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50 Years

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NEWS
November 21, 2013 | By Patt Morrison
The three gunshots fired in Dallas 50 years ago meant a presidential legacy unfulfilled - and a personal life unresolved. The sorry mess of sexual exploits that President John F. Kennedy left behind took years to emerge. The supporting cast was vast, and I knew one of them, a woman who was, next to Marilyn Monroe, the most famous one, though not by her choice. Judith Campbell Exner was the first of JFK's lovers to be publicly identified, and so she was pilloried by a public furious at learning that at least one wing of Camelot had more in common with the Playboy Club.
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SCIENCE
March 27, 2014 | By Amy Hubbard
Fifty years ago today, at 5:36 p.m., a magnitude 9.2 earthquake grabbed hold of south-central Alaska and started shaking. It didn't cease for more than four minutes and was felt as far away as Texas and Louisiana. Fissures split the ground, land slid above and below water, buildings cracked and folded in on themselves, tsunamis swamped coastal communities.  In all, 143 people were killed -- crushed, drowned, buried.  It was an epic tragedy, as well as a moment of clarity, however painful, for scientists.  Geologists and seismologists gathered an immense amount of information from the 1964 Alaska quake.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz and Robert J. Lopez
On the 50th anniversary of President John F. Kennedy's death, Gov. Jerry Brown on Friday reminisced about his encounter with what he described as a charismatic, confident politician. "I had the opportunity to meet John Kennedy and I've never met a politician since then that had an aura and charisma, a presence, a confidence that unique," Brown said in a statement. "To snuff out such a young, vibrant, unique life like that, it left a mark. " Brown on Friday also ordered that state flags be flown at half-staff.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2014 | By Michael D. Sorkin
Murray Weidenbaum taught students at Washington University in St. Louis and presidents in the White House that government should get out of the way and let people and businesses work as hard as they can to achieve as much as they can. He preached deregulation, and his syndicated newspaper columns caught the eye of Ronald Reagan, who in 1980 was running for president. Reagan took Weidenbaum to the White House as his top economic advisor. At first, the administration used tax cuts to fight high unemployment and inflation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2013 | Steve Lopez
When Mickey Fruchter started teaching at the Neighborhood Music School in Boyle Heights in 1964, they didn't tell him how much he'd get paid. The violinist simply showed up, did his job and went home, figuring he'd get the going rate of between $4 and $6 an hour. "When I got my first paycheck, I freaked out," says Fruchter, who was 25 at the time. He was paid 75 cents for a half-hour lesson, or $1.50 an hour. For someone who played professionally and also taught at Cal State L.A., it didn't seem worth the trouble to work for small change.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2014 | By Adolfo Flores and Steve Marble
A 36-year-old Fullerton man who shot a teenager to death as he was helping change a tire on a friend's car was sentenced Friday to 50 years to life in prison in the 2011 slaying. Charles Ramirez was found guilty in December of fatally shooting Larry Ruiz, a 19-year-old who was changing a car tire while the car was parked in an alley behind his parent's Fullerton home. Ramirez confronted Ruiz and accused him of having been in a fight with his friend earlier that day. When Ruiz denied being in a fight, Ramirez punched him in the face, pulled out a gun and shot him in the head, prosecutors said.
TRAVEL
November 12, 2009 | By Clare Abreu
My trip to Cuba last summer was a lifetime in the making. My father emigrated from Havana to Miami in 1961 at age 6, and the family who came with him filled my childhood in Dallas with food, politics, jokes and, yes, dominoes. I longed to visit the source, to understand what all the fuss was about. When the Obama administration loosened travel restrictions in April, my father, sister and I at last booked our tickets to Havana. "Get ready to go back in time," a friend told me. Her words had seemed exaggerated and dark, but the past was unavoidable.
NEWS
September 3, 2013 | By Jay Jones
Free, old-style variety shows will return to Las Vegas in September as longtime entertainer Tony Sacca celebrates 50 years in show business. Sacca , a singer and TV host who has been on the Las Vegas circuit for three decades, will emcee three free shows on consecutive Fridays starting Sept. 13. The 2 p.m. performances will be in the Railhead at Boulder Station , a hotel-casino five miles east of the Strip. The lineups feature some familiar names. On Sept. 13 Sacca will be joined by comedian Louie Anderson , impressionist Rich Natole , singer Kat Ray and tribute band Yellow Brick Road . On Sept.
SCIENCE
July 22, 2013 | By Julie Cart
The world's most endangered feline species may become extinct in the wild within 50 years, researchers say, a victim of climate change. A new report projects that Iberian lynx could become the first cat species in at least 2,000 years to become extinct, researchers found, largely because of the decline of the European rabbit, which makes up 80% of the cat's diet. The report, published Sunday in the journal Nature Climate Change, warns that current efforts to boost population of the distinctive tufted-eared cat will only “buy a few decades” for the animal that was once abundant in parts of Spain, Portugal and France.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2014 | By Joseph Serna
A Whittier man was sentenced to 50 years to life in prison Friday for shooting his former friend to death after they had a falling out over money and a woman. Jose Antonio Barrios, 22, was convicted in January in the death of 27-year-old Robert Guerrero in 2013 after the two ran into each other at a Stater Bros. supermarket. Barrios got into Guerrero's truck, and they drove to a residential area of Norwalk, where he shot Guerrero three times, pushed him out and then drove off. Guerrero's truck was later found two blocks from Barrios' home.
NEWS
March 24, 2014 | By David A. Keeps
In the old-money-obsessed 1980s, Mario Buatta was one of the go-to designers for the rich and famous. His love of English country decorating and glossy floral fabrics earned him the title “The Prince of Chintz.” Buatta's luxurious interiors, with silver-leafed ceilings, glazed walls, patterned carpets, ornate antiques, elaborate draperies and all that flowery fabric, may read as blue blood indulgences today, but his skill at mixing colors, patterns...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2014 | By Joseph Serna
A Whittier man was sentenced to 50 years to life in prison Friday for shooting his former friend to death after they had a falling out over money and a woman. Jose Antonio Barrios, 22, was convicted in January in the death of 27-year-old Robert Guerrero in 2013 after the two ran into each other at a Stater Bros. supermarket. Barrios got into Guerrero's truck, and they drove to a residential area of Norwalk, where he shot Guerrero three times, pushed him out and then drove off. Guerrero's truck was later found two blocks from Barrios' home.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2014 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
The parrot wasn't talking. "I'm teaching her to say, 'I miss Mace,"' said Mace Neufeld, who at 85 reckons the bird, whose name is Margie, will outlast him. With no words of affection forthcoming, Neufeld, a New Yorker who landed in Beverly Hills back when you could grab a sandwich at the Ontra Cafeteria and rent a house with a pool for $300 a month, headed toward the sitting room. He once wrote music for Dorothy Loudon, managed Dusty Springfield, produced "The Omen. " But Neufeld moves with the fervor of a man less concerned with his legacy than the spread sheet of his latest film.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2014 | By David Colker
Clint Eastwood had a "make my day" attitude about Hollywood agents, including his own representative, Leonard Hirshan. "If he didn't return a call, he would have been history!" the screen tough guy said this week. But then Eastwood laughed and said, sadly, "I'm just joking. Lenny always returned a call. " Hirshan was Eastwood's agent for more than 50 years, perhaps a record in Hollywood for a major star. It started when Hirshan was already an established agent with the all-powerful William Morris Agency, where over the years he represented stars such as Jack Lemmon, Angela Lansbury, Walter Matthau and Sophia Loren, and also negotiated film deals for the likes of Elvis Presley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2014 | By Martha Groves
The Huntington Library has purchased the extensive photographic trove of Ernest Marquez, a descendant of Mexican land grantees who owned what became known as Santa Monica and Rustic canyons and parts of Pacific Palisades and Santa Monica. Amassed over 50 years, the 4,600-image compilation includes rare photos of 1870s Santa Monica and Los Angeles. "The group of photographs is the best and most comprehensive collection of its kind in private hands," said Jennifer A. Watts, curator of photographs at the Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens in San Marino.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2014 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Fifty years ago next Sunday, on Feb. 9, 1964, via "The Ed Sullivan Show," America met the Beatles. It was not the group's first appearance on American television. CBS News had reported, dismissively, on British "Beatlemania," and Jack Paar had aired on his talk show a clip of the band playing in England. Their music was in the charts, finally: After a year of outright refusal, Capitol Records (an American arm of EMI, the Beatles' British label) was finally releasing and promoting their records.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2013 | By Nita Lelyveld
It's not so common these days to work in the same place for 50 years, but Doris Perez recently celebrated her 50th year at the Original Farmers Market. She works five days a week at Magee's House of Nuts - weekend mornings and Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday afternoons. Stop by sometime to say hello. Perez, 78, started out at the Desert Date Shop on Oct. 23, 1963 - a few short years after arriving from Dublin to be a nanny to two small children. She worked pies at Du-par's for 38 years until it changed hands and closed for a long renovation.
NATIONAL
November 22, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
DALLAS - It was, Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings said, as if the sky were weeping too. On a cold and rainy day, thousands gathered in downtown Dallas' Dealey Plaza to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. The weather reminded those who were in Dallas 50 years ago of that day, also a Friday, which had dawned overcast but cleared to gleaming sunshine in time for Kennedy's arrival. On Friday, the skies never cleared. Rawlings unveiled a monument honoring Kennedy, engraved with words taken from the speech he was to have delivered at the Trade Mart.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2014 | By Joe Flint
Want to relive the 1980 Miracle on Ice or see Mark Spitz swim into the record books? Now you can, thanks to an agreement between the U.S. Olympic Committee and the Paley Center for Media that will make more than 1,300 hours of Olympic footage available to the public. "The U.S. Olympic Archive presented by Gordon Crawford" covers the TV history of the games from 1960 through 2012. Crawford, a prominent media investor and Paley Center board member emeritus is also chairman of the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Foundation and played a key role in bringing the exhibit together.
NEWS
January 30, 2014 | By Matt Ballinger
"Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb" was released 50 years ago this week. The film is regarded as a cinematic masterpiece today (AFI ranked it No. 39 in its 10th anniversary Top 100 in 2007), but in February 1964, Times film editor Philip K. Scheuer didn't find much to like. I'm partial to the deadpan of the subheadline: " Kubrick's 'Satire' Tells All About End of World, Ha Ha . " But this is a great line too: "… a publicist at Columbia, which is distributing the picture, assured me it would be my 'cup of tea.' After suffering through two screenings of 'Dr. Strangelove,' I would sooner drink hemlock.
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