hershman's colleagues at "48 Hours" began to suspect something was amiss with the veteran CBS News producer last September. "A couple of people mentioned it to me: 'Hershman's not pulling his weight,' " says Andrew Heyward, executive producer of "48 Hours." "I made a mental note to check with him." But before his boss even had a chance to ask, Hershman, 39, raised the issue himself. "He asked for a meeting. He told me he had AIDS and that he was physically deteriorating," Heyward says.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1992 | LYNN SMITH and ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
America will pull up its chair next week, turn on the TV and glimpse how it's coping with AIDS--by viewing Orange County as an example. A CBS News team, anchored by Dan Rather, spent two weeks talking to local residents with acquired immune deficiency syndrome and to educators for its prime-time TV show, "48 Hours: The Killer Next Door." It illustrates how AIDS has spread beyond the gay population and inner cities and into white, suburban America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1992 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The day after the airing of "48 Hours: the Killer Next Door," a CBS program documenting the AIDS epidemic in Orange County, people involved in the production were basking in the generally positive and sympathetic reaction it received.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1989 | JANE HALL
On a hot summer afternoon, narcotics detectives strap on guns and bulletproof vests to raid a suspected crack house. Behind them as they burst through the door is Dan Rather, a long way from the anchor desk, in a bulletproof vest and followed by a cameraman from the CBS News series "48 Hours." Inside, the detectives find a suspect, a cache of crack--and seven more people hiding in the basement. The police have hit pay dirt--and so has "48 Hours."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1989 | JANE HALL
On a hot summer afternoon, narcotics detectives strap on guns and bulletproof vests to raid a suspected crack house. Behind them as they burst through the door is Dan Rather, a long way from the anchor desk, in a bulletproof vest and followed by a cameraman from the CBS News series "48 Hours." Inside, the detectives find a suspect, a cache of crack--and seven more people hiding in the basement. The police have hit pay dirt--and so has "48 Hours."
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