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BUSINESS
December 30, 2013 | By Andrea Chang
Hey, big spender, here's something to add to next year's Christmas list: Samsung's new 110-inch 4K television, which the electronics giant has just priced at a whopping $152,000. The ultra-high-definition television, which has four times the resolution of standard high-def TVs, is available in South Korea, China and the Middle East, according to the Associated Press. As larger TVs become more popular, television manufacturers have been racing to create sets that are not only bigger but sharper as well.
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BUSINESS
December 30, 2013 | By Andrea Chang
Hey, big spender, here's something to add to next year's Christmas list: Samsung's new 110-inch 4K television, which the electronics giant has just priced at a whopping $152,000. The ultra-high-definition television, which has four times the resolution of standard high-def TVs, is available in South Korea, China and the Middle East, according to the Associated Press. As larger TVs become more popular, television manufacturers have been racing to create sets that are not only bigger but sharper as well.
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BUSINESS
August 29, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Sony Corp. unveiled its first ultra-high-definition television, along with a new tablet and three new smartphones, at a consumer electronics trade show Wednesday in Berlin. Later this year, Sony said, it will start selling the television, called a 4K TV because it has nearly four times the resolution of typical 1,080-pixel HD sets. The 4K technology is regarded as being the next step in TV technology. Sony said its version will have an 84-inch LCD screen with a resolution of 3,840 pixels by 2,160.
BUSINESS
August 29, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Sony Corp. unveiled its first ultra-high-definition television, along with a new tablet and three new smartphones, at a consumer electronics trade show Wednesday in Berlin. Later this year, Sony said, it will start selling the television, called a 4K TV because it has nearly four times the resolution of typical 1,080-pixel HD sets. The 4K technology is regarded as being the next step in TV technology. Sony said its version will have an 84-inch LCD screen with a resolution of 3,840 pixels by 2,160.
BUSINESS
January 9, 2014 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
LAS VEGAS - Local resident Tony Holdip stood admiring the latest technological lust object on display at the world's largest consumer electronics show as a friend joined a crowd of amateur photographers snapping pictures of the immense 110-inch Samsung TV. "This is unbelievable," Holdip said, and commented on the set's brightness and image clarity. "The only problem I can see with this is it's possibly too big. " The Samsung Electronics Co. television set represents the next generation in home entertainment, "ultra-high-definition," or "4K," TV sets that boast four times the resolution of HDTV displays found in American households.
BUSINESS
January 10, 2013 | By Jon Healey
Seemingly every television manufacturer at the Consumer Electronics Show this week is showing off an UltraHD (also known as 4K TV) set, offering stunningly good pictures on very large screens. Only one, though, seems to be touting an even higher-resolution technology. That would be Sharp, which is showing an updated version of the 8K TV prototype it unveiled last year. This year's demo was even more impressive than last year's. Not only did the screen offer an amazing level of detail and brightness (it's powered by LEDs)
BUSINESS
March 28, 2012 | By Andrea Chang
U.S. flat-panel television shipments are expected to dip for the first time on an annual basis this year, ending an unbroken string of growth since the segment first began. According to a report from market research firm IHS iSuppli, shipments of flat-panel TVs are forecast to decline to 37.1 million units, down 5% from 39.1 million units in 2011. Last year, shipments inched up just 1% from 38.6 million units in 2010. The flat-panel TV category includes liquid crystal display televisions, plasma TVs and rear-projection TVs. Shipments are projected to continue to weaken for the next three years until at least 2015 due in large part to the maturation of the U.S. television market.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2012 | By Andrea Chang
Worldwide TV shipments fell last year for the first time since at least 2004, slipping 0.3% to 247.7 million units. Market research firm NPD DisplaySearch said Wednesday that LCD TV shipments rose by 7% to slightly more than 205 million units, a “substantial slowdown” from the double-digit growth in previous years. The firm began tracking global TV shipments in 2004. Plasma TV shipments declined almost 7% to 17.2 million units, the largest decrease yet, and cathode ray tube, or CRT, TVs fell 34%, the firm said.
BUSINESS
June 20, 2012 | By Andrea Chang
Worldwide television shipments fell nearly 8% year over year in the first quarter, marking the steepest rate of decline since the second quarter of 2009. TV shipments totaled 51 million units for the quarter, according to a report from NPD DisplaySearch. The firm said the biggest contributor to the decline was a slowdown in shipments of LCD TVs, which fell year over year for the first time in the history of the category. “Soft demand and cautious expectations about the upcoming year in many parts of the TV supply chain have led to a slowdown in shipments,” said Paul Gagnon, director of North America TV Research for NPD DisplaySearch.
BUSINESS
January 2, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
The user names and phone numbers of more than 4.6 million Snapchat users were posted online this week by an anonymous hacker, just days after the Los Angeles start-up was warned that such a data compromise could happen. On a website called SnapchatDB, which may be run by an individual or a group, files containing Snapchat users' information was posted Wednesday. The website has since been taken down, but while it was live users could download the data in SQL or CSV format. The data contained the user names and associated phone numbers of many users, all located within North America but primarily in the U.S. The final two digits of each phone number were also censored in order to offer the affected users some protection.
BUSINESS
October 25, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
First there was tube-TV. Then came flat-screen, followed by high-def. Now comes the latest - Ultra HD. Will it be a hit, or flop like 3-D? On Thursday, LG will begin selling an 84-inch Ultra HD TV at the Video & Audio Center in Lawndale, the first time that the next-generation TV technology will go on sale in the U.S. Ultra HD is the branding term for TV sets with roughly four times the resolution of 1080p HD TVs. Ultra HD TVs promise to bring the clarity you see on 40-inch HD TVs to sets with screens larger than 60 inches.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2013 | By Los Angeles Times staff
LAS VEGAS -- Walking around the Consumer Electronics Show on Tuesday, nothing stood out quite as much as watching a woman stick her hand behind a TV and then seeing her hand through the set's transparent screen. No, it wasn't a magic trick. The Hisense employee was showing off the company's see-through 3-D concept, which is a very thin TV with a transparent display. Many walking by the unusual TV made double takes as they couldn't quite figure out what they were seeing. The transparent TV sits about a foot away from a wall with a bright light behind it, which is necessary in order to see the images that appear on the set's display.
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