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7 Eleven Convenience Food Stores

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1993 | ANTHONY DUIGNAN-CABRERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the eight 7-Eleven stores destroyed in last year's riots reopened Thursday amid much fanfare, Korean-American grocers charged that they have received unfair treatment by the Los Angeles city government in their efforts to reopen.
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BUSINESS
December 25, 1998 | From Reuters
Along with soft drinks, prepaid phone cards, six packs of beer and gasoline, Southland Corp. has recently started aggressively promoting wine in its 7-Eleven convenience stores. The 3,200 7-Eleven units in the United States allowed to carry wines under local liquor ordinances now stock up to 30 different kinds of varietal and premium brands, at prices ranging from $5.99 to $14.99 a bottle, said Dennis Phelps, the retailer's category manager for beer and wine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 2000 | ANA BEATRIZ CHOLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As children walk to and from Coliseum Elementary School, they must navigate around gangs, drugs and violence on a daily basis. Their neighborhood is well known to every officer in the Los Angeles Police Department's Southwest Division. At least 88 stores in a nine-mile radius already have liquor licenses, police say. The last thing area residents need there, officers said, is a 7-Eleven store selling alcohol across the street from where the children go to class.
BUSINESS
January 22, 1994 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The parent of 7-Eleven Stores said Friday that it is terminating franchise agreements with operators of eight San Fernando Valley stores for overcharging victims of Monday's devastating quake. Dallas-based Southland Corp. said employees, which the chain sent out as undercover shoppers, were charged inflated prices for food, water, batteries and cigarettes at the stores.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1990 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An arbitrator has found Southland Corp., parent of the 7-Eleven retail chain, guilty of intentional racial discrimination against a black couple who owned two of the company's convenience stores in the Los Angeles area. The arbitrator, however, ruled in the Dallas-based company's favor in a separate racial discrimination case. Jack A.
BUSINESS
March 23, 1990 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The financially strapped parent of the 7-Eleven convenience store chain, Southland Corp., announced Thursday that it has agreed to sell 75% of the company to its longtime Japanese partner in a tentative deal roughly valued at more than $750 million. If completed, the acquisition would be the biggest Japanese investment ever in a U.S. retailer.
BUSINESS
April 3, 1990 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Southland Corp., the troubled parent of the 7-Eleven convenience store chain, said Monday that it could be forced to file for bankruptcy this year if it fails to restructure its massive debt. The Dallas-based company also reported a fourth-quarter loss of $1.01 billion after taking a $947-million writeoff that reflected the sale of its 50% interest in Citgo Petroleum Corp. in January.
BUSINESS
May 20, 1990 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ah, the joys of running your own 7-Eleven store. Late-night robberies, even if they strike far less often than years ago, still are a nasty occupational hazard. Finding capable clerks who won't steal merchandise is only a little easier than keeping a Slurpee from dripping on a summer day. As if that isn't worrisome enough, the overall industry is getting pinched by stepped-up competition and hefty debts from corporate buyouts gone awry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1995 | DAVID REYES and THAO HUA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Hundreds of mourners paid last respects on Thursday to Nirmal Singh, a 7-Eleven clerk who was gunned down at a La Habra store by two robbers who got away with $40. In their grief, relatives expressed anger at the Southland Corp., the Dallas-based parent company of 7-Eleven stores, and issued a list of demands for increased security, including guards, bulletproof windows and bulletproof vests for store employees. "We also want 7-Eleven stores to close between the hours of midnight to 6 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1991 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The obviously drunk woman staggered into the 7-Eleven store on Sunburst Street in Lake View Terrace, pulled a $5 bill from her coat and wordlessly placed it on the counter. Recognizing a regular customer, the clerk pulled a pint of liquor from below and handed over her change, even though selling alcohol to an intoxicated person is illegal. The incident, observed by police vice officers, was typical of the store's indifferent sales practices, according to residents and customers.
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