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5th Amendment

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1996 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Al "A.C." Cowlings invoked his 5th Amendment right against self-incrimination for the second consecutive day Wednesday during a deposition in the wrongful death lawsuit that accuses O.J. Simpson of responsibility for the June 12, 1994, murders of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Lyle Goldman.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb
He walked into the courtroom Tuesday, dressed in a dark blue suit, and sat in the front row. Everyone was certain this would be another perfunctory appearance by former Bell Police Chief Randy Adams, who in one brief appearance on the witness stand had invoked the 5th Amendment against self-incrimination 20 times. But when Adams stood up and Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Kathleen Kennedy asked what he planned to do, the former lawman surprised everyone in the courtroom.
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NEWS
May 21, 2013 | By Richard Simon and Joseph Tanfani
WASHINGTON  - A top IRS official in the division that reviews nonprofit groups will invoke the 5th Amendment and refuse to answer questions before a House committee investigating the agency's improper screening of conservative nonprofit groups. Lois Lerner, the head of the exempt organizations division of the IRS, won't answer questions about what she knew about the improper screening  - or why she didn't disclose it to Congress, according to a letter from her defense lawyer, William W. Taylor III. Lerner was scheduled to appear before the House Oversight Committee on Wednesday.
NEWS
June 27, 2013 | By Michael McGough
On Wednesday, the Supreme Court struck down a law that defined marriage for federal purposes as the union of one man and one woman. But what part of the Constitution did Section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act violate? It's surprisingly complicated. Before this week's decision, the conventional wisdom was that if Justice Anthony M. Kennedy wrote a majority opinion striking down Section 3 of DOMA, he would emphasize the states' right to define marriage. This prospect troubled supporters of gay rights because it's a double-edged sword.
NEWS
May 22, 2013 | By Richard Simon and Melanie Mason
WASHINGTON - A top Internal Revenue Service official invoked the 5th Amendment and declined to testify Wednesday before a House committee investigating the agency's mishandling of applications by some conservative groups for tax-exempt status. Lois Lerner, director of the IRS' exempt organizations unit, spoke deliberately and crisply in her opening remarks to the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, the first time she has appeared before Congress since she revealed earlier this month that the division she oversaw inappropriately screened and questioned tea party and other groups seeking nonprofit status.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1991
Edward M. Rissman is correct in his observation (letter, June 6) that some "patriots" (his in-cheek description) become vocal when those with whom they do not agree exercise their rights under the Bill of Rights (presumably referring to the McCarthy anti-communist days), but remain silent when those with whom they agree do so (using the Oliver North case as an example). He is incorrect, however, in his characterization of the Fifth Amendment's freedom from self-incrimination clause ("nor shall (any person)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1997 | PETER M. WARREN
A former top aide to Assemblyman Scott R. Baugh repeatedly took the 5th Amendment on Monday at the legislator's preliminary hearing in Santa Ana, refusing to testify about her part in preparing two allegedly falsified campaign documents. Maureen Werft, who served as Baugh's chief of staff and campaign treasurer, also declined to answer about half a dozen questions relating to a Baugh campaign disclosure form and his economic interest statement, which she completed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1991
A prosecution witness in the Dalton Avenue police vandalism case can refuse to answer further questions posed to him on the stand, a judge ruled Tuesday. The witness, Los Angeles Detective Robert Clark, who obtained the search warrant that led to a drug raid in South-Central Los Angeles on Aug. 1, 1988, has the right to invoke the 5th Amendment so as not to incriminate himself, Municipal Judge Larry Fidler said.
NATIONAL
May 22, 2013 | By Joseph Tanfani, Richard Simon and Melanie Mason, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - In a contentious climax Wednesday to a series of congressional hearings, Lois Lerner, a key IRS manager, invoked her right to not testify about the agency's targeting of conservative groups, igniting howls from Republicans and sparking a threat to bring her back for another round. Deprived of a crucial witness, members of Congress from both parties alternately grilled and scolded former Commissioner Douglas Shulman about the Internal Revenue Service's improper screening of conservative groups applying for tax-exempt status.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1998 | GERALD F. UELMEN, Gerald F. Uelmen is a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law
If one were to ask any criminal defense lawyer in America what advice he now would give Bill Clinton if he were not president of the United States, one would receive a remarkably consistent response: "Take the 5th."
NATIONAL
June 17, 2013 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Crime suspects need to speak up if they want to invoke their legal right to remain silent, the Supreme Court said Monday in a ruling that highlights the limited reach of the famous Miranda decision. The 5-4 ruling upheld the murder conviction of a Texas man who bit his lip and sat silently when a police officer asked him about the shotgun shells that were found at the scene of a double slaying. They had been traced to the suspect's shotgun. At his trial, prosecutors pointed to the defendant's silence as evidence of his guilt.
NATIONAL
May 22, 2013 | By Joseph Tanfani, Richard Simon and Melanie Mason, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - In a contentious climax Wednesday to a series of congressional hearings, Lois Lerner, a key IRS manager, invoked her right to not testify about the agency's targeting of conservative groups, igniting howls from Republicans and sparking a threat to bring her back for another round. Deprived of a crucial witness, members of Congress from both parties alternately grilled and scolded former Commissioner Douglas Shulman about the Internal Revenue Service's improper screening of conservative groups applying for tax-exempt status.
NEWS
May 22, 2013 | By Richard Simon and Melanie Mason
WASHINGTON - A top Internal Revenue Service official invoked the 5th Amendment and declined to testify Wednesday before a House committee investigating the agency's mishandling of applications by some conservative groups for tax-exempt status. Lois Lerner, director of the IRS' exempt organizations unit, spoke deliberately and crisply in her opening remarks to the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, the first time she has appeared before Congress since she revealed earlier this month that the division she oversaw inappropriately screened and questioned tea party and other groups seeking nonprofit status.
NATIONAL
May 21, 2013 | By Joseph Tanfani, Richard Simon and Melanie Mason, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - As the Internal Revenue Service's last two directors struggled to provide answers Tuesday about the agency's improper scrutiny of conservative groups, a lawyer for another key IRS official said she would invoke the 5th Amendment rather than answer questions about the screening and why she didn't tell Congress about it. Lois Lerner, director of exempt organizations for the IRS, will assert her right against self-incrimination during her...
NEWS
May 21, 2013 | By Richard Simon and Joseph Tanfani
WASHINGTON  - A top IRS official in the division that reviews nonprofit groups will invoke the 5th Amendment and refuse to answer questions before a House committee investigating the agency's improper screening of conservative nonprofit groups. Lois Lerner, the head of the exempt organizations division of the IRS, won't answer questions about what she knew about the improper screening  - or why she didn't disclose it to Congress, according to a letter from her defense lawyer, William W. Taylor III. Lerner was scheduled to appear before the House Oversight Committee on Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2012 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
A Los Angeles man who spent 19 years in prison for murders he did not commit will be able to sue the LAPD, a panel of the 9th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals ruled Monday. Harold C. Hall should be permitted to amend his complaint against the city to allege that officers coerced his confession, which the court said was made as a result of "desperation, fear and fatigue," in possible violation of the 5th Amendment. The majority in the 2-1 decision said "the extraordinary circumstances" of Hall's conviction justified the court's unusual action "to prevent a woefully unjust result.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb
He walked into the courtroom Tuesday, dressed in a dark blue suit, and sat in the front row. Everyone was certain this would be another perfunctory appearance by former Bell Police Chief Randy Adams, who in one brief appearance on the witness stand had invoked the 5th Amendment against self-incrimination 20 times. But when Adams stood up and Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Kathleen Kennedy asked what he planned to do, the former lawman surprised everyone in the courtroom.
OPINION
October 26, 2011 | By David B. Rivkin Jr. and Andrew Grossman
On the September night that the state of Georgia put Troy Davis to death, a crowd of several hundred gathered at the Supreme Court in Washington to protest America's continued practice of capital punishment. But they were in the wrong place. The protesters should have assembled 600 miles southeast, in Atlanta. The Constitution does not empower the Supreme Court to proscribe capital punishment or to regulate it out of existence, and those who ignore that point have made it increasingly expensive and less effective.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2012 | By Paul Pringle, Rong-Gong Lin II and Andrew Blankstein, Los Angeles Times
Invoking his right against self-incrimination, the former finance director of the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum declined to testify before a grand jury about alleged corruption at the stadium, then answered questions after a judge granted him limited immunity, transcripts of the proceedings show. Ronald Lederkramer, once the Coliseum's No. 2 executive, left the Coliseum late last year after The Times reported that he used his personal credit card to buy hundreds of thousands of dollars in stadium equipment to pocket valuable reward points.
OPINION
October 26, 2011 | By David B. Rivkin Jr. and Andrew Grossman
On the September night that the state of Georgia put Troy Davis to death, a crowd of several hundred gathered at the Supreme Court in Washington to protest America's continued practice of capital punishment. But they were in the wrong place. The protesters should have assembled 600 miles southeast, in Atlanta. The Constitution does not empower the Supreme Court to proscribe capital punishment or to regulate it out of existence, and those who ignore that point have made it increasingly expensive and less effective.
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