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5th Amendment

BUSINESS
March 23, 2002 | DAVID STREITFELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nancy Temple, a lawyer for accounting firm Andersen being quizzed about her role in the shredding of Enron Corp. documents, cited her 5th Amendment right to keep silent 138 times Friday. Temple was deposed by lawyers who had filed a class-action suit against Andersen, which approved Enron's financial statements. In an unusual move, a federal judge in Houston permitted Temple and eight other Andersen employees to be questioned much earlier than such a case would normally allow.
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BUSINESS
May 15, 1997 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Philip Morris' former research director, Thomas S. Osdene, invoked the 5th Amendment privilege against self-incrimination during a deposition this week in Richmond, Va., and the deposition was halted, sources told The Times on Wednesday. Osdene was scheduled to be deposed during a four-day period by attorneys in the massive civil suit by the state of Texas against the tobacco companies. But the deposition was halted after an hour and the transcript was sealed, the sources said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1991 | CAROL MC GRAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A detective who has been testifying in the Dalton Avenue police vandalism case for three days has refused to answer any more questions because he is now under investigation for possible perjury. By exercising his 5th Amendment right not to incriminate himself, Detective Robert Clark opens himself up to possible discipline and firing by Police Chief Daryl F. Gates, according to the city attorney's office.
NEWS
November 8, 1997 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House committee investigating campaign fund-raising subpoenaed Johnny Chien Chuen Chung on Friday to testify next week, setting up the likelihood that the Torrance businessman will decline to testify before television cameras. Chung, among the Democratic Party's largest campaign donors in recent years, emerged as one of the most colorful figures in the fund-raising furor--an entrepreneur who has brought embarrassment to a president he supported with hundreds of thousands of dollars.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2002 | WARREN VIETH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The brother of former ImClone Systems Inc. Chief Executive Samuel D. Waksal testified Thursday that he phoned Waksal with bad news about the firm's flagship product the day before family members began dumping shares in allegedly illegal insider trading. Harlan W. Waksal, who replaced his older brother as ImClone's CEO last month, told a House subcommittee he informed Samuel Waksal on Dec.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1989 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Lincoln Savings & Loan owner Charles H. Keating Jr., citing the Fifth Amendment, will refuse to testify today when he is called before a House committee to answer allegations that his fraudulent business practices caused the $2.5-billion collapse of the Irvine thrift, according to his lawyer. Attorney John J.
NEWS
September 7, 1995 | STEPHANIE SIMON and HENRY WEINSTEIN and ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A somber, stony-faced Detective Mark Fuhrman asserted his 5th Amendment rights against self-incrimination three times Wednesday, refusing to answer questions posed by defense lawyers who charge that he framed O.J. Simpson. "Was the testimony that you gave at the preliminary hearing in this case completely truthful?" defense attorney Gerald F. Uelmen asked in a quick, pointed confrontation with Fuhrman, who has told jurors he found a bloody glove at Simpson's estate.
NEWS
September 20, 1995 | RONALD J. OSTROW and ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Likening himself to a tuna thrown into the sea to satisfy "hungry sharks," the ranking FBI official at the 1992 Ruby Ridge, Ida., siege said Tuesday that the bureau engaged in "damage control" when questions were raised about the killing of an unarmed woman by an FBI sniper. Testifying publicly for the first time since his May 3 letter to a Justice Department internal watchdog complaining of a cover-up and of being made a scapegoat, Eugene F.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 2005 | Andrew Blankstein, Times Staff Writer
Marlon Brando's son Christian took the 5th Amendment at Robert Blake's civil trial Tuesday, refusing to answer nearly two dozen questions about the murder of the actor's wife, Bonny Lee Bakley. With his lawyer, Bruce M. Margolin, at his side, an uneasy Brando confirmed his voice on a tape of a conversation, in which he could be heard telling Bakley: "You're lucky somebody ain't out there to [put] a bullet in your head."
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