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51st State

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2011 | By Phil Willon, Los Angeles Times
Accusing Sacramento of pillaging local governments to feed its runaway spending and left-wing policies, a Riverside County politician is proposing a solution: He wants 13 mostly inland, conservative counties to break away to form a separate state of "South California. " Supervisor Jeff Stone, a Republican pharmacist from Temecula, called California an "ungovernable" financial catastrophe from which businesses are fleeing and where taxpayers are being crushed by the burden of caring for welfare recipients and illegal immigrants.
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OPINION
January 9, 2014 | By Peter Laufer
In case you can't hear the rumblings down there in the metropolis, residents in the far northern part of the state aren't happy. They believe you people in the south are holding them back, and many of them would like to combine with southern Oregonians to form a 51st state, which they would call Jefferson. Over the last year, wandering Jefferson's back roads while researching a book, I listened to its citizens' complaints and ideas. Many of their grievances are understandable. With the logging, fishing and mining industries already devastated by both over-exploitation and regulation, the Great Recession hit the region especially hard.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 2000
If the state of denial was any bigger in American politics, or in our culture, then a 51st star would have to be added to our flag. MARY ALICE ALTORFER Carpinteria
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2011 | By Steve Harvey, Los Angeles Times
If California State Assemblyman Andres Pico had gotten his way more than a century ago, the college football team that plays its home games in downtown Los Angeles would be known as the University of Southern Colorado Trojans. It was Pico who introduced an 1859 bill to create the state of Colorado out of the counties of California south of Big Sur. He complained that Southern Californians — what few of them there were — were overtaxed and underrepresented. The state Legislature actually bade Southern California goodbye but before Congress could give final approval, a bigger secession problem cropped up — the Civil War. Pico's bill was shelved, then forgotten.
TRAVEL
July 2, 1989 | JOY SCHALEBEN LEWIS, Lewis is a free-lance writer living in Milwaukee.
On the Fourth of July in Denmark, drums roll and horns sound to the beat of "Stars and Stripes Forever," the breezes carrying the noise to picnicking families on the hills of Rebild. For 77 years, except during two World Wars, this small Scandinavian country of 5 million people has celebrated the birthday of the United States at Rebild, the country's only national park, and in Alborg, a city 15 miles from the park. At Rebild, flags from the two nations fly everywhere.
OPINION
August 21, 1988 | Patrick Thomas, Patrick Thomas writes about politics from the District of Columbia.
Paying off Jesse Jackson and his constituency might not pose such a great problem after all for Michael S. Dukakis, if elected. Hints of the prize emerged at the Atlanta convention, when delegates from the District of Columbia sought assurance that the Dukakis camp would support statehood for the federal city, which is more than 70% black and one of the homes of Jackson.
OPINION
January 9, 2014 | By Peter Laufer
In case you can't hear the rumblings down there in the metropolis, residents in the far northern part of the state aren't happy. They believe you people in the south are holding them back, and many of them would like to combine with southern Oregonians to form a 51st state, which they would call Jefferson. Over the last year, wandering Jefferson's back roads while researching a book, I listened to its citizens' complaints and ideas. Many of their grievances are understandable. With the logging, fishing and mining industries already devastated by both over-exploitation and regulation, the Great Recession hit the region especially hard.
OPINION
February 16, 1992 | Sherry Bebitch Jeffe, Sherry Bebitch Jeffe, a contributing editor to Opinion, is a senior associate of the Center for Politics and Policy at the Claremont Graduate School.
Frustrated by a system of government that has failed them, Californians have used the initiative process to dismantle it. They don't want powerful legislative leaders. They don't want entrenched, unaccountable incumbents. They don't want policy gridlock, but they don't want government to spend too much, either. But there's no indication Californians know what they do want.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 1991
In response to Pat Buchanan's column on statehood for Puerto Rico (March 17), I think he misses the central issue. That is, there are 3.5 million people in Puerto Rico who are American citizens, not Puerto Rican citizens or commonwealth citizens. As such, they should have the right to request statehood. Not to accept this right denies their status as equals under federal law. If the U.S. government were to accept a policy of status quo and therefore deny Puerto Rico's right to become the 51st state, then it would, in essence, affirm that all Americans are not equal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1987
Conrad's cartoon (March 3) implicating Israeli government leading officials behind Pollard was right on target. It is time for us to closely examine our entire relationship with Israel. This is not the first time Israel has taken hostile action against the U.S. government. It is politically unrealistic to think that the Congress will ever consider eliminating economic and military aid to Israel, but given our current budget restraints, why not cut it back a bit? Also, let's rethink our entire bilateral relationship.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2011 | By Phil Willon, Los Angeles Times
Accusing Sacramento of pillaging local governments to feed its runaway spending and left-wing policies, a Riverside County politician is proposing a solution: He wants 13 mostly inland, conservative counties to break away to form a separate state of "South California. " Supervisor Jeff Stone, a Republican pharmacist from Temecula, called California an "ungovernable" financial catastrophe from which businesses are fleeing and where taxpayers are being crushed by the burden of caring for welfare recipients and illegal immigrants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 2000
If the state of denial was any bigger in American politics, or in our culture, then a 51st star would have to be added to our flag. MARY ALICE ALTORFER Carpinteria
MAGAZINE
October 29, 2000 | JAMES RICCI
A HARDHEADED OBSERVER TAKING A LONG LOOK AT CALIFORNIA, WITH its 35 million people and countless separate high school football championships, might wonder how anyone can call it a "state" anymore. In the traditional American sense, the concept of a state implies a certain compactness, a certain manageability, a certain commonality of interests among its residents. Until about a century ago, state patriotism was an important sentiment on the American emotional landscape.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1997
President Clinton is playing a cruel hoax on Martin Lee, the Hong Kong pro-democracy activist, by meeting him at the White House (April 19) and making empty promises through his spokesman that "there would be consequences for any erosion of the freedom and liberties that are currently enjoyed by the people of Hong Kong." China knows abundantly well by now that Clinton is a paper tiger held hostage by the advocates of "business at any price," and will either dismiss this latest bravado out of hand or, just to tweak Clinton's nose, clamp down some more on Hong Kong.
NEWS
June 6, 1993 | LAURA RANDALL, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
When 22-year-old Alberto Rivera-Fournier walks into a U.S. bar, he is sometimes asked to produce a visa along with his Puerto Rican driver's license. When a woman called the National Press Club in Washington for a copy of a speech that Puerto Rico's governor had recently given there, she was told: "Call the embassy." When a Puerto Rican woman applied for a fast-food job in nearby Alexandria, Va., she was turned away because she didn't have a green card. Visa? Embassy? Green card?
OPINION
February 16, 1992 | Sherry Bebitch Jeffe, Sherry Bebitch Jeffe, a contributing editor to Opinion, is a senior associate of the Center for Politics and Policy at the Claremont Graduate School.
Frustrated by a system of government that has failed them, Californians have used the initiative process to dismantle it. They don't want powerful legislative leaders. They don't want entrenched, unaccountable incumbents. They don't want policy gridlock, but they don't want government to spend too much, either. But there's no indication Californians know what they do want.
NEWS
May 6, 1987 | Associated Press
A House subcommittee Tuesday approved a bill to grant the District of Columbia statehood, the first step in a long legislative process that proponents hope will lead to the creation of a 51st state. The bill, approved 4 to 3 by the House District Committee's subcommittee on fiscal affairs and health, would create the state of New Columbia and grant it full voting representation in the House and Senate, a right the 630,000 residents of the city of Washington do not have now.
NEWS
January 27, 1992 | PAUL FELDMAN
Unemployment stands at 7.7%. The budget deficit is pushing $5.2 billion. And the price of a home, while dropping, remains among the nation's highest. As the Golden State's luster tarnishes, fewer settlers are coming from other states. Yet in raw numbers, the increase in California's population continues to be staggering. In a 15-month period since the 1990 census, California grew by 620,000 residents, primarily through births and foreign immigration, the U.S. Census Bureau estimated.
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